Oxylet

Invented by Bhaskar Datta  writing on Allpoetry.com.
Within a Triolet, the 1st, 4th, and  7th lines
repeat, and the 2nd and 8th lines do as well.
The rhyme scheme is simple:  ABaAabAB, capital
letters representing the refrain lines.
Make writing a Triolet more challenging!
Make each line 8 syllables in length (4 metrical feet),
written in iambic tetrameter (the more common way),
or try it in pentameter (English version)
NOW that you have done that, add an oxymoron to each line and you have an OXYLET.

Example Poem

Left Ain’t Right

Now we will try to right a wrong 
for we don’t find the left is right. 
We are aroused, but passive throng. 
Now we will try to right a wrong 
We’ll loudly sing our quiet song 
and wage this year our peaceful fight. 
Now we will try to right a wrong 
for we don’t find the left is right. 
 
 
Visual Template
 
 

Mirror Sestet

The Mirror Sestet, created by Shelley A. Cephas, is a poem that can be
written in one or more stanzas of 6 lines each. The specific guidelines for
this form are as follows:
The first word of line 1 rhymes with the last word of line 1.
The first word of line 2 is the last word of line 1 and the
last word of line 2 is the 1st word of line 1.
The first word of line 3 rhymes with the last word of line 3.
The first word of line 4 is the last word of line 3 and the
last word of line 4 is the 1st word of line 3.
The first word of line 5 rhymes with the last word of line 5.
The first word of line 6 is the last word of line 5 and the
last word of line 6 is the 1st word of line 5.
The Mirror Sestet can also be written in non-rhyme.
All rules must be followed except there is no 1st and last word rhyming.
Example Poem
It Worked
“Turds like him can speak in fancy words.
Words that  promise much. Those phony turds.
Great gods I fell for it.”  Here I wait,
Wait for Merlin to do something great.
“Smile for then he’ll make it worth your while.
While there, he’ll match figure to your smile.”
Visual Template

Mirror Oddquain

Oddquain: Created by Glenda L. Hand.

Usually unrhymed.
17 syllables in five lines. Syllable Count: 1/3/5/7/1

Oddquain sequences:   poems made up of Oddquain stanzas.
Crown Oddquains: a five stanza Oddquain sequence
Reverse Oddquains: Reverse syllable patter 1/7/5/3/1
Mirror Oddquains:two stanzas: 1/3/5/7/1   1/7/5/3/1
Oddquain Butterflies: a merged mirror pattern.
Two Oddquains merge but use only one
of the 1 syllables in the joining.
1/3/5/7/1 /7/5/3/1
Example Poem:
Morning Ritual
I
pour a cup
black steaming coffee
sugar provides food value
Ahhh!
Jam
and butter fill the English
muffin crevices
then my mouth,
yum.
© Lawrencealot – April 9, 2012

Lune

The lune is also known as the American Haiku. It was first created by the poet Robert Kelly (truly a great poet) and was a result of Kelly’s frustration with English haiku. After much experimentation, he settled on a 13-syllable, self-contained poem that has 5 syllables in the first line, 3 syllables in the second line and 5 syllable in the final line. 

There is a variant lune created by poet Jack Collom. His form is also a self-contained tercet, but his poem is word-based (not syllable-based) and has the structure of 3 words in the first line, 5 words in the second line and 3 words in the final line.
As with Kelly’s lune, there are no other rules. 

Thanks to Robert  Lee Brewer
Recap:  Kelly Lune, Syllables: 5/3/5
           Collom Lune,   Words:  3/5/3
          Any topic, meter, rhyme, metaphor allowed.
Whereas Haiku is a Japanese word the the plural is still Haiku,
If you write more than one Lune, they are Lunes.
      
Examples
How to Write a  Collom Lune
Lune authorship permits
words, not syllables be counted
three, five, three.
Rhyming Kelly Lune
Rhyming a a a
all the way
becomes quite okay.
© Lawrencealot