Komorkis

moonrise

 

Komorkis wakes and moves across the land,
ensnaring shadows left in fields and streams.
Another day is running out of sand.

She gathers laggard amethyst light beams
and casts a dark blue tasseled blanket wide,
ensnaring shadows left in fields and streams.

Inside each covert place where one can hide
she takes a peek to see what she can find
and casts a dark blue tasseled blanket wide.

In gardens where red roses are entwined,
where Leprechauns are known to pot their gold,
she takes a peek to see what she can find.

Before too long the stars turn bright and bold,
each nighthawk flies back homeward to its nest
where Leprechauns are known to pot their gold.

On far-off comets, Sandman dons his vest.
Komorkis wakes and moves across the land;
each nighthawk flies back homeward to its nest,
another day is running out of sand.

 

© Eric Linden

*Komorkis* (Native North American) – The Blackfoot tribe celebrated her as the goddess of the moon.

Review

This poem has a presentation of light weaving through dark like a prowling presence that is shape-shifting. The way you use “amethyst”, “dark blue”, “red”, “gold” creates a preeminence of color that is changing hue like a changing state of being. It is eerie, but enticing. This technique helps the poem to flow, and carries the reader, ever so lightly, into the unknown.

I did not have time to research “Komorkis”, but I am so glad that you added a note that she is the Blackfoot goddess of the moon. Now I can really see how your use of darkness, light, and color created her presence — and kept it flowing like the “running sand”.

Katherine Michaels

Black Rock Angel
In a Sooty Boot-Black Ginnel