Ocarina

Ocarina
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, End Word Requirement, Isosyllabic
Description:
Sestina with eight lines per verse for a total of 68 lines.
Attributed to:
Bob Newman
Origin:
England
Schematic:
12345678
85274163
34567812
27416385
56781234
41638527
78123456
63852741
With the envoy:
12 / 34 / 56 / 78
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
8
Line/Poem Length: 
68

Thanks to Charles L. Weatherford.

Note: on Feb 7, 2015, it was brought to my attention Ocarina existed in 1912 with a rhyming schematic.

I will interpret the schematic and list it separately as  Ocarina – Rhymed.

Example Poem
Our Special Place     (Ocarina)
We both embrace this very special place.
When we feel stressed we come for play and rest
it seems sedate and wills all woes to wait.
Don’t you abhor the daily quest for more,
the circular rat-race, the hectic pace
that takes away the willingness to play?
I feel no need to cuss and join the rush
to join the game without our taking aim.
When first we came seclusion was our aim.
Here is a space with tranquil quiet pace
Who would have guessed that just by seeking rest
we’d find a lust for nature’s thrilling rush.
We set out to explore the place, and more,
each other’s face, less lined when in this place.
Most everyday we find that we must play
and let the freight of daily commerce wait.
Arriving late, I caused for you a wait,
but you weren’t sore at all; there’s so much more
encasing one in splendor that the pace
of life gives way and waiting too,  is play.
Your sudden blush invited me to rush
for thoughts un-tame had warned of my aim.
With no disgrace we sanctified the place
as we progressed from urgency, to rest
Upon your breast I’ll lay my hand and rest
among the brush, no longer in a rush.
We swim, explore, embrace in lust once more-
enjoy the pace afforded by this place,
the air’s sachet, the squirrels near, at play.
When calmed by mate the world can always wait-
no other game shares a more lofty aim
than kissing face and slowing down our pace.
At home a flash of lace turns up the pace
at end of day and says you want to play,
but here no such a proxy starts my rush;
natural nudeness claims our bodies’ aim.
My fingers trace pathways to everyplace
where I have pressed my lips and all the rest
I plan to sate with out delay, but wait
we both adore the wait; we’ll wait some more.
The forest floor, one blanket, nothing more
this is our base that turns this tranquil place
with water’s spray into a place to play
and actuate our fantasies and wait
and frame thoughts seeking any greater aim.
There is no race and we both love this pace,
though I’m molested ’til I need a rest.
I would have to blush were it not a rush.
There’s still the push to weekly join the rush
and play that game which is commerce’s aim.
We chase the credits in the market place
Though not obsessed we act just like the rest
and that equates to working while we wait
the week-end to restore ourselves once more.
It’s not the case that we can’t stand the pace
of life’s buffet- we just take time to play.
It’s quite cliché you must mix work and play-
accommodate the mundane while you wait
for fame and wealth if that ‘s part of your aim.
Yet you can brace your soul at any pace
and live with zest if you take time to rest.
Avoid the crush resulting from the rush
and go explore a place where less is more
and in our case that means our special place.
This is a place where both of us may rest,
where waters wait and pause before their more
determined pace resumes, and we can play
without the rush that sometimes seems our aim.
© Lawrencealot – January 10, 2014
Visual Template

Sidney’s Double Sestina

This is posted only for the specifications.  This poet having recently penned a Quartina, an Ocrina,  a Decrina and a Canzone has come up dry at the moment for inspiration for this 75 line poem.
 
Sidney’s Double Sestina
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, End Word Requirement, Isosyllabic
Description:
Sir Phillip Sidney wrote a double sestina where the pattern was just duplicated in verses 7-12, while his envoy had the scheme: 5/2 3/4 1/6. At least he wasn’t as dotty as Swinburne.
Attributed to:
Sir Phillip Sidney
Origin:
English
Schematic:
123456
615243
364125
532614
451362
246531
123456
615243
364125
532614
451362
246531
Envoy: 5/2 3/4 1/6.
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
6
Line/Poem Length:
75

Canzone

I am simply including the inventor’s description here, but note, in my template, I have replaced the capital letters with numbers to indicate the chosen words.
I feel this is more conventional or soon should be.
Canzone
The canzone is an Italian form with strong similarities to the sestina. There are no rhymes; instead there are five keywords that determine the structure of the poem. Every line of the poem – and there are 65 lines altogether – ends with one of the keywords, which must appear in a prescribed order.
Here’s one I made earlier:
Bananas
As will be plain to people of good taste,
The least sense of the five is that of smell,
An adjunct merely to ones sense of taste.
Bananas, say, you know best by their taste.
The skin’s not that distinctive to the touch,
But no-one ever could mistake the taste!
That subtly tangy creamy fruity taste!
Now stick one in your ear. What do you hear?
Be honest – there is nothing there to hear.
The whole point of bananas is their taste.
And look at them – there’s not a lot to see.
A yellow boomerang – that’s all you see.
Although perhaps there is more you can see.
On second thoughts, perhaps sight rivals taste.
From looking at its colour, you can see
Whether it’s ripe enough to eat, and see
If it is over-ripe and rank. Though smell
Can tell you that as well, that I can see.
The shape is something else that you can see.
You could of course detect the shape by touch,
But that’s an overrated sense, is touch.
My policy’s believing what I see –
A pretty common one, from what I hear.
Though I don’t credit everything I hear.
You’re bats if you choose fruit by what you hear.
There’s no excuse for that that I can see.
But with a radio you need to hear.
That is the whole point after all, to hear.
With radios there is no role for taste;
It’s all about the programmes you can hear.
It’s true that maybe now and then you’ll hear
A programme on bananas and their smell;
Technology can’t help you smell the smell;
The smell must be evoked by what you hear.
There’s one potentially confusing touch
Called scratch-’n’-sniff – smell comes from what you touch!
Which proves, perhaps, the primacy of touch,
Though here it’s just augmenting what you hear.
In silent moments you can still use touch.
Bananas have some lovely bits to touch –
There’s more that you can feel than you can see.
The curve; which end is which; all told by touch.
To peel one you must use your sense of touch.
You have to peel the thing before you taste…
But there’s more to it than what you can taste.
If wiggled slightly, with a gentle touch,
It will trisect – releasing waves of smell.
The fifth sense, and the least, the sense of smell.
Still, few things are evocative as smell.
Though mankiness you can detect by touch,
It’s better for that to rely on smell.
You needn’t wash your hands if you just smell.
You ought to smell bananas first, d’you hear?
If they are good it’s quite a different smell,
A really very pleasant sort of smell,
And that’s why you should smell your fruit, you see.
It sometimes tells you things that you can’t see.
Bananas with the true banana smell
Are fruit that it is safe for you to taste.
That’s what it’s all about, of course – the taste.
Sometimes a poem leaves an aftertaste,
Some slight suspicion of a musty smell,
The nagging fear the poet’s lost his touch,
Acquired a wooden ear with with which to hear…
Such faults the bard himself can never see.
“Mankiness” may be a Britishism. “Manky” means “rotten, bad, nasty”. It comes from either Scots, or English dialect, or Polari (homosexual slang), depending on which dictionary you believe.
Anyway, as you see, there are five stanzas of twelve lines each, followed by a five-line envoi (which I am tempted to call a tornada, as for the sestina). The pattern of the keywords goes like this:
    stanza 1: ABAACAADDAEE
    stanza 2: EAEEBEECCEDD
    stanza 3: DEDDADDBBDCC
    stanza 4: CDCCECCAACBB
    stanza 5: BCBBDBBEEBAA
    envoi:      ABCDE
No particular line length or metre is prescribed.
Variations
Other structures are possible, apparently, but I have never seen any of them. The one used here is supposed to be the most common (in so far as any kind of canzone could be described as common).
Prescription
Anyone addicted to writing sestinas should be encouraged to write canzones instead, as a kind of aversion therapy. The canzone goes on too long to be enjoyable for either writer or reader, in my opinion.
A big thanks to Bob Newman for the fine Volecentral resource.
 
My example
 
Impatient Pleas     (Cazone)
 
Come lie with me you pretty, pretty thing,
and let us stop our toying with our words. 
Your flirting with me started off this thing 
and now my mind’s rejecting any thing 
but ideas of you- no other thoughts 
seem even to amount to anything 
because to lie with you’s the only thing 
that promises to make my soul my own. 
My mind minds not directions of my own 
for I most work and tell it that the thing 
I want with you can’t be the first and last 
thoughts each hour should I want my job to last. 
 
You’re such a curvy and becoming thing; 
you beauty leaves me lacking proper words. 
You are a woman for man’s betrothing 
for character shines through without sleuthing. 
although a lesser man may hold out thoughts 
that you would be the optimum plaything, 
once stripped of outer and underclothing. 
It is my plan to take you as my own 
while cognizant you’re not a thing to own. 
Instruct what I must do- I’ll do that thing. 
You’re smitten now, and I want that to last 
I’m not your first but wish to be your last. 
 
How can such ardor ever hope to last- 
It seems almost a supernatural thing? 
When we first kissed I thought “Oh,God! at last” 
I’ve lived, so now fulfilled, can breathe my last. 
Let Lethe leave behind those unsaid words 
for now I wish this mortal life to last 
for even should I find my soul will last 
I want to cherish you in more than thoughts. 
You must be bundled up with loving thoughts 
accumulated and well built to last 
so when the physical’s not ours to own 
your memories will conjoin with my own. 
 
This is the year that we should make our own 
I’ll build a future we’re assured will last. 
I’ll give you confidence that you will own 
all pieces of that heart I called my own. 
And parsing out my heart’s no little thing 
because it’s always only been my own 
and you may have it- while it’s still my own. 
You’ll not have to rely upon my words 
for acttions will be louder than mere words 
and bringing joy to you provides my own. 
So frequently I find you in my thoughts 
and frequently they’re very sexy thoughts. 
 
When we’re apart you’re with me in my thoughts 
and nature makes all scenery my own. 
The whispers leaves exchange are surely thoughts 
about your luscious form and babbling thoughts 
voiced by the chuckling stream recalls the last 
time it lapped where my illicit thoughts 
will wander although more productive thoughts 
would fit the scheme.  There’s no more sensual thing 
than promised passion- not a single thing 
comes close.  the anticipatory thoughts 
may eclipse the act and mock any words 
which may be writ, for they are only words. 
 
Just know that when you penned the pretty words 
of a sweet kingdom stirred, that my own thoughts 
already were in tune with just those words; 
there’ll be no pining there in other words 
for my impatience equal to your own 
confronts and overcomes delays, and words 
are not required to hasten me, though words 
from you are like a siren first and last 
that cannot be ignored.  I know you’ll last 
as long as I; I’m burning beyond words 
so hesitation will not be a thing 
permitted as you are my everything. 
 
Be anxious for that “touch of soft skin” thing. 
Do not expect a waste of time with words. 
A sensual script will emanate from thoughts 
when my urgency meets your very own 
Each time, I’ll feel like saying, “here at last”.
  

 

Visual Template
 
 

Quartina

Quartina
Type:
Structure, End Word Requirement
Description:
The four-line stanza version of the sestina with the typical end-word enfolding.
Attributed to:
Bob Newman
Origin:
England
Schematic:
1234
4123
3412
2341
Envoy:
12 / 34
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
4
Line/Poem Length:
18
   
 
_____________________
 
Quartina
Another variation for which I accept full responsibility is the quartina.  This uses the same idea as the sestina but only has 4 keywords, hence is only 18 lines long. Here’s one:
Eclipse
 
This is the day when we shall see the moon
Dispute the morning sky; usurp the sun;
Beshroud the world in unaccustomed dark.
We know this – and we know it won’t last long.
This is the day; the wait will not be long
Until we’re on the dark side of the moon.
Unseen by us, our life-giver, the sun,
Will impotently rage against the dark.
The birds, lulled into silence by the dark,
Will tuck heads under wings – but not for long.
Two minutes only, this night of the moon,
Before the sky is reclaimed by the sun.
Though there is nothing new under the sun,
All seems new at the dying of the dark.
A second full dawn chorus, loud and long
Will celebrate the passing of the moon.
Don’t worry when the moon obscures the sun.
Although the day be dark, it won’t be long.
 
I chose the name “quartina” so that I could write flawed ones.
© Bob Newman 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. All rights reserved
 
 
 
My thanks to Bob Newman for his wonderful resource site.
 

My Example Poem

Do You Suppose?     (Quartina)

 
A girl well knows what means a rose
when she can get one from a man.
Of course she might prefer a Porsche;
the goal then might be mistress role.
 
If rolling in the hay’s your role
I don’t suppose you need a rose.
If much elan defines your man
Of course one might expect a Porsche
 
It’s never coarse to own a Porsche
or take control of your own role,
but heaven knows a red, red rose
might show the game-plan of a man.
 
I really can picture a man
who owns a horse, but not a Porsche
with plenty soul for either role
who might propose with just one rose.
 
So take the rose and love the man
forget the Porsche and part-time role.
 
© Lawrencealot – January 8, 2013
 
 

 

Visual Template
This is a Quartina ( in iambic tetrameter with added internal rhyme)

 

 

Newman Sestina

The Newman sestina is a standard Sestina (See Here) with only the following added requirement:  Each of the six keywords Must Be an anagram of one another.
Newman sestina
This is a standard (unrhymed) sestina in which all the keywords are anagrams of one another. I was challenged to write such a thing by one of my son’s school friends. Just to prove it can be done: 
Rambling in Tresco
A Scilly sestina
Last Wednesday there were questions in the Cortes
From Miguel Martinez, MP and coster,
Concerning an endangered fowl, the scoter,
Much traded in the thriving private sector,
Delicious roasted in a bacon corset,
A dish so prized it merits an armed escort.
 

Martinez left for home in his Ford Escort.
Alas, he’ll speak no more before the Cortes,
For Semtex slyly planted in his corset
Was detonated by another coster
With interests in the wildfowl trading sector,
A specialist in ptarmigan and scoter.
 

What virtue, to lay down one’s life for scoter!
May choirs of angels strum their harps and escort
This hero straight to heaven’s swishest sector!
Meanwhile, his bill’s in trouble in the Cortes –
No sponsor since we lost our gallant coster;
Debating time’s as tight as any corset.
 

“The currency regime we call the corset
Is more important far than any scoter.”
So says the Chancellor. But wait! Our coster
Has friends who know some girls who sometimes escort
The Chancellor when he’s not in the Cortes,
Who work in, shall we say, the private sector
 

And also in the Chancellor’s privates sector,
And wear the most suggestive style of corset.
A scandal! And the Chancellor quits the Cortes
Thus leaving ample time to save the scoter.
Relief, my ducks, as into law they escort
The bill so ably drafted by the coster.
 

So honour be to Martinez the coster
Great benefactor of the wildfowl sector!
For thanks to him birds get an Air Force escort.
(It’s cheaper than the monetary corset).
His name shall be the toast of every scoter.
Right wondrous are the doings of the Cortes!

Now like stout Cortes in the Darien sector,
I marvel at the coster and the corset,
And at the scoter flying with their escort.
Manifold magazine held a competition for poems in this ridiculous form, which the editor named the Newman sestina in my honour.
 
© Bob Newman 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007. All rights reserved
My thanks always to Bob Newman for his wonderful resource.

 
Visual Template
 
 
 

Duo-rhyme

The Duo-rhyme, a poetic form created by Mary L. Ports, is a 10 or 12-line poem, with the first two and last two lines having the same rhyme scheme, and the center of the poem (lines #3 through #8 or #10) having their own separate monorhyme scheme.
Meter: 8 beats per line, written in iambic tetrameter (4 linear feet of iambic)
Rhyme Scheme: 10-line:aabbbbbbaa and 12-lineaabbbbbbbbaa

Example #1:
Paper Moon
A yellow, paper midnight moon,
the kind that makes young lovers swoon,
casts moonbeams on her golden hair.
Soft wind caresses, not to scare
red, blushing cheeks of maiden, fair.
A scent of lilacs fills the air.
In magic garden – would she dare
unleash her passions without care?
Unusual, the moan and croon
of wind and August, paper moon.
Copyright © 2007 Mary L. Ports
Example #2:
Visitation
Oh, midnight wind with whisperings,
come tease sweet fairy’s crystal wings.
How gracefully she floats tonight
with purple billows flowing bright.
Dear, wistful spirit in the night,
through starlit mist she casts her light.
For welcomed cheek, a kiss just right
is softly placed so that one might
receive her blessings without fright;
love’s beauty sought, a soul’s delight.
To realms of wonder in my dreams
I’ll float upon the songs she sings.
Copyright © 2007 Mary L. Ports
Thanks to Shadow Poetry!

Example Poem

Come On or Come-on (Duo-rhyme)
Come on or Come-on
Oh, please tell me my pretty lass
who flirted on our way to class,
would such intentions in my head
that point directly to your bed
correctly read what was unsaid,
or was I purposely misled?
I want not to appear as crass
but do react to tits and ass.

© Lawrencealot – January 6, 2014

Visual Template

 

Zip

Another English language Haiku analog, for which, excepting the Wikipedia entry below, after seeing this form mentioned on IPF, I found zip.
In the “zip” form developed by John Carley, a haiku of 15 syllables is presented over two lines, each of which contains one internal caesura represented by a double space.[19][2
buoyed up   on the rising tide
a fleet of head boards   bang the wall
John Carley (Magma No 19, 2001)
My Example:

a mob assembled  it was great
flash-mobs  I appreciate

Pendrangle

Pendrangle  is a form created by Penelope Allen aka  PenAllen on Allpoetry.
Stanzaic: Two or more of quatrain couplet pairs
Refrain:  The couplet is a refrain repeated throughout
Isosyllabic:  Hexameter (12 syllable lines)
Rhymed-   mono-rhyme throughout: aaaa BB cccc BB…
Example Poem
Objects of Art     (Pendrangle)
I’m fortunate residing in this time and place
for daily, if I wish I can watch horses race
across the plain or stand and graze with calming grace.
They’ve never pulled a load nor had to wear a trace.
Ascendancy of man, remarkable of course
was aided by domestication of the horse.
The spirit of the horse is recognized in art
in each and every age in which he’s played apart.
They’ve pulled our carriage our cannon and our cart.
They’ve captured man’s respect, and many young boy’s heart.
Ascendancy of man remarkable, of course
was aided by domestication of the horse.
In Nevada, they are allowed now to roam
protected in some areas once their natural home
where grasses, junipers, and sage have always grown.
And though they’re dancing free we feel that they’re our own.
Ascendancy of man remarkable, of course
was aided by domestication of the horse.
The V&T railroad now crosses their terrain
with stops to watch their beauty up above the plain.
They’re one delight of many, one sees from the train.
The horses drew me there, and I’  go back again.
Ascendancy of man remarkable, of course
was aided by domestication of the horse.
© Lawrencealot – January 1, 2014
 Visual Template

Crystalline

Crystalline Verse is a small poem, limited to 17 syllables, whose primary focus appears to be to match the Japanese clarity of image with the English harmony of sound. It was inspired by the Haiku and like the haiku it may be at its best when written in present tense. Any reference that can place the verse in context much like the Japanese kigo (season) or kidai (symbolic seasonal reference) is recommended. 
The Crystalline employs the kireji (cutting word) of the haiku. The kireji in haiku is a word that “cuts off” one view and turns the reader to a different view. In a longer Japanese poem the kireji is 2 long lines inserted midway in the poem that change the direction of the poem not only in structure but in thought. A stand alone small poem such as the Crystalline emulates the long poem’s kireji couplet long line frame and it should “cut” or turn the view from one line to the next.
Unlike haiku which observes the image with objectivity and attempts to keep the ego out of the verse, the Crystalline invites the poet’s subjectivity and permits the poet’s thought and feelings to be communicated through the verse.
The verse form was created by American poet Denis Garrison and more information can be found at his site, Short Verse
The Crystalline is:
  • a complete couplet. It can be a stand alone poem or written in any number of couplets as a longer poem. Like the Renga, a longer poem of Crystalline stanzas can be written by alternating more than one poet.
  • syllabic, 17 syllables. A regular Crystalline is 8/9 or 9/8 syllables per line. An irregular Crystalline is 2 lines totaling 17 syllables and broken where appropriate other than the 8-9/9-8 regular form.
  • written with the English grammatical rules of syntax, caps and punctuation. In other words no all lower case, omitted punctuation, nor incomplete sentences commonly seen in English haiku. Good grammatical English applies.
  • at the poet’s discretion, written with poetic devices such as rhyme, onomatopoeia, metaphor, allusion etc.
  • composed with a “cut” or pivot most often between L1 and L2.
  • untitled.
    The dust of summer covers the shelf
    where in spring you last left your ring.
    Judi Van Gorder
A big thanks to Judi Van Gorder, other than the inventor, I found nothing else of much help.
The Crystalline: A Haiku Couplet
Denis M. Garrison
Four crystallines by Denis M. Garrison:
# 16
Rain-soaked barnyard’s a muddy bog,
but amidst the muck, blooms marigold.
#17
This primeval sea of prairie grass
is grackle-peppered … bison-strewn!
#18
In banyan roots enwrapped,
the granite Cross glows in the midst of lilies.
#19
Turtle shell found on grandma’s grave:
vacant, yet it bursts with violets.
DEFINITION: The “crystalline” is a new haiku analogue; a seventeen syllable couplet that assimilates as much as possible from the Japanese haiku tradition into the English poetic tradition. A primary concern for the crystalline is the euphony of the verse. See examples above
A Big thanks to Dennis M. Garrison
My own example:
In  the backyard grass my dogs all go-
The sidewalk’s game if there is snow.
(c) Lawrencealot – December 4, 2014

 

 

Domino Ryme

  • Domino Rhyme  is a very clever innovation of Bob Newman which can be found at his site as well as many others on the internet. Much like a slinky, rhymes tumble from stanza to stanza, it is something he calls “remote rhyming”.The Domino Rhyme is:
    • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
    • metered, written in a loose tetrameter. Lines should be same length.
    • rhymed. L2 and L3 of the first stanza rhyme with L1 and L4 of the next stanza and so on down until the last stanza when L2 and L3 rhyme with L1 and L4 of the first stanza. abcd befc eghf gijh … iadj.
 Thanks to Judi Van Gorder of PMO.
Domino rhyme

A poem in domino rhyme is written in four-line stanzas, within which there are no rhymes at all. However, every line rhymes with a line in another stanza. Specifically, lines 2 and 3 of each stanza rhyme with lines 1 and 4 respectively of the next stanza. The final stanza completes the loop, its lines 2 and 3 rhyming with lines 1 and 4 of the first stanza.
Here are the opening few stanzas of a poem written in this form:

from Inspiration Fails
They don’t come to me here, the girls
My self-restraint should draw. Who knows
What force might motivate them; why
Most other hermits pack them in.

My fount of inspiration flows
Most fecund when the buckie ears
Of buxom women spur it onward.
One tender bite: I versify

In buckets. But it’s many years
Since last I penned a plangent ode.
My old kerchief still bears the knot
I tied then. Why? Remembering’s hard,

For Lethe’s bitter wind has blowed,
Or current swept my thoughts away.
Some lesser poet conjured it –
He’ll be remembered; I, forgot.

This is the sequel to a poem called Inspiration Falls, and it carries on for quite a lot longer.
Why Domino rhyme?
The idea is to rhyme without the reader consciously noticing, because the rhymes are unusually far apart – what I call “remote rhyming”. With the poem laid out as above, the pattern is relatively easy to spot – but remove the gaps between the stanzas, and the reader is likely to be satisfyingly baffled.
I call this particular rhyming scheme “domino rhyme” for two reasons. First, because the rhymes ripple through the poem like toppling dominoes. Second, because one of the most popular domino games is called Fives and Threes (or Threes and Fives!) and here pairs of rhyming lines are always either five or three lines apart.
Note for Logophiles
In the example above, each stanza is built around an obscure word which does not actually appear in the poem. (This is not an essential part of the verse form!) The words are: agapetae early churchwomen who lived with celibate men; gynotikolobomassophile one who likes to nibble women’s earlobes; quipu mnemonic knots in ancient Peru; castrophrenia: the belief that enemies are stealing ones thoughts.
Similar forms
I only know of one other verse form in which every line rhymes, but all the rhymes are external. This is rimas dissolutas
 Thanks to Bob Newman.
 
My Example Poem
Humility Earned     (Domino Rhyme)

She does not think less of herself
for acts she did when she was young
The scars she has are not displayed
invoked, or played upon at all.

New melodies are being sung
by youngsters facing tempting threats.
She works with them in song and verse
her voice each morning an aubade.

She’s risen above her regrets,
and frets not at all ’bout her past
She harvests beauty floating by,
considers grumpiness a curse.

No opportunity’s your last
mistakes like read books on a shelf
are simply signposts for us all
take note, move on, spread wings, and fly.

© Lawrencealot – December 31, 2013

Visual Template