Wreathed and Un-wreathed Sestet

Wreathed and Unwreathed Sestets

Wreathed poetry is simply a natural blending of English poetry with the Celtic Welsh. Its creator George Herbert was born into a wealthy artistic family in Wales and later was educated in Trinity College, Cambridge and was unpublished until after his death. It is believed that his poem A Wreath was inspired by the Welsh form Englyn cryrch which uses an internal rhyme scheme with an external one and gives a couplet scheme of:

x. x. x. x. x. x. x. a.

x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.

The red in the second line indicates that the internal rhyme can be anywhere in the first part of second line and can be a repeat word rather than a rhyme. that is the poets decision. There is no internal rhyme in the first line, It was later that poets saw the possibilities and created the sestet with a rhyme scheme of:

x. x. x. x. x. x. x. a.

x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.

x. b. x. x. x. x. x. a.

x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.

x. b. x. x. x. x. x. a.

x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.

Here is an example of that form

Not Nerd

A simple envelope is not hard

What is hard is finding words

Words are a problem to the bard

Because bards are never nerds

As for nerdish be on your guard

Yes guard against all lollard’s 

Anon

Un-wreathed Poetry

Later poets realised that some Irish forms led with an internal form and from that was born Un-wreath poetry, simply the reverse of Wreath in that the first line starts with an internal rhyme with the second external and so on, there being no seventh line there is no external rhyme, giving this sestet a basic rhyme scheme of:

x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.

x. b. x. x. x. x. x. a.

x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.

x. b. x. x. x. x. x. a.

x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.

x. x. x. x. x. x. x. a.

Pasted from <http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/2009Challenge/form15.html

My thanks for the fine body of work maintained on thepoetsgarret

Rhyme Scheme: a(a/b)(b/a)(a/b)(b/a)(a/b)

My example

Hurry Earlier (Wreathed Sestet)

Hurry Earlier

“I think I’ve water on my brain –
all my hurry in vain to night.
And yet tonight with all this rain
I’ll miss the train though it’s in sight.
The lights shine brightly in the train.
Wasted time caused this pain and plight.”

© Lawrencealot – March 3, 2015

Visual template

Note: although the template if for a poem of 8 syllables, length is up to the poet.

Wreathed Sestet

Wreathed and Un-wreathed Quatrain

Wreathed and Unwreathed Quatrains

Wreathed poetry is simply a natural blending of English poetry with the Celtic Welsh. Its creator George Herbert was born into a wealthy artistic family in Wales and later was educated in Trinity College, Cambridge and was unpublished until after his death. It is believed that his poem A Wreath was inspired by the Welsh form Englyn cryrch which uses an internal rhyme scheme with an external one and gives a couplet scheme of:

x. x. x. x. x. x. x. a.
x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.

The red in the second line indicates that the internal rhyme can be anywhere in the first part of second line and can be a repeat word rather than a rhyme. that is the poets decision. There is no internal rhyme in the first line, It was later that poets saw the possibilities and created the quatrain with a rhyme scheme of:

x. x. x. x. x. x. x. a.
x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.
x. x. x. x. x. x. x. a.
x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.

Here is an example of that form by George Herbert: 

A Wreath

A wreathed garland of deserved praise, 
Of praise deserved, unto thee I give, 
I give to thee, who knowest all my wayes, 
My crooked winding wayes, wherein I live, 

Wherein I die, not live : for life is straight, 
Straight as a line, and ever tends to thee, 
To thee, who art more farre above deceit, 
Then deceit seems above simplicitie. 

Give me simplicitie, that I may live, 
So live and like, that I may know thy wayes, 
Know them and practise them : then shall I give 
For this poore wreath, give thee a crown of praise.

George Herbert (1593 – 1633)

Un-wreathed Poetry

Later poets realised that some Irish forms led with an internal form and from that was born Un-wreathed poetry, simply the reverse of Wreathed in that the first line starts with an internal rhyme with the second external and so on, there being no fifth line there is no external rhyme, giving it a basic rhyme scheme of:

x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.
x. x. x. x. x. x. x. a.
x. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.
x. x. x. x. x. x. x. a.

Wreath Quatrain

You are all alone and the future’s looking bleak
But will that bleakness last until the dawn
Pray before dawn your love again will speak.
What good is luck when your lover has gone

Ryter Roethicle

Pasted from http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/2012Challenge/form2.html
My thanks ot Ryter Roethicle of thepoetsgarret

Rhyme Scheme Wreathed Quatrain: a(a/b)(b/a)(a/b)

My example

 

Rain’s Glow (Wreathed Quatrain)

Rains Glow

 

How sweet it was to look below
and view the show below the clouds.
The multi-colored shrouds I know
was heaven’s glow to please vast crowds.

How fortunate, I thought was I
having a chance to fly above
prism hues of what must apply
when fairies paint the sky with love.

A refraction of each photon
off drop impinged upon, now spray
colors everyway from dawn
until the moisture’s dried away.

© Lawrencealot – March 1, 2015

Visual Template

Note, although the template is for an eight syllable poem, this is not a mandated requirement.

Wreathed Quatrain

Wreathed and Un-wreathed Octave

Wreathed and Un-wreathed Octave

 

Wreathed poetry is simply a natural blending of English poetry with the Celtic Welsh. Its creator George Herbert was born into a wealthy artistic family in Wales and later was educated in Trinity College, Cambridge and was unpublished until after his death. It is believed that his poem A Wreath was inspired by the Welsh form Englyn cryrch which uses an internal rhyme scheme with an external one and gives a couplet scheme of:

 

 

  1. x. x. x. x. x. x. a.
  2. a. x. x. x. x. x. b.

 

The red in the second line indicates that the internal rhyme can be anywhere in the first part of second line and can be a repeat word rather than a rhyme. that is the poets decision. There is no internal rhyme in the first line, It was later that poets saw the possibilities and created the octave with a rhyme scheme of:

 

 

  1. x. x. x. x. x. x. a.
  2. a. x. x. x. x.x. b.
  3. b. x. x. x. x.x. a.
  4. a. x. x. x. x.x. b.
  5. b. x. x. x. x.x. c.
  6. c. x. x. x. x.x. d.
  7. d. x. x. x. x.x. c.
  8. c. x. x. x. x.x. d.

 

Here is an example of that form

 

 

Shrouded Thoughts

 

Must I wait one more day to speak to you
Tell you of my eternal love and desire to share.
Everything I dare you know I will pursue
In that pursuit, there is nothing I will not dare.
Knowing you care, certain of you wanting me.
Especially of being betrayed in the recent past
Now that is past even more I need certainty
Are you my certainty and will our love last?

Ryter Roethicle

 

Un-wreathed Octave

 

Later poets realised that some Irish forms led with an internal form and from that was born Un-wreathed poetry, simply the reverse of Wreathed in that the first line starts with an internal rhyme with the second external and so on, there being no fifth line there is no external rhyme, giving it a basic rhyme scheme of:

 

 

  1. b. x. x. x. x.x. a.
  2. a. x. x. x. x.x. b.
  3. b. x. x. x. x.x. a.
  4. c. x. x. x. x.x. b.
  5. d. x. x. x. x.x. c.
  6. c. x. x. x. x.x. d.
  7. d. x. x. x. x.x. c.
  8. x. x. x. x. x. x. d.

 

Pasted from <http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/2009Challenge/form8.html
My thanks to Ryter Roethicle of thepoetsgarret

 

My example

Homeostasis (Wreathed Octave)
 
The water from the snow today
is stored away in mountains high
so we’re not dry come late in May.
Don’t damn the grey bleak winter sky
I don’t deny fair skies are good,
but fields and wood would suffer drought
were they without the snow that stood;
because it could we’re not without.
 
© Lawrencealot – March 1, 2015

 

Visual Template

Wreathed Octave