Séadna mheadhanach

• Séadna mheadhanach is:
○ the same as the Séadna.
○ except the 1st and 3rd lines of the quatrain are 3 syllable words and the 2nd and 4th lines are 2 syllable words.
x x x x x (x x a)
x a x x x (x b)
x x x b x (x x c)
x b x c x (x b)

Syllabic Silliness by Judi Van Gorder

When writing verse be attendant,
confidant in the stillness
with syllable count dependant,
drill and chant shunning shrillness.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/1168-seadna-seadna-mor-seadna-mheadhanach/
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

2nd Childhood (Form: Séadna Mheadhanach )

Observe how gramps does emulate
what kids create in youthful
wonder at almost everything.
He thinks that time is fruitful.

That youth he’d yearn to peculate
this late in lifetime’s reserve
because there’s something wonderful
in whatever they observe.

© Lawrencealot – January 21, 2015

Visual Template

Seadna Mheadhanch

 

Englyn byr cwca

Englyn byr cwca is a shortened crooked rhyme and is not one of the 24 Official Welsh Meters.

Englyn bry cwca is:
• stanzaic, written in any number of tercets.
• syllabic, 7-10-6 syllable lines.
• rhymed, rhyme scheme aba, cdc, etc. The L2 end rhyme appears internally midway in L3.
x x x x x x a
x x x x x x x x x b
x x b x x a

A Look Forward byJudi Van Gorder

Vows, “in sickness and in health”,
they’re hard to see when strong and young in love,
time is part of the wealth.
But years turn and visions blur,
the body slows and vitality goes,
hopes and woes are deferred.

Here we are in winter’s dawn,
through grace or luck our days continue bright.
We shun the night upon
which one life will first depart.
Only “death and taxes” they say, “are sure”.
mature, we play our part.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=960\
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

AM and PM (Englyn bry cwca)

Relentlessly time moves on
with urging when we’re young; we’d like a blitz
until it’s almost gone.

In the winter of life’s year
time slows our body making us aware
we ought share our lives cheer.

© Lawrencealot – December 9, 2014

Visual template

Englyn bry cwca

Hybridanelle

What is a Hybridanelle?

First I shall give you my restated specifications, then present the original instructions by the inventor, Erin Thomas, aka Zahhar on Allpoetry.

The Hybridanell is:
A poem of 38 lines,
A combination of the Villanell and the Terzanelle,
Stanzaic, Consisting of 10 tercet stanzas, followed by 2 quatrains
Rhymed with one of two patterns: where subscripted capitals indicate refrained lines. Rhyme may be of any type, true, false, associative, assonance, consonance, etc..
Type A pattern:
 A1bA2 C1D1C2 abA1 cE1D1 abA2 eF1E1 abA1 fG1F1 abA2 gH1G1 abA1A2 hC1H1C2
Type B pattern:
A1B1A2 C1dC2 bE1B1 cdC1 eF1E1 cdC2  fG1F1 cdC1 gH1G1 cdC2 hA1H1A2 cdC1C2
Line length: at poet’s discretion
Meter: at poet’s discretion
=================================================

The hybridanelle (hi ‘brid an ,nell) is a 38 line poetic form that is a combination of the Italian villanelle and Lewis Turco’s terzanelle. It is created by interlacing the villanelle and terzanelle stanzaic structures together, kind of like shuffling cards, where the stanzas of each form are the individual cards. This means the villanelle and terzanelle refrains and end-line schemes leapfrog one another in the hybridanelle.

Instead of the end-line rhyme used by the villanelle and terzanelle forms, the hybridanelle’s end-line scheme may use other types of parallelism, phonemic or associative. As such, in the hybridanelle, the end-line scheme is exactly that, an “end-linescheme”, not a “rhyme scheme”. I have posted an article, “Some Alternatives to Rhyme”, that discusses and exemplifies many phonological alternatives to rhyme. I intend for the hybridanelle to be very approachable as an English poetic form rather than being yet another hand-me-down from another language that does not share the linguistic characteristics of English. Rhyme is one of the most limiting strictures imposed upon English poetry from languages such as Latin, Greek, and French.

There are two varieties of hybridanelle, Type A and Type B. The Type A hybridanelle begins with the villanelle’s opening tercet and ends with the terzanelle’s closing quatrain; the Type B hybridanelle, the inverse of the Type A, begins with the terzanelle’s opening tercet and ends with the villanelle’s closing quatrain.

The most useful way I have found to clarify all the points of a poetic form is to enumerate them.

First there are three points general to both the Type A and B hybridanelles:
1. The hybridanelle is comprised of ten tercets and two closing quatrains, totaling twelve stanzas.
2. Lines may be of any length or meter within reason.
3. Hybridanelles may be written on any subject.
The remaining points are different depending on whether you’re writing a Type A or a Type B hybridanelle.

First, Type A:
A4.
The first line from the opening tercet is used again as the third line of the third and seventh tercets and the penultimate quatrain. The third line from the opening tercet is used again as the third line of the fifth and ninth tercets and as the fourth line of the penultimate quatrain.
A5.
The first line of the opening tercet begins the a end-line scheme, used by the first line of every odd numbered tercet along with the penultimate quatrain. The second line of the opening tercet begins the b end-line scheme, used by the second line of each odd numbered tercet along with the penultimate quatrain.
A6.
The first and third lines of the second tercet are used again as the second and fourth lines of the closing quatrain, and they use the C end-line scheme between them.
A7.
The even numbered tercets, starting with the fourth tercet, each refrains the second line form the preceding even numbered tercet as its third line. The first line of each of these tercets uses an end-line parallelism with its refrained line.
A8.
The third line of the closing quatrain refrains the second line of the last tercet and uses end-line parallelism between its first line and that refrain.
A shorthand notation can be used to clarify the above points. Like letters indicate the end-line scheme, and uppercase letters followed by a superscript numeric notation indicate the refrains: A1bA2, C1D1C2, abA1, cE1D1, abA2, eF1E1, abA1, fG1F1 abA2,gH1G1, abA1A2, hC1H1C2.

Now, for Type B:
B4.
The first and third lines of the opening tercet are used again as the second and fourth lines of the penultimate quatrain and use the A end-line scheme between them.
B5.
The odd numbered tercets, starting with the third tercet, each refrains the second line of the preceding odd numbered tercet as its third line. The first line of each of these tercets uses an end-line parallelism with its refrained line.
B6.
The third line of the penultimate quatrain refrains the second line from the ninth tercet and uses an end-line parallelism between its first line and that refrain.
B7.
The first line from the second tercet is used again as the third line of the fourth and eight tercets and the closing quatrain. The third line from the second tercet is used again as the third line of the sixth and tenth tercets and as the fourth line of the closing quatrain.
B8.
The first line of the second tercet begins a c end-line scheme, used by the first line of every even numbered tercet along with the closing quatrain. The second line of the second tercet begins a d end-line scheme, used by the second line of each even numbered tercet along with the closing quatrain.
The shorthand notation for the above points is as follows: A1B1A2, C1dC2, bE1B1,cdC1, eF1E1, cdC2, fG1F1 cdC1, gH1G1, cdC2, hA1H1A2, cdC1C2.

This information may be difficult to visualize without examples, so both the Type A and Type B hybridanelles are exemplified below with the shorthand notation for each type expanded out across the lines.

This first poem exemplifies the Type A hybridanelle:

Stormlight by Zahhar

formlesspoet/2008/04/stormlight.html

A1 Frantic flashes illustrate my view,
b   Random moments shot into the light;
A2 Thunder crushes every hope anew.
C1  I pass the night in a frail abandoned home,
D1 A weary vagrant teen deprived of will
C2 Awaiting the dawn within its quaking hold.
a   Visions strobe throughout the empty room,
b   Shadows briefly singed by every bolt;
A1 Frantic flashes illustrate my view.
d   I curl within my bag against the wall;
E1 There’s nothing left for the winds to rip from me,
D1 A weary vagrant teen deprived of will.
a   Etched amid the suffocating gloom,
b   Monster clouds roll black against the night;
A2 Thunder crushes every hope anew.
e   I’ve struggled to grasp what life could ever mean
F1 As memory and mind are stripped away;
E1 There’s nothing left for the winds to rip from me.
a   Leafless limbs are drawn in sepia hues;
b   Stark against the darkness of my thought,
A1 Frantic flashes illustrate my view.
f   I watch and listen, numb and half-aware,
G1 My slumber but vivid streaks of fitful dream,
F1 As memory and mind are stripped away.
a   Anxious waiting constantly resumes;
b   Shocked repeatedly from fugue to doubt,
A2 Thunder crushes every hope anew.
g   I try to manage what rest I can redeem,
H1 Protected from the storm by shifting frames,
G1 My slumber but vivid streaks of fitful dream.
a  Desolation roars the whole night through;
b  Forces seem to tear the world apart;
A1 Frantic flashes illustrate my view;
A2 Thunder crushes every hope anew.
h  Uncertain shadows pose in countless forms;
C1 I pass the night in a frail abandoned home,
H1 Protected from the storm by shifting frames,
C2 Awaiting the dawn within its quaking hold.

In this poem the end-line parallelisms used for the a and b schemes are assonance and consonance, respectively. The end-line parallelisms used for the remaining end-line schemes alternate between reverse rhyme (some of which is partial reverse rhyme) and frame rhyme.

Although a fixed meter is not a requirement of this form, a consistent meter or set of meters contributes greatly to the way the hybridanelle flows. This is a form of poetry that is not very forgiving of clumsy phraseologies or word flow. In this poem, the villanelle “weave” uses catalectic trochaic pentameter while the terzanelle weave uses a combination of iambic pentameter and iambic-anapestic pentameter.

This next poem exemplifies the Type B hybridanelle
Inhumation by Zahhar

formlesspoet/2008/03/inhumation.html

A1 locked wards cower in the distant gloom;
B1 grated windows pattern all my dreams;
A2 heavy haze distorts my heavy mood.
C1 my eyes are weary of watching faded lights;
d   i wait throughout the dismal night to hear
C2 the call of a rooster just beyond my sight.
b   silence is an ever-present drone;
E1 tempered springs betray my slightest move;
B1 grated windows pattern all my dreams.
c   these cinderblocks enfold my spirit in lime;
d   interred in tomblike walls of concrete halls,
C1 my eyes are weary of watching faded lights.
e   thoughts amid this broken darkness brood;
F1 restless motions lurk within the shade;
E1 tempered springs betray my slightest move.
c   this is the crypt where my rotting soul is set,
d   thus laid to rest beyond that twilight hail,
C2 the call of a rooster just beyond my sight.
f   time is fractured into mental shards,
G1 strewn against the darkness of my view;
F1 restless motions lurk within the shade.
c   and the images betray my heart with lies
d  that flash against my mind as crumbled hopes;
C1 my eyes are weary of watching faded lights.
g   here i watch them phase in empty hues,
H1 omens of a future laid in brick
G1 strewn against the darkness of my view.
c   this lucid static is comfort of a sort
d   that’s lost with every sunrise when i hear
C2 the call of a rooster just beyond my sight.
h   black within the slowly rising brume,
A1 locked wards cower in the distant gloom,
H1 omens of a future laid in brick;
A2 heavy haze distorts my heavy mood.
c   i dread the sound that will end another night,
d   a sound that seals my fate within this hell—
C1 my eyes are weary of watching faded lights—
C2 the call of a rooster just beyond my sight.

In this poem the end-line parallelisms used for the c and d schemes, which is the villanelle weave, is a pattern of partial rhyme, reverse rhyme, and frame rhyme. The end-line parallelisms used for the remaining end-line schemes, which is the terzanelle weave, alternate between assonance and alliteration.

These two hybridanelle examples use phonological parallelism for their end-line schemes. For an example of a hybridanelle that uses associative parallelism for its end-line scheme, see the poem “Legacy”, which was written after this article was originally written. With associative parallelism, words relate to one another through meaning. In “Legacy”, the parallelisms are synonymic (alike in meaning) and metonymic (related through attributes).

What makes this form fascinating is the way elaborate end-line schemes can be used to create sound and word patterns—moods—that are unprecedented, or at very least uncommon, in English poetry.

Because the villanelle and terzanelle refrains weave through alternating stanzas in the hybridanelle, there is more distance between the refrains in the hybridanelle than in the villanelle or terzanelle. This makes it much easier to setup new contexts for the refrained lines, which can give those lines a fresh feel every time they are repeated—I have had some people read my hybridanelles without even realizing there were refraining lines—Yet the power of the refrains is not at all lost. If anything their power is intensified because they do not overwhelm the reader or audience.

Although the hybridanelle is inspired by the established villanelle and terzanelle forms, the fact that the hybridanelle uses an open end-line scheme, rather than the fixed end-line rhyme scheme used by its predecessors, makes it an entirely new form with an whole spectrum of new possibilities.

Pasted from <http://formlesspoet.blogspot.com/2012/04/what-is-hybridanelle.html>

My example
Don’t Wait 55 Years (Hybridanelle)

When I was young I climbed to mountain peaks.
It was a hike, a thing I’d do for fun;
to do it now would surely take me weeks.

The view from up above left me inspired
for on the top I stood above the clouds.
When young a man can climb and not get tired.

I’m older now; my body’s come undone
I lack the strength to scale the mountain face.
It was a hike, a thing I’d do for fun;

I thought I’d have the time when I retired,
I’d spend my time away from milling crowds.
The view from up above left me inspired.

But old man time has put me in my place.
A sedentary life extracts a cost;
I lack the strength to scale the mountain face.

The upward view itself should be admired,
it’s now the mountain tops the clouds enshroud.
When young a man can climb and not get tired.

Endurance, vim, and strength itself are lost;
This elder has to pace himself too slow;
A sedentary life extracts a cost.

With young teammates ascent could be acquired
that’s not my way, although it is avowed
the view from up above left me inspired.

I’ll see such scenes as those in video;
I should have climbed more often as a youth.
This elder has to pace himself too slow;

I did what at the time I most desired –
a truth I guess, that can’t be disavowed.
When young a man can climb and not get tired.

I’m happy now, but getting long of tooth.
When I was young I climbed to mountain peaks.
I should have climbed more often as a youth.
to do it now would surely take me weeks.

When age conspires to make a man bone-tired
he’ll have to leave some fertile fields unploughed.
The view from up above left me inspired.
When young a man can climb and not get tired.

© Lawrencealot – October 13, 2014

A visual template

Hybridanelle

Octo

I found a few invented forms which appear to be exclusive to The Study and Writing of Poetry; American Women Poets Discuss Their Craft, 1983. The book is a collection of essays from 50 American women poets, each essay provides insights into a multitude of topics from poetic genres, stanzaic forms, to writing techniques. This book provided some addition insights and background information on several stanzaic forms that I thought I had researched fully. I liked this book, it pays attention to the details.

The Octo is an invented syllabic verse form introduced by James Neille Northe.

The Octo is:
○ an octastich, a poem in 8 lines.
○ syllabic, all lines are 8 syllables each.
○ rhymed ABCxxCBA, x being unrhymed.
○ written with L1 repeated as L8, L2 repeated as L7 and L3 repeated as L6.

Pasted fromhttp://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2008#anna

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Self-Plagirism  (Octo)

I don’t intend to say things twice.
If once is not enough, too bad
I put it out for you to hear.
I oft forget just what I’ve said,
then think it independently
I put it out for you to hear.
if once is not enough, too bad
I don’t intend to say things twice.

© Lawrencealot – October 2, 2014

Visual template

Octo

Tulip

Pathways for the Poet by  Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source… Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Tulip is an invented verse form, a tetrastich with a combination of metric patterns. It was introduced by Viola Gardener.

The Tulip is:
○ a tetrastich, a poem in 4 lines.
○ metric, L1 & L3 are iambic pentameter, L2 i dimeter, a spondee followed by an amphibrach and L4 is dimeter, an iamb followed by an amphibrach.
○ rhymed abab.
○ because of the amphibrach foot at the end of L2 & L4 they have feminine endings.
Starbucks by Judi Van Gorder

The price of java going up and up
Good God! Horrendous!
The cost of coffee is four bucks a cup.
The line, tremendous!

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My Example

Another Birthday (Tulip)

I hope you’re happy, laughing and content.
Hail! Years are mounting.
It’s more important how your day is spent
than annual counting.

© Lawrencealot – September 28, 2014

Visual Template

Tulip

Dr Stella

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. I have included the syllabic invented forms on a separate page. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• Dr Stella is a verse using sequential rhyme*. It was developed by James Gray in honor of Dr Stella Woodall who was at one time president of the American Poetry League and editor of a couple of poetry magazines.

The Dr Stella is:
an octave made up of 2 quatrains.
metered, alternating iambic tetrameter and trimeter.
rhymed, abcdabcd. L2 and L6 have feminine end words.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

*This is also known as external rhyme or remote rhyme.

My example

Nail-Biting (Dr Stella)

Two golden-agers in a room
complained about mate’s habits.
“It irritates and drives me mad,
I need to find relief”.
“I know the way to cure your groom

as I did mine, dad-nabbit. 
Do what I did to my old Brad
and simply hide his teeth.”

© Lawrencealot – September 6, 2014

Visual template

Dr Stella

ABC Poem Poetry Form

• ABC poem, a subgenre of the Alphabet Poem is sometimes used as a word game for children in which the child is asked to think up words in alphabetical order and write a poem using those words as the first word of each line. It is an Abecedarius without the history or the spiritual character. Each line of the poem begins with a sequential letter of the alphabet.

• Balancing Act by Judi Van Gorder
An acrobatic
bird with a blue
crown crossed over and
down the daunting
extended
facade
gripping the grate with
half-hearted
indolence.

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

There was an Old Lady

An old lady, I first thought
But then I looked again
Certainly she’s maybe not
Defined as old my friend.

Especially in times of later born –
Fine times in which we live.
Granted, that she does seem worn
Having always had to give.

I know she was a helpmate first,
Joining with her man each day,
Keeping order when the worst
Lean times came their way.

Mostly she performed
Necessary tasks
Often, when informed –
Probably unasked.

Quietly she made a life,
Raising children, teaching.
Steadily, her husband’s wife
Taking without over-reaching.

Usual days would end in prayer,
Verses would be read you bet.
Wondrous things we not yet there;
X-rays weren’t invented yet.

Yes, she pre-dated bodice rippers,
Zones for buses, even zippers.

Abecedarius Poetry Form

Abecedarius is a lyrical poem composed as an acrostic employing the poetic device of the first letters of its lines forming an alphabet. To use the alphabet in a unique manner is the creative challenge of this genre, other than the obvious of finding words for the letters x and z.

Alphabetic acrostics first appear in Hebrew religious poetry found in the Old Testament. It seems that using letters of the alphabet as the initial letter of each line was thought by ancient cultures to connect the human with the divine. This device was considered a conduit to God and was commonly used in prayers, hymns and oracles.

According to the Harper Collins Study Bible; 1993, one variant of the Abecedarius is found beginning with Psalm 9 and continuing through Psalm 10:18. There, every other line begins with a sequential letter of the Hebrew alphabet. Another is found in Psalm 119, written in 22 stanzas of 8 lines. All lines in a given stanza begin with the same letter. Too bad the English translation does not reflect the Hebrew alphabetical sequence.

In modern times, the alphabet is often found in word games for children and is sometimes called the ABC Poem.
Psalm in Action by Judi Van Gorder

All praise our Creator, called by many names,
Blessed is the work of His hands.
Cant in dulcet tones His psalms,
Dance with energy in His presence
Eager to follow His lead 
For faith is an action word.
Gather the oppressed, offer support,
Hold them close in His name.
Include all who ask, honor those who don’t.
Joyfully serve all of His commands.
Kindle a flame in your heart to
Light the way for others that they may see,
Mantled by His virtue, we endure.
No one is less in His sight
Offer sustenance and acceptance to all.
Protect with fervor His creation.

Quiet is His manner, 
Righteousness His strength,
Science His invention,
Time His plan. 
Unconditional is His love, 
Vast His ability to forgive,
Wise His teachings and
Xenias, His gifts given in abundance. 
Yes, is my answer to His call, my
Zeal, will be tempered by tolerance in His image.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1064
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

My example
There was an Old Lady

An old lady, I first thought
But then I looked again
Certainly she’s maybe not
Defined as old my friend.

Especially in times of later born –
Fine times in which we live.
Granted, that she does seem worn
Having always had to give.

I know she was a helpmate first,
Joining with her man each day,
Keeping order when the worst
Lean times came their way.

Mostly she performed
Necessary tasks
Often, when informed –
Probably unasked.

Quietly she made a life,
Raising children, teaching.
Steadily, her husband’s wife
Taking without over-reaching.

Usual days would end in prayer,
Verses would be read you bet.
Wondrous things we not yet there;
X-rays weren’t invented yet.

Yes, she pre-dated bodice rippers,
Zones for buses, even zippers.

Note:  This is not an ABCDarilus Poetry form, for it lacks the spiritual or historic reference.
It is properly filed under ABC Poem.

Briolette

• The Briolette was invented in the 1950s by Viola Berg.

The Briolette is:
○ stanzaic, can be composed in any number of cinquains made up of a triplet and a rhyming couplet.
○ metric, iambic tetrameter.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme aaabb cccdd etc.

 Briolette of India by Judi Van Gorder

The Maharajah claimed it cursed
the diamond cut to quench a thirst.
King Richard, Lion Hearted, erst 
would take the gem on his crusade,
a brilliance which will never fade.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Shifting Gears (Briolette)

When age starts creeping up on you,
and physical restraints accrue
I wouldn’t quit if I were you
because at that time you will find
untapped resources in your mind.

The mountain trails you used to climb
are now denied – it seems a crime,
but render them to me in rhyme
that’s something which you didn’t do
while you were scrambling for the view.

Without much money in your purse
and your arthritis getting worse
a shared experience penned in verse
extends your life beyond your days
to generations in the haze.

©Lawrencealot – September 2, 2014

Visual template

Briolette

The Tennyson

The Tennyson is a stanzaic form patterned after Ask Me No More by English poet,Alfred Lord Tennyson (1802-1892).

The Tennyson is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of cinquains.
○ metric, iambic, L1-L4 are pentameter and L5 is dimeter.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme abbaC deedC fggfC etc.
○ written in with L5 as a refrain repeated from stanza to stanza.

Ask Me No More by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Ask me no more: the moon may draw the sea;
The cloud may stoop from heaven and take the shape,
With fold to fold, of mountain or of cape;
But O too fond, when have I answer’d thee?
————–Ask me no more.
Ask me no more: what answer should I give?
I love not hollow cheek or faded eye:
Yet, O my friend, I will not have thee die!
Ask me no more, lest I should bid thee live;
————–Ask me no more.

Ask me no more: thy fate and mine are seal’d:
I strove against the stream and all in vain:
Let the great river take me to the main:
No more, dear love, for at a touch I yield;
————–Ask me no more.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful PMO resource.

My Example Poem

Wastrel ( The Tennyson)

I wasted time throughout my early years.
and emphasized my chase for corporate gold.
I knew of course, that everyone grows old
unless an early death brings loved-ones tears.
I wasted time.

I wasted time while children’s magic bloomed,
and took for granted miracles in play.
I let too many moments slip away.
I failed to nurture love that was presumed.
I wasted time.

I wasted time just letting days go by.
But now I savor simple daily things-
a child that laughs, a parakeet that sings-
and cannot help but often wonder why
I wasted time.
© Lawrencealot – July 29, 2014

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The Tennyson