Decrina

Decrina
Type:
Structure, End Word Requirement, Isosyllabic
Description:
10-keyword version of a sestina for 105 lines.
Attributed to:
Bob Newman
Origin:
England
Schematic:
End-word enfolding pattern:
0123456789
1357902468
3704815926
7419630852
4938271605
9876543210
8642097531
6295184073
2580369147
5061728394
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
10
Line/Poem Length:
105
A big thanks to Bob Newman.
  • Decrina is a longer version of the Sestina attributed to Bob Neuman but I couldn’t find it at his website Poetry By Way. I did find it at Poetry Basehowever. Having written a Sestina, I can’t imagine why anyone would even consider attempting a longer version of the form.The Decrina is:
    • stanzaic, ten 10 line stanzas with a 5 line envoy, a total of 105 lines.
    • metered, lines of equal length, like the Sestina, iambic pentameter or iambic tetrameter.
    • repeated end words in a specific pattern. (Numbers represent words)
      0123456789
      1357902468
      3704815926
      7419630852
      4938271605
      9876543210
      8642097531
      6295184073
      2580369147
      5061728394
      I can only assume the envoy is like the Sestina with even #ed words midline and odd #ed words as end words. 0-9,8-7,6-5,4-3,2-1
A big thanks to Judi Van Gorder
 
My Example Poem
Non-Compliant (Decrina)
Catherine born of Spanish royalty
was destined from her crib to be a queen.
Fredinand and Isabel ruled people
of Aragon, Leon and Castile, all
with an unquestioned linage their daughter
would inherit with devotion to God
through Catholicism that never wavered.
At age of three a treaty pledged the crown
of English queen would be reserved forher,
she spent her youth preparing for that time.

She was to wed Arthur and become queen
when he ascended the throne but all
was modified, first by the acts of God
Then by the machinations of the crown.
Henry the seventh wanted at one time
to wed her to enhance his royalty
That would never help the Spanish people
or King; there’d be no role for his daughter,
in kingdom’s design; he never wavered
for Ferdinand expected much from her.

She was Princess of  Wales and loved by all
before young Arthur died.  She had no crown
and now was no part of the royalty.
A treaty next pledged Ferdinand’s daughter,
to Arthur’s brother, Henry who liked her
and who when his father died made her queen
immediately, now assured by God
and Pope, that Catherine was at that time
still virgin. Still embraced by the people
who in their respect had never wavered.

When Henry the eighth put upon the crown
he relished the insights of the daughter,
of the King of Spain, her input as queen
conjoined the countries int’rests for a time
but the queens love for Henry n’er wavered.
Their first years, a romantic time for all,
and they elevated the royalty
to a source of pride.  Henry trusted her
advice counsel and shared her love of God.
The kings court improved things for the people.

The queens first child was a still-born daughter,
a year later she birthed a son, this time
alive but he died soon after.  In all,
she bore six children- all of them but her
fifth, Mary, died to the grief of people
now hoping for an heir.  To keep the crown
safe was deemed the prime duty of the queen.
The king’s interest in his wife wavered,
and in search of continued royalty
he bedded many not consulting God.

Despite that, he shared power for a time
and while Henry fought in France it was her
direct leadership that won for the crown
more important campaigns; the troops wavered
not one bit with her and her faith in God.
It was three years later that her daughter,
Mary was born and lived; she focused all
That she did thereafter to give people
That her daughter might someday be queen.
She fought to preserve Mary’s royalty

When Henry’s mistress, Bessie Blont had her
son, he was deemed a prince. he King wavered
then in his devotion to his daughter.
The queen had always wanted the people
to have the schooling there for royalty
and strengthened women’s options over time
and educated Mary for the crown.
She always placed her faith in her one God.
So while she lived she worked and gave her all
that her own daughter, Mary might be queen.

Wanting Anne Boleyn, he never wavered
after demanding a divorce. People
hated, and taunted Anne at any time
she would appear in public so  both God
and man seemed to be aligned with the queen.
Thus the King denounced his faith to wed her
and changed the religious world his daughter,
would face with rage in her own royalty.
Now God, and man must answer to the crown.
Catherine loved King Henry through it all.

With royal supremacy the law, people
had to abandon now their Catholic God
and accept the Church of England but her
majesty refused. Stripped of royalty
And power by the announced divorce, all
hope seemed gone, yet she sill never wavered.
She refused inciting war at that time
though there was talk of war to save the queen.
She was not allowed to see her daughter.
Visitors required assent by the crown.

In lesser castles she still beseeched God
and behaved with apparent royalty.
Her support of Mary never wavered
though some were killed for thinking as the queen,
that Mary ought to someday wear the crown.
The winds of change ignore simple people
but history’s cyclone paid heed to her.
I’m not a fan of religion at all;
in tolerance the harvest all the time,
to wit: Bloody Mary, the queen, her daughter.

Despite the royalty of Henry’s time
revoking her claim to possess the crown
she never wavered for that sake of God
and for her daughter, Mary, through it all
the English people always deemed her queen.

© Lawrencealot – December 30, 2013

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Bina

Bina
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, End Word Requirement, Isosyllabic
Description:
Bob Newman has taken the general idea of the sestina and extended it both upwards and downwards from the six-line stanza it normally uses. The Bina is the two-line stanza version. Like the sestina, it is preferable to use isosyllabic lines.
Attributed to:
Bob Newman
Origin:
England
Schematic:
End word repetition pattern:
12
21
Envoy: (12)
Strengths:
It is much shorter and more practical that the sestina.
Weaknesses:
Having shorter stanzas, the end words come back very quickly, so while it isn’t as repetitive and possibly monotonous as the sestina, they will be a very strong presence in the poem. This could make the poem somewhat comic, intentionally or not.
Starting Point:
Because it is only five lines, the flexibility of the end words is not nearly as important as in the sestina; however, they should be chosen well enough that they can be used three times each in five lines and not grate on the nerves.
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
2
Line/Poem Length:
5
Status:
Complete
Bina
An even smaller variation with just 2 keywords and 5 lines is possible; we may as well call this the bina, then we can have:
Wry Bina
When young Michelle was thirsty, she would long
For “that blackcurrant drink – is any left?”
I wonder, now that she’s grown up and left,
If maybe I indulged her for too long.
When in the tooth she’s long, she’ll have none left.
A big thank you to Bob Newman

My Example

Trained Wives     (Bina)

The earning of money has been up to me,

the spending of it’s been up to my wives.

I’ve tried adjusting by taking new wives

but they’ve all done their jobs better than me.

The question for me is who trains those wives?

© Lawrencealot – December 26, 2013

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Awdl

Awdl
An awdl is a Welsh ode. Awdlau (that’s the plural) come in twelve different varieties, and it will take me a while to get through them all (if I ever do). All the poems on this page will be awdlau. 
There are 24 Welsh standard verse forms altogether. The other twelve are made up of eight kinds of englyn and four kinds of cywydd.
One important reservation: I believe all Welsh-language awdlau are required to exhibit some kind of cynghanedd in every line. In the descriptions below, this will not be mentioned (and in the examples, I will not attempt it). It is just too difficult and complicated for us non-Celts. If you really want to get to grips with this, I recommend the book Singing in Chains (see books page). 
As Confucius once remarked, the page of a dozen awdlau begins with a single form:
Hir a Thoddaid
According to Singing in Chains, the Hir a Thoddaid is the most common form of awdl nowadays. Here’s a silly example:
Lovesick
I take back what I said about your knees –
They hardly knock at all. Forgive me, please.
My meaning and my words are chalk and cheese.
I love to cuddle you. You’re not obese.
I have caught a rare disease of the heart
When I see you I start to want to sneeze.
I didn’t mean to speak ill of your chin.
In pointing out it emphasised how thin
Your body was, I thought I’d make you grin.
Is paying you such compliments a sin?
I see I’ll have to discipline my tongue –
The songs I would have sung must stay within.
I’m sure that I did not suggest your arms’
Uneven lengths failed to augment your charms.
Believe me, love, they caused me no alarms.
I’ve seen far worse on girls from local farms.
A little skewness often calms me down.
So please, my love, don’t send round the gendarmes.
I never did complain about your nose,
Although it’s quite surprising that you chose
That singular proboscis. I suppose
It makes you quite distinctive, like your clothes.
More easily described in prose than verse,
You’re better active, worse when in repose.
And darling, though it’s true I said you smelt,
I meant “of roses”, honestly! I’d spelt
It out clearly. I don’t know why you felt
That I’d been less than kind. You’re sweet, you’re svelte,
My poor heart raced when I knelt to request
Your hand. Your bum’s the best I’ve ever felt.
Each line has 10 syllables – in no particular metre, though I seem to have lapsed into iambic pentameter here. All lines of each stanza, except for the penultimate one, rhyme together in the conventional way. The penultimate line rhymes with them all in an unconventional way – its seventh, eighth or ninth syllable contains the rhyme. Furthermore, the word at the end of the penultimate line rhymes with a word somewhere in the middle of the last line. In the first stanza above, for example, there’s disease/sneeze and heart/start
The first 4 lines are the hir, and the last two are the toddaid (which mutates to thoddaid when you put the phrase together, due to the endearing pecularities of the Welsh language). The hir can have 2 lines or 6, rather than the 4 used here, but all its lines must always rhyme together. 
The books by Hopgood and Skelton agree about this form, and that’s good enough for me. Some sites on the web say the last line should have only 9 syllables, but I suspect they are wrong. 
And if you don’t believe CYNGHAHEDD makes this difficult poetry to write, with the expertise to determine is praiseworthy or even correct limited to a few Welsh and a very few other poets, take a look at what Wikipedia has to say about it

I have found little joy in reading such poems as they almost always appear stilted.

 

So I am (after viewing others) going with Bob Newman’s interpretation and recommendation – let those writing in English write enjoyable poetry.

Restated specification for Hir a Thoddaid:

A poem of either 6 or 8 lines.

Stanzaic:  Consisting of a hir (being either a mono-rhymed quatrain or sestet,

                   and a toddaid which is a couplet with interlaced rhyme.

Isosyllabic: 10 syllables

Rhymed: aaaa(ab)(ba)

 

Here is my example poem:

Crinoline Tease (Hir a Thoddaid)

 

You dressed in fancy silks and satin clothes 
and feather boas, hats, and nylon hose, 
and crinoline as well to augment those. 
and not in frequently you would expose 
a flash of flesh to decompose a guest. 
I liked that best, and therefore I proposed. 

Somehow you liked me wearing my plainclothes. 
You ate me up with eyes just like a doe’s. 
When we’re together we forget our woes 
I thrill to sit nearby when you repose 
and lean and touch you with my nose and lips 
and touch your breast and hips while still you pose. 

© Lawrencealot – December 26, 2013

 

Related Welsh Form are HERE.

 
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