Ovi

Indian Verse

Ovi is commonly known as 12th century folk-songs of the Maranthi Region of India which expressed love, social irony and heroic events.
Tukaram, a 17th Century Maranthi Poet wrote:
Because I could not lie
I named my dog “God”.
Startled at first,
Soon he was smiling
Then dancing!
Now he won’t even bite.
Do you suppose this might work 
On people, too?
The Ovi is:
• stanzaic, written in any number of 4 line stanzas.
• syllabic, 8-8-8-(less than 8 ) syllables
• rhymed, with L1, L2, L3 mono-rhymed L4 unrhymed. aaax, x being unrhymed.

Roly Poly by Judi Van Gorder

The big toothed tot with golden hair
picked up a bug on Sister’s dare, 
it rolled into a ball right there 
and won her springtime heart.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1211
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Truckers life

Trucker’s Life (Ovi)

Poppa longed for the open road
not just because the bank was owed;
always contented when he rode,
he had a land to see.

There is no state that he’d not seen!
East-coast to west, and in between,
t
here’s nothing like that rolling scene
to make one ‘preciate.

The Pennsylvania rolling hills,
the Gary Indiana mills,
the Alcan Highway winter thrills
all were a joy to see.

He loved Montana’s open sky
and Kansas when the corn was high
the Rockies when the roads are dry,
and then he met my mom.

He needs time with his wife and son
so now his gallivanting’s done
but our vacations sure are fun,
he knows just where to go!

© Lawrencealot – February 15, 2015

Visual template

This one for a stanza with a 6 syllable short line.

Ovi

Letrilla

Spanish Poetry

The Letrilla is a short strophic form from 16th century Spain that is usually humorous or satirical. The form can sometimes be found in religious verse also. This lyrical verse is written with a theme refrain of any number of lines which usually begins and ends the poem.

 

The Letrilla is:

  • strophic, any number of lines contained in the strophe.
  • syllabic, often written in 6 or 8 syllable lines. Lines should be short and approximate length.
  • composed with a refrain which begins and ends the piece.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme would depend on the length of the strophe. The theme refrain AA (or however many lines) and the strophe rhyme is often envelope rhyme AA bccb ba AA or AA bcccba AA etc .
Letrilla by Francesco de Quevedo 1580-1645

Poderosos caballero
es don Dinero

Madre, yo al oro me humillo
el es mi amante y mi amado,
pues de puro enamorado,
anda contino amarillo;
que pues doblon o sencillo,
hace todo cuanto quiero
poderoso caballero
es don Dinero.

 

 

Letrilla by Francesco de Quevedo
translated by Judi Van Gorder

A powerful horseman
is Mr. Money.
Mother, because of gold I make a fool of myself,
It is my lover and my beloved
because it is purest love.
it walks a golden path.
Whether complicated or simple
It does all that I want
A powerful horseman
is Mr. Money.

 

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1866
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

My example 

Fresh as a Daisy  (Letrilla) 

I’ve written doggerel a lot.
Purposely?  Well, usually not.
While I’m smart as a whip
when I write about June
and I rhyme it with moon
it is sometimes a slip
not a purposeful quip,
just the best that I’ve got.
I’ve written doggerel a lot.
Purposely?  Well, usually not. 

© Lawrencealot – February 15, 2015

Kouta

Japanese Poetry

The Kouta 小唄 (little or short song) was a popular Japanese verse form of the 16th century.

The Kouta is:
• a poem in 4 lines.
• syllabic, written in lines of alternating 7-5-7-5 syllables or 7-7-7-5 syllables.

three little girls dressed alike
small pink polka dots on white
ribbons tie up pony tails
sisters smile polite
–jvg

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1132
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Untitled (Kouta)

three old men sitting at the bar
grumbling ’bout the things that are
the good thing is they can’t go far
momma has the car

© Lawrencealot – February 13, 2015

Scifaiku

The SciFaiku is what the name implies, science fiction haiku an invented verse form introduced by Tom Brinck in 1995. Scifaiku combines science fiction themes with the some of the elements of the haiku.

The Scifaiku is:
• minimal, in the moment with human insight.
• written with a haiku frame, normally, 17 syllables or less. The poem can be written in the classic 3 lines of 5-7-5 or a variation of line and syllable count. (because of the nature of the subject some techinical words could exceed the standard syllable count per line therefore, as long as minimal amount of words and syllables are used to get the point across, there could be more or less than 17 syllables in the poem.
• composed with a single concept or image.
• written with “uncluttered and direct words”.
• written in the moment.
• finding the Ah-ha, light bulb realization through the understanding of the possibilities of science.

poets dance with words
cyber ballroom fills with song
line dancing in space
-judi van gorder

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2193
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Untitled (Scifaiku)

big bang disputed
universe is infinite
it matters not

© Lawrencealot – February 12, 2015

Varselle

Varselle: Invented by Linda Varsell Smith.
Centered or flush. 8 line stanzas.
Rhymed or not.
Unrhymed syllable or word count: 2-3-4-3-5-5-4-6.
Rhymed: 2a-3b-4a-3b-5c-5b-4c-6a.
Can add stanzas or stand alone.

Oregon Spring

Raining–

Spring’s too wet!
Hail is straining
patience, yet
sometimes sun streaks through.
Sun turns chills to sweat.
What can we do?
Confusion remaining.

For Kip

Someone
remember
our dear passed son.
Heart-ember
love-warming through years.
Can’t disremember
the joys or tears
from grief of everyone.

http://www.rainbowcommunications.org/velvet/forms/
My Thanks to Linda Varsell Smith for her contributions above.

Restated Specifications

The Varsell is an ambiguous form invented by Linda Varsell Smith.
It is stanzaic, consisting of any number of eight line stanzas.
It is either rhymed or not.
It is either syllabic or word-based.
It is either centered or left justified.
The number of (syllables or words) per line is 2/3/4/3/5/5/4/6
If rhymed the rhymed scheme must be ababcbca

My example

Don’t Feed the Cat (Varselle)

That brat!
We do feed
our funny furry cat;
we do indeed,
and mother nature does too!
So please neighbors, take heed,
he’ll beg from you.
Ignore him, he might get fat.

© Lawrencealot – February12, 2015

Visual template

Varsell

Tho Bon Chu

Vietnamese

Tho Bon Chu or Four Word Verse is written as its name implies, measuring the number of words per line rather than syllables.

The Tho Bon Chu is:
• stanzaic, written in a series of couplets.
• measured by the number of words in the line, each line has 4 word.
• rhymed, tonal rhyme in 1 of 2 distinct pattern and often end rhymed at the poets discretion. w=word

When end rhymed.
w ♭w a#
w # w a♭
or
w # w a♭
w ♭w a#
When not end rhymed
w ♭w #
w # w ♭
or
w # w ♭
w ♭w #

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2058#bon
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

Since I have no notion about the Vietnamese tonal qualities for words,
I have anglicized the rules to interpret Sharp tones as end-stressed words and Flat tones, as not.

Here’s my attempt

Hollering  (Tho Bon Chu)

Sounds normal to shout
with children at home.

To shout in office
is not my suggestion.

© Lawrencealot – February 11, 2015

 

 

William Kenneth Keller, writing on Allpoety as Shades of Bill added this comment and poem with do much to explain the concept which I merely relegated to stress.   I am including work as it really make things make a little more sense. 

The idea of tonality in poetry intrigues me! So here is my humble take on this. In English a word’s pitch comes two ways: stress, (rise and fall) and the tonality assigned to vowel sounds. (long or short)
Here is how I would assess your first line:
‘ow’ in ‘sounds’ would define the baseline for line. (This brings up an interesting point: you can have a baseline that changes line to line, or an overall baseline carried throughout the poem; the latter obviously far more difficult than the former.)
‘or’ in ‘normal’ should be flatter than baseline. (It is: the voice drops slightly.)
‘ooh’ in ‘to’ should sound at same pitch as baseline’. (It seems close enough.)
‘ow’ in ‘shout’ should be sharper than baseline. (It is identical. As an example, the ‘ee’ in ‘sleep’ is pitched slightly higher than the ‘ow’ in ‘sounds when voiced.)

 

Shades of Bill – Hi, Larry.
So I took a light-hearted stab at it:

She walks too stiff
Like an old lady

Talks like a sailor
Too long at sea

Looks like an angel
And so I stay

Might not be suitable as an example, but it does seem to have that necessary rise and fall to it.
I may try to give it another go, but regardless, the idea of pitch and tonality is going in my Batman Utility Belt!

Take care,
Bill.

Folía

Spanish Poetry
The Folía is a nonsensical or a ridiculous poem, originating in 16th century Spain, probably influenced by a Portuguese dance song. 

The Folía is:
• stanzaic, written in any # of quatrains.
• syllabic, 8 syllables lines or shorter.
• rhymed, rhyme scheme abab cdcd etc.
• ridiculous or nonsensical.

Silly Willy by Judi Van gorder

In old 16th century Spain
when poets felt a bit silly
they’d dance circles round in the rain
and write rhymed verse willy nilly.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1025#folia
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Bump and Grind (Folía)

A kangaroo on roller skates
and polar bear on skis
were clumsy when they went on dates
excuse them if you please.

© Lawrencealot – February 11, 2015

Cadae

Cadae is an experimental Western poetry form similar to the Fib. While the Fib is based on the Fibonacci sequence, the cadae is based on the number Pi. The word “cadae” is the alphabetical equivalent of the first five digits of Pi, 3.1415.[1]

The form of a cadae is based on Pi on two levels. There are five stanzas, with 3, 1, 4, 1, and 5 lines each, respectively for a total of fourteen lines in the poem. Each line of the poem also contains an appropriate number of syllables. The first line has three syllables, the second has one, the third has four, and so on, following the sequence of Pi as it extends infinitely. [2]

Rachel Hommel wrote an untitled “Cadaeic Cadae”, which uses the cadae form as explained above, and adds a level of complexity to it wherein the number of letters in each word represents a digit of Pi. [3]

Michael Keith wrote a “Cadaeic Cadenza”, called “Near a Raven” in the Cadenza poetry form (also sometimes called Cadence), where the number of letters in each word represents a digit of Pi.[1]

Pasted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadae

As a name, cadae is the alphabetical equivalent to the first five digits of the transcendental number pi (3.1415…). Pi, often represented as π, is a mathematical constant that is the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter approximately equal to the number 3.14 or, to fourteen places, 3.1415926535897. In poetry, these numbers have been applied to line and stanza lengths, resulting in, yet again, a cross between haiku and sonnet. Here’s an example:
Butterfly
lands
on butterfly
bush.
A starving man eats
maggots, dies. When two days later he
is found
new maggots have begun
hatching in his mouth.
Which image
will you take to bed
like a lover for the first time
touching and turning it all through night?
Which will be there when you wake?

Pasted from http://www.thebakerypoetry.com/on-writing-fibonacci-and-cadae-poems/

My example

Read It Anyway (Cadae)

I try to
write
what people will
read.
Often times I fail.
Frequently I get carried away
by all
the constraints of a form,
become didactic
in the cause,
lose all pretense of
using poetic devices, 
and end up with something that only
few folks will willingly read.

© Lawrencealot – February 10, 2015

Caccia

Caccia in Italian,Catch in English, is a hunting song of the 14th and 15th centuries. It originally included two parts for voices who hunt each other. The lyrics were normally accompanied by a musical instrument. 

The Caccia or Catch is:
• known to have been composed with random 11, 7 and 5 syllable lines.
• usually carries a refrain at the end of the stanza.
• composed favoring onomatopoeia, incomplete phrases and the exclamatory statement.
• lyrics framed by stanza and rhyme at the discretion of the poet.

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1156
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

#284 CACCIA
9-9-98

The only hunting I do
is follow the soul’s
twists through corridors of sorrow and laughter

The wild game is illusive
shyly mocking, chase
cantering, cleaving, crocheting and rocking.

Resting in sleep, rising in
gallop, girding, it
grips, rides my laughter, test my pain, leaps over

river-wide splits in the sea.
Peer down O soul! Peer!
Set me aside in a still water pool, clear

from the maples of autumn
hung from the boughs
glimpsed through surface of still lakes, silent waters.

I will be gone, I will be
the reds and the golds
are but leftovers of greens, greens feed the beasts

Ah, beasts I will leave alone.
They deserve peace more
then the bee buzz of my soul, quiet refrains.

Pasted from <http://janhaag.com/PODes267-299.html#caccia>

My example

Peaceful Prescription (Caccia)

Uncertain, and unconcerned I set upon
my undaunted daily walk.
Oh, the things I see.

Doves and blue jays and their friends converse with me,
they tweet and twitter, perhaps
just because of me.

How many years I thought I was too busy
to wander willfully. My
doctor says I should.

© Lawrencealot – February 10, 2015

Ocarina – Rhymed

I have no idea who created this form. Thanks to Sara Gosa of Allpoetry.com for bringing it to my attention.
I can only tell you that it was published in the January 25, 1912 edition of New Age, and was written by Author Tulloch Cull.

To Anna Pavlova (Ocarina)
(In her dance “Le Cygne ” Musique de Saint-Saëns.)
I.
There came to me a vision of sweet song
Borne faintly forward on melodious streams,
A white Chimaera such as stirs the dreams
Of men, who sleep in solitudes and long
To people the dead wastes with strange desire
And breathe between the lips of ancient Death
Stretched mummified in deserts that new breath
That should revive them with its living fire.
II.
White was the vision, white as fiercest fire
And paler far its face than pallid Death,
Begotten of that brood, the Swan’s desire
Raised from frail Leda with its hissing breath.
And as it came its superhuman song
Sang of all those, whom wide relentless streams
Divide from their beloved, towards whom they long,
But whom they ne’er may clasp except in dreams.
III.
They strain to one another in their dreams
But never hear their lovers’ silent song
Pass spectrelike with gliding feet along
The halls of Sleep to Lethe’s stealthy streams
Till conies Old Age, a fouler foe than Death,
To mar the house of their divine desire
And smother with white ashes their young fire
Stifling their bodies’ perfumes with his breath.
IV.
Who of us mortals with ephemeral breath
That saw the vision, did not straight desire
To pass from perfect happiness to death
A holocaust of joy within the fire beneath
That from your cloudlike eyelids streams.
Having for elegy your supreme song
I would have died your death and passed to dreams
On that white breast, for which I longed so long.
V.
Half goddess and half swan, you seemed to long
With yearning eyes for those immortal dreams
Of far Olympus, where Peneus streams
Through Tempe’s hallowed vale. Yet in the song
Of feet and face and form I saw the fire
Of love for men, whose evanescent breath
Lends charm to wayward pleasures, watched by Death,
Who casts a glamour on short-lived desire.
VI.
All mortal sufferings and vain desire
Wept from your eyes and shook your tortured breath.
Yea, goddess though you were, the immortal fire
That shone from your white shape grew dim as Death.
I questioned of your Sorrow-Did you long
For Youth’s brief summer passed in rhythmic dreams
By winding ways of water, where the song
Of many birds mixed with the murmuring streams?
VII.
But though no answer pierced the plash of streams
Your arms that wavered swan-like seemed to long
And beckon for some mystery, which song
Might not reveal lying hid beyond our dreams.
Was it eternal youth, that your last breath
Invoked with prayers so passionate, that fire
Rekindled in those eyes, whose last desire
Was unto life, till clanked the feet of Death?
VIII.
For as you felt the drear approach of Death,
Your limbs relaxed and from your eyes the fire
Fled fainting forth : You drew one sobbing breath
That shook your shuddering wings, and your desire
Quailed before Death : Your hair, where darkness dreams,
Where Moon and Stars hold festival along
With queenly Night, fell forward in dark streams
About your face, and silenced was your song.
ENVOY.
Anna, my dreams find voice within the song
That from the fire of your sweet footsteps streams.
Though dreams and breath and song may pass along
Death’s ways, yet my desire defieth Death.
Author Notes
This poem appears in the January 25, 1912 edition of New Age. Found at library.brown .edu

Pasted from http://allpoetry.com/poem/11882810-To-Anna-Pavlova–Ocarina–by-A.-Tulloch-Cull

The Ocarina – Rhymed
A sestina discipline using 8 lines per verse and a 4 line enjoy for a 68 line poem

MUST be used to write a rhyming poem.
Its structure schematic is
12345678
86571243
31426587
75682134
43218765
57864312
24137856
68753421
With the envoy:
I corrected the occurrence of the words to create complete rhyme which the sample poem did not possess.
31 / 28 / 74 / 65Giving couplet internal rhyme and alternating end-rhyme

Rhyme scheme: Alternating envelope and alternate rhyme.
Rhyme pattern: 
1st abbacddc
2nd cdcdabab
3rd baabdccd
4th dcdcbaba
5th abbacddc
6th cdcdabab
7th baabdccd
8th dcdcbaba
Envoy:
(b/a)
(b/c)
(d/a)
(d/c)

 

Related forms: Bina, Canzone, Decrina, Newman Sestina, OcarinaOcarina – RhymedQuartina, Quintina, Sestina, Sestina – RhymedSidney’s Double Sestina, Tritina 

My Example

Christians for Breakfast (Ocarinai – Rhymed)

When people meet for breakfast just to pray
you know already they’ve a certain mind
a homogeneous group (all of one kind)
with similar beliefs upon display.
While all may not attend with spirit pure,
proclaiming Christ as lord still seems the rule.
Electorate they think they have to fool;
avowing unity makes men secure

I do not need to pray to be secure
I need a leader capable to rule.
He must embrace the tainted and the pure
and not in public act like such a fool.
The fact that all denominations pray
and deem they’re right, brings logic to my mind.
Is faith a no-lose place in which to play?
I denigrate them not, but I’m just kind.

I tolerate religions that are kind
and ask for things of goodness when they pray
but not those bringing evil into play
It’s dominance of others that I mind.
It’s easy to endorse the golden rule
and teaching benefits of staying pure
but Islam’s aim is clearly to secure
a dominance envisioned by a fool.

Now president Barrack has played the fool.
In race nor religion is Barry pure
so he had attributes to let him rule
as mediator making folks secure,
instead he’s pumped up strife in people’s mind.
Attacking Christians who came here to pray
for focusing on Moslems who aren’t kind-
revenge for the crusades is just fair play

By bringing those crusades now into play
(which were the Churches own response in kind)
to suppression of Christian life and mind
The Christians found it did no good to pray.
Nor will it ever. Men to be secure
must charge with force against the raging fool
who deems a pretend Caliphate must rule,
and fantasizes gift of virgins pure.

When extant spirituality’s pure,
one needs no fables fostered by a fool.
Connection to something makes one secure,
requiring no support from dogma’s rule.
A church is often but a place to play
at being good, where one can get a kind
of forgiveness for oft becoming prey
to urges which slip unbidden into mind

I don’t need dogma policing my mind
I know what’s right in thought and work and play,
and to know that, I never had to pray.
I really doubt that dogma makes one kind.
One’s character makes him a prince or fool.
Without a heaven I feel quite secure,
and fearing hell does not keep people pure
Dispense with dogma, let your conscious rule

The Koran preaches violence as the rule
all power to the Imam to secure
Though raised in Islam, Barry thought he’d fool
the public spouting eloquence and pure
nonsense about a change of different kind
none thought he’d bring religion into play.
Does evil infiltration come to mind?
‘Twould not be bad if all he did was pray

I did not mind the breakfast meet to pray;
‘Twas less than kind to put such hate in play
He fosters pure dissent, the bloody fool
Men will secure themselves from Islam rule.

© Lawrencealot – February 9, 2015