Trijan Refrain

The Trijan Refrain, created by Jan Turner, consists of three 9-line stanzas, for a total of 27 lines.
Line 1 is the same in all three stanzas,
although a variation of the form is not to repeat the same line
at the beginning of each stanza.
In other words, the beginning line of each stanza can be different.
The first four syllables of line 5 in each stanza are repeated as the
double-refrain for lines 7 and 8. The Trijan Refrain is a rhyming poem
with a set meter and rhyme scheme as follows:
Rhyme scheme: ababccddc
 Meter: 8/6/8/6/8/8/4/4/8
source: shadowpoetry.com
note: on the template below I have colored line 1,
Indicated that in the formal poem it should be first line of each verse.
in the poem below, I followed formal protocol for the first complete Trijan Refrain, then lapsed to the ever more poplular technique of not requiring first line stanza repetion.

Example Poem

(This poem in the strictest sense is NOT a Trijan Refrain, for it violate TWO of the requirements.
It is NOT three stanzas, AND it does not repeat the first line of the first stanza, as the first line
of the other stanza.  It’s failings may make it instructional….)

Crop Circles
Crop Circles are works to amaze.
Sources of awe and hate!
For two score plus, a world-wide craze
to shock and aggravate.
It aggravates the farmers who
lose cash when fields are trampled through.
It aggravates.
It aggravates,
but there’s not much that they can do.
Crop Circles are works to amaze
from ancient times ’til now.
A marvel upon which to gaze,
made in the night somehow.
They were simple in early days.
Mere circles. shown in diff’rent ways.
They were simple,
They were simple.
Complex now, harder to appraise.
Crop Circles are works to amaze
across our planet earth.
Hoaxers we know have made displays
Art forms of splendid girth.
Not all are false; most have proved true.
Could not be made by me or you.
Not all are false,
Not all are false.
Messages require a global view.
Crop formations they are now called.
Using geometry.
Mathematics leave us enthralled
with their complexity,
Math is the same in every land.
Greek, Chinese, Arab understand.
Math is the same.
Math is the same.
So global message must be planned.
Crop formations they are now named,
choose pre-historic sites
like Stonehenge and others so famed
to inscribe their delights.
Unsolved myst’ries believed to be
formed by some intelligentry.
Unsolved myst’ries,
Unsolved myst’ries
clues now distributed widely.
Since I began this poem to write.
This three-D box was made.
Of course it sprang up overnight.
It doesn’t look homemade.
It baffles me what it might mean
laid out so nicely on the green.
It baffles me,
It baffles me.
If it’s a hoax that will be seen.
The Mormons have not staked a claim,
nor have the Jews, I think.
Christians, Buddhists don’t seek acclaim,
some odd cults may, don’t blink.
We don’t know how just over night
Huge shapes appear, proportions right.
We don’t know how,
We don’t know how.
Energy remains at each site.
Mayan themes have been oft addressed.
Celestial cycle lore
hints that earth shall soon be distressed
by changed magnetic core.
We can have help as ancients did,
in building the great pyramid
We can have help,
We can have help.
It could be; that would be splendid.
(c) Lawrencealot – July 6, 2012
Visual Template

Trimeric

Trimeric tri-(meh)-rik n: a four stanza poem in which the first stanza has four lines
and the last three stanzas have three lines each, with the first line of each repeating
the respective line of the first stanza.
The sequence of lines, then, is abcd, b – -, c – -, d – -.
There is no line length, meter, or rhyme requirement or prohibition.
Example Poem

Whisky Works

He zig-zagged up the steep hill
much too drunk to walk a line.
Winter weather laid down a chill
with ice on that steep incline.

Much too drunk to walk a line
he headed home, had time still.
Unless he fell he’d be fine.

Winter weather laid down a chill
as he staggered up the hill.
He’d make it;  he had the will.

With ice on that steep incline
(he had lots of time to kill)
his anti-freeze worked just fine.

© Lawrencealot – April 29, 2012

Trilonnet

Created by Shelley A. Cephas
A 14 line poem made up of four tercets and one rhyming couplet.
Meter: iambic tetrameter or iambic pentameter.
Each 3 line verse is an unrhymed triplet, but there is rhyming between the stanzas..
2 rhyme schemes: abcabcabcabcdd  or abccbaabccbadd

Example Poem

Little Brick Library

When I was young,  and that means wee,
My nearby library did astound.
I started stopping every day.

I’d roam the shelves from about  three
’til five o’clock or ’til I’d found
one book I could not put away.

It was wonderful they were free;
the best resource that I had found
and books had so darn much to say.

This was long ‘fore girls intrigued me.
The building was a good friend found,
where I’d rather hang-out than play.

Those short years opened wide the door.
to much I still plan to explore.

(c) Lawrencealot – May 4, 2012

Visual Template

Triolet

A Triolet is a poetic form consisting of only 8 lines.           
Within a Triolet, the 1st, 4th, and  7th lines          
repeat, and the 2nd and 8th lines do as well.           
The rhyme scheme is simple:  ABaAabAB, capital          
letters representing the repeated lines.    
 
There is no set syllable count, although the preferred one for repeating forms is the standard of eight syllables but there are many good examples around using iambic pentameter and similar meters.
Example Poem:
Pug Peed Too     (Triolet)
Into the copse we walked to take a pee.
I watched for cops, Pug just lifted his leg.
I’m glad Ms. Klag, the nag, saw him not me.
Into the copse we walked to take a pee.
I’ll merely bail him out and set him free.
and remember my next Pug should be Peg.
Into the copse we walked to take a pee.
I watched for cops, Pug just lifted his leg.
 
(c) Lawrencealot –  June, 2012
 
Picture Credit:  www.pinterest.com
 
 
Visual Template
 
 

Triquain

Triquain…created by Shelley Cephas,
A Triquain is a seven line poem with syllables in multiples of 3 as follows:
3, 6, 9, 12, 9, 6, 3 This form is always centered.
syllabic,3/6/9/12/9/6/3,unrhymed,7 lines
ALWAYS Centered
 
 
Example Poem:
 

Interim Heaven  (Triquain chain – Cephas) 

 
The puppy
brought to the hospital
where the boy was dying adopted
him on first sight.  The lad’s pain was subdued by drugs.
Nothing could subdue the instant joy
filling him as he hugged
The puppy.
 
The cancer
would not relent, and yet
the boy’s eyes were brighter than before
and he never cried another day.  The puppy
snuggled when he slept and licked his face;
played gently other times
with the boy.
 
When the boy
passed on while he slept, the
puppy knew and whined, parents wept.  In
tears a younger brother took the pup, who shut up
and licked away that boy’s tears.  Wiping
grief away, replacing
it with love.
 
(c) Lawrencealot – May 7,2012
 
 
Visual Template:

As it happened, the Triquain above was the first one that I encountered.
It was not however, the first form given the name.

• The Triquain, found in Berg’s Pathways for the Poet 1977 appears to be an attempt at combining the haiku and Crapsey cinquain. It was created by L. Stanley Cheney and referred to in both the Caulkins’ Handbook and Pathways. This form comes a little closer to the purpose of haiku than some other haiku wannabees. There is another invented form also called a Triquain that appeared on the internet about 25 years later written in a syllabic heptastich.

The Triquain is:
○ a tristich, a poem in 3 lines. It is composed in 3 units, L1 introduces the subject, L2 expands and leads into action, L3 is the enlightenment or question.
○ syllabic, with 2-7-7 syllable count per line.
○ Titled, unlike the haiku.

stud by Judi Van Gorder

newborn
leggy colt struggles to stand
first of many challenges

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1188#triquain
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Inquiry (Triquan-Cheney)

questions
preceding words, as babble
most unanswered before death

(c) Lawrencealot – October 29, 2014

 

Tritina

The pattern of word-repetition is as follows, where the words that end
the lines of the first tercet are represented by the numbers “1 2 3”:
  1 2 3          – End words of lines in first tercet.
  3 1 2          – End words of lines in second tercet.
  2 3 1          – End words of lines in third tercet.
  (1 2 3)        – Words contained in the final line.
Your Composition.
The repetition of words in a Tritina makes this form a good match for
a story that uses common speech, for in conversation the repetition
of key words is common. The Tritina is a more “natural” form than the
Villanelle (which is comparatively artificial in repeating whole lines)
and the Sestina (which is significantly more challenging because it is
longer (39 lines) and reuses six words
in six six-line stanzas and a closing tercet).
Example Poem
Fido
I have  always liked dogs.
Almost all dogs I like.
And almost all like me.
Their faithfulness moves me.
I prefer smaller dogs
‘Cus big poop, I  don’t like.
Of course I  still do like
gals who are nice to me.
as long as they like dogs.
I like dogs;  dogs like me.
Visual Template

Triquatrain

The form name “Triquatrain” was most likely contrived by Robert L. Huntsman as found listed on shadowpoetry.com. However he most likely stole the credit by giving a name to simple didactic verse. 
This is obvious because “Jack and Jill” was written in the 1760s.
There is also reference to it in William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream at the end of act three: “Jack shall have Jill; Nought shall go ill.”  (Just a little history there) 
It is a quatrain poem in tri-rhyme with a specific rhyming pattern (see below). 
Lines 1 and 3 have internal rhyme whereas lines 2 and 4 do not. 
Rhyme Pattern:
(a,a)
(c,c)
(d,d)
(f,f)
e
(g,g) 
(i,i)
h

Example Poem:
 
Fred Meets Trixie

Now Fred was nice; he worked in vice
and could not be corrupt.
Take the money, have a honey.
He made them all shut-up.

He closed down rooms that reeked of fumes,
that turned out to be meth.
He smashed their tools, then told the fools,
“Wages of sin are death.”

Prostitution?  His solution:
Arrest each whore and John.
So straight he played, that I’m afraid.
Some councilmen are gone.

Some lovely chicks had turned some dicks,
(Detectives),  I should say.
But, no cutie, or real beauty
Could cause our Fred to sway.

Business was down all over town,
confession booths were slow.
The internet was busy yet
it brought no local dough.

Then just by chance one day Fred glanced
across the cafe floor.
As Trixie came (the perfect dame)
right through the joint’s front door.

Passions promised in some fashion
many times thru the years,
It seems  absurd without a word
said,  she had meshed his gears!

After they talked, together walked,
She put him to the test.
“Play on my range,” she said,” for change
is as good as arrest.”

 
 
Visual Template

Trois-par-Huit

The Trois-par-Huit is a short eight line poetic form that is striking and fun to play with.
This form was created by Lorraine M. Kanter
and goes by a few other names as well, the Octa tri and the Three by Eight just to name a couple.

The structure of the Trois-par Huit is easy to compose as it only has three stanzas of 3,3,2 or 3,2,3, lines which can be decided on your own personal taste.

As with many forms the Trois-par-Huit has a syllable count: 3/6/9/12/12/9/6/3.
Rhyme scheme: aabbbccc.

The last line of the poem should be the title of the piece
and should summarize what the poem is about.
Example Poem:
Finish Forms

Quench my thirst.
The unknown  is the curse.
I must scour pages of AP sages

Find their every form though it may take me ages.
Then if they keep inventing… put  them in cages.

In cases where changes come in swarms
document  all the norms.
Finish forms.

© Lawrencealot – April 21, 2012

Tyburn

A six line poem consisting of 2/2/2/2/9/9  syllables.
The first four lines rhyme and are all descriptive words.
The last two lines rhyme and incorporate the first, second, third, and fourth lines as 4 syllables
Rhyme Scheme:  xxxxaa
Example Poem:
Campus Choices
Brashest                                                        
Dullest
Dearest
Cutest
The brashest, dullest jock, slow to start
Found the dearest, cutest, girls too smart.

Vignette

Vignette is a French word meaning “little vine”.
A vignette is a short narrative sketch using evocative figurative language to convey imagery. 
Often considered poetic prose it is formatted in free verse and on vignette can include several short stanzas. 
For multiple vignettes each should be labeled by a number or letter, most commonly roman numerals.

According to Poetry Magnum Opus,
a Vignette, Old French, is a brief descriptive verse. This is a genre of verse that uses clear and detailed images to paint a picture of a moment in time.
A vignette is usually short and focused. The frame of the Vignette is at the discretion of the poet. A syllabic verse form also called a Vignette* is one of the many frames a poet might choose.

My example

Bereft (vignette)

Inellectually I am
aware the meter matters
and would like my poems to sound
as though a poet had dropped by

II

But within my head
I have no metronome
and when the dictionary
gives alternates for stress
or worse, shows none at a
I’m lost

 III

A missing gene perhaps?
It’s sad to encounter
the silence of the iambs

 (c) Lawrencealot – February 16, 2013