Rhupunt

Rhupunt is one of the 24 traditional Welsh forms and has a scheme of aab ccb ddb etc. or aaab cccb dddb etc., or aaaab ccccb ddddb etc. Alternatively, each stanza can be a single line (but this prayer is so short I chose the former layout). It is described here:http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/celtic2.html#awlrhu

My poem above uses Cynghanedd Sain (sonorous or chiming consonance), that is, treating each stanza as a single line: this involves three elements, the first two rimed (end-words of L1 and L2 in each stanza above), and the 3rd (2nd word of L3 in each stanza above) repeating the consonants of the 2nd. Cynghanedd Sain is described here:

http://allpoetry.com/column/2348659 (scroll 2/3 to ¾ of the way down)
A four syllable line each stanza can be of three, four or five lines a..a..a..B.
The next stanza rhymes the similar c..c..c..B.The rhyme could change for the next
stanzas. We end up with a pattern thus:
x x x a
x x x a
x x x a
x x x B

x x x c
x x x c
x x x c
x x x B
I have used but three lines in the example below.
My poem above uses Cynghanedd Sain (sonorous or chiming consonance),
which links the last syllable of L2 to the 2nd Syllable of L3.
that calls for consonant rhyme, but in the last line I stepped it up to full rhyme,
not knowing if this might be forbidden. (It fit too well to ignore.)

Example Poem

Redemption Now

Put on a smile
act all the while
the whole is swell.

Ignore all guile
and evil while
fears will disspell.

Will is our own.
You have here grown
won’t groan in hell.

 

Related Welsh Form are HERE.

Visual Template

Rhupunt

See Rhupunt Hir for a more complete description and one template.

Rhopalic Verse

A poem wherein the nTH word of every line in each stanza has N-syllables.
word 1 = 1syllable
word 2 = 2 syllables
word 3 = 3 syllables
word 4 = 4 syllables
word 5 = 5 syllables,  etc
(Syllabic, line length optional, rhyme optional, meter optional)

Example Poem

Expecting Her (Rhopalic Verse)

I’m thinking cautiously, realizing
that other’s promises evaporate
with nature’s forcible intervention.
She’ll arrive, defeating complications.

(c) Lawrencealot – April 25, 2013

Visual Template

 
 

Rhaiku

A Poetry form invented on AP by Matt
A poem consisting of One stanza of Rhyme, one stanza of haiku,
 and one stanza of free verse.
The order of the components is up to the poet.
 
Example Poem
 
Without Repentance
semi-clad, somnolent,
climbing over broken logs–
kids explore their camp
There had been no time
in the circadian twilight
to properly define the false
Niagara bubbling, with snatches
of Mozart melodies
into nearby brook.
The first awake, they had to take their tawny dog and find
the wonders here that did appear, as frozen, left behind
for summer time respite.  They’d climb and swim and even shout;
for being loud was here allowed, and home-based rules were out-
maybe fleecing their sister (decreasing her oatmeal share),
Some things do last without contrast and happen anywhere.
(c) Lawrencealot – October 20, 2012
Visual Template
 
 

Reverse Word

This form was invented by  Walter E. Ferguson III aka, Thunder_Speech of Allpoetry.The ONLY requirement of this form, is that you use reverse words where ever you might otherwise choose to use rhyme.  Instead of rhyming, the last words of the lines are spelled backwards (reversed) where rhymes would be.

Example Poem

Non-Olympic swimmer

I thought I’d swim a single loop
before I pulled the plug.
I jumped into our swimming pool
and promptly took a gulp.
I thought to myself “damn and rats”
and jumped out on my tarp.
I’ll never be a swimming star,
while sitting on my prat.

© Lawrencealot – September 26, 2012

Visual Template of this poem

Retourne

Like so many other French forms, the Retourne is all about repetition. It contains four quatrains and each line has eight syllables.
(16 lines, 8/8/8/8)

The trick is that the first stanza’s second line must also be the second stanza’s first line, the first stanza’s third line is the third stanza’s first, and the first stanza’s fourth line is the fourth stanza’s first.

Retournes do not have to rhyme. (rhyme optional)

Example Poem

Abandoned

I’d loved her only all my life.
She found another to her taste.
She left me– I now have no wife.
New city, no friends; joys erased.

She found another to her taste.
I begged, pleaded, asked her to stay
“I miss you, come back! what a waste,
keeping your lover is okay.”

She left me– I now have no wife.
Anquish bestirred me. I tried drink.
But quit to give my boys a life.
Work, feed the boys, cry, try to think.

New city, no friends; joys erased.
It took a long while, ‘ere I tried
to date– I was feeling disgraced
How could I ever lose my bride?

© Lawrencealot – April, 2012

Visual Template

 
 

RenRhyme

Invented by Renee Mathews Jackson aka Poetryality of Allpoetry
A “®RenRhyme”© 2006 rmj (Original Form)
Written in 8 or 10 syllable lines, consistently. Meaning do not mix eight with ten but write with either eight or ten syllable lines.

It consists of three, four-line (Quatrain) stanzas (12 lines)
Lines 1-4 in the opening stanza are the refrain lines

Line 1 is repeated as line 2 in the second stanza
Line 2 is repeated as line 2 in the third stanza
Line 3 is repeated as line 4 in the second stanza
Line 4 is repeated as line 4 in the third stanz

®RenRhyme (Rhyme Scheme):
A-B-a*-b*
c-A-c-*a*
d-B-d-b*
There is no meter requirement.

Example Poem
Write a Ren Rhyme

Poetryality built a new form.
A third of the poem’s in stanza one.
You can use it to please, or to inform.
Just write that third and you’ll be two-thirds done.

That eventuates because of refrain.
Poetryality built a new form.
You see, one stanza is used twice again.
You can use it to please or to inform.

Choose eight or ten syllables for line length.
A third of the poem’s in stanza one.
Required repetition gives the verse strength.
Just write that third and you’ll be two-thirds done.

© Lawrencealot – September 3, 2012

Visual Template
RenRhyme

RemyLa Rhyme

The RemyLa Rhyme Form, a form created by Laura Lamarca, consists of 4 stanzas. 
Each stanza has four lines.
 The syllable count per stanza is 8/10/12/8 and
 the rhyme scheme is abca defd ghig jklj. (abcadefdghigjklj)
The first word of stanza 1 must also be the last word of stanza 4. 
The last word of stanza 1 must also be the first word of stanza 2 and the last word of stanza 2 must be the first word of stanza 3.
Finally, the last word of stanza 3 must also be the first word of stanza 4.
J1, x, x, x, x, x, x, a
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, b
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, c
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, A1 

A1, x, x, x, x, x, x, d
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, e
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, f
x, x, x, x, x, x , x, D1 

D1, x, x, x, x, x, x, g
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, h
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, i
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, G1 

G1, x, x, x, x, x, x, j
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, k
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, l
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, J 

Example Poem 

Cant Kick 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Pants hanging around our butt-crack
We met, said “Howdy”, got a bit rowdy
We’d rather play street ball, bounding and bouncing here
than go to the gym or the track.

Track my progress and you will find
I’m a kicker- and no one is quicker.
I simply own this ball game when played on this block.
I’m double-teamed and I don’t mind.

Mind you that’s in this neighborhood.
Today we we’re aiming at taming foes
that kick a wicked ball in Homer’s home ground.
There’s never been a doubt they’re good.

Good enough to stand a real chance.
With me doubled and tripled we did lose.
A loss costs the losers a high-wire pair of shoes.
Next time it could cost me my pants.

(Lawrencealot – June 22, 2012

Visual Template

Raconteur

This is a new refrain poetry form invented by Elizabeth Reed, aka Silverechoes on Allpoetry.

The form is made up of 13 lines – two six-line stanzas and one final line. The two stanzas tell the majority of the story, and the first line of the second stanza should serve as the inspiration for the title (though not required). The last line will be a restatement or rephrasing of the first line of the second stanza. Rhyme scheme and corresponding syllable counts are as follows:
a (8 syllables)
b (9 syllables)
C (10 syllables)
a (8)
b (9)
C (10) (uses same word as line 3 for end-line rhyme)
D (8)
e (9)
F (10)
d (8)
e (9)
F (10) (same end word as line 9)
D (8 OR 10 syllables) (same end word as line 7)
In the rhyme pattern indicated by abCabCDeFdeFD, the lines indicated with capitals contain word refrains.
Example Poem
 
We Missed the Dance
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“Does my old cowboy hat look fine?”
you asked me just as we were leaving.
I turned and looked, and ran into the door.
“Well dear, I d say you look divine,”
“What hat?”-  My eyes were they deceiving?
There were those pokey things that I adore.
“If we perchance can miss the dance
and settle later just for dining
I think I’d rather stay at home instead
exploring signs of our romance
which we can do while we’re reclining.”
With that she led me to our bed instead..
And so we once again have missed the dance.
© Lawrencealot – September 10, 2013
(Notice: Being rebellious, I chose phonic identity, instead of absolute identity in choosing the “C” refrain.

Ravenfly

This is a form created by Amanda J. Norton, writing on Allpoetry as DarkButterfly.
 
It consists of two quatrains and a couplet
with syllables of 8/7/8/7/10/10
rhyming abab cdcd ee
There are no metric requirements.

Example Poem

May I Sit Here   (Ravenfly)

Penelope prevaricates
She’s done it throughout her life.
The truth she just approximates.
Glad she’s someone else’s wife.

She runs down gals she doesn’t know.
Bill,  when choosing where he sits
avoids her;  I would never though,
I appreciate her tits.

Besides by sitting there when ‘ere I can.
She has to slime and smear some other man.

© Lawrencealot – July 11, 2013
Visual Template

Rannaigheacht mhor

Rannaigheacht mhor (ron-á-yach voor, the ‘great versification’) is an ancient Irish quatrain using 7-syllable lines with 1-syllable end-words rimed ababa-rime can be assonance, but b-rime must be rime, here meaning perfect ‘correspondence’ or Comharda, in which consonants of the same class (p-t-k, m-n-ng etc.) are interchangeable—plus alliteration in every line—preferably between end-word and preceding stressed word (always thus in each quatrain’s closing couplet)—with at least two cross-rimes per couplet (assonance okay in leading couplets), one being L3’s end-word rimed within L4.  Being Irish, it requires the dunedh(first word, phrase, or line repeated in closing).  Each quatrain, as well as each leading couplet, must be able to stand on its own.
Modern specs for this form are given here:
Great Versifiers
Men sometimes are dreamers, lost,
lust-driven schemers who, when
hunting, deceive.  With trust  tossed
at great cost; none believe men.

(c) Lawrencealot – May 16, 2012

No template can be more than a rough guide, but here one is:
Note here, I failed to use proscribed alliteration in the final line! Damn.
And upon sober review I find that this fails also, in that the first
couplet cannot stand alone.  Someone competent, please provide me with a perfect example.  I shall replace this.