Symetrelle

The Symetrelle is a form created by Julie Moeller Writing on Allpoetry com as Bluejewel.

She describes it thus:

It begins and ends with a single subject line that is 7 syllables.   
It has ‘a hat and boots’, mono-rhymed couplets 
that lead you into and out of the subject with a 9 syllable count.  

At the heart of it is a mono-rhymed 4 line quatrain with an 11 syllable count.

 

Here is one of her poems:

Serenity

I don’t have to be perfect

From tragedy, it became my goal

Trying to untangle guilt from soul

 

It is exhausting to keep toeing that line

Always giving more, at everything outshine

Perhaps time expectations to realign 

Embracing forgiveness of self is divine

 

The sun rests too, as part of its role

Soothing peace after a day of toll

 

I don’t have to be perfect.

My Attempt

Inviation to Meditate (Symetrelle)

Invitation to Meditate

The many shades of tranquil

Invite a moment’s meditation,
a time for stress to take vacation

Set aside just briefly all that so compels,
the tasks upon which your mind so often dwells,
absorb solace from the sight, the sounds, the smells;
thrive in noting all the tension this dispels.

When cleared of complex cogitation
your mind provides imagination:

the many shades of tranquil.

© Lawrencealot – November 24, 2015

The Author’s template

 

Symetrelle

Rhyming Wave

The Rhyming Wave is a poetry form created by Katharine L. Sparrow, American writer and poet who writes on Allpoetry.com.

The Rhyming Wave is:

Stanzaic: Consisting of 2 or more quatrains plus an ending couplet.

Metric: Lines 1 through 3 are Iambic tetrameter and
line 4 is iambic trimeter.

Refrained: Syllables 6 & 7 of line one are repeated as syllables 2 thru 7
and syllable 8 is the same in both lines and syllables 1 & 2 are of line 3 are repeated in line 4
Refrain: The ending couplet is the first and the last line of the previous stanzas.

NOTE: The author is amenable to having poets substitute rhyming as well as identical syllables.  I have done so in my example poem.

Rhymed: Rhyme scheme Aaab BBbc CCd AD, where the capital letters represent refrain words or refrain lines.

Here is the author’s own explanation. At the end I have included a visual template that may help some.

The Rhyming Wave is a form of my own invention. The instructions seem complicated, but once you start writing it, you will get it pretty quickly.
A Rhyming Wave is so named because words repeat themselves, similar to waves lapping over and over again on the shore.
A Rhyming Wave has at least 2 verses and an ending couplet. Each verse is four lines with the first three written in iambic tetrameter (4 “feet” of 2 syllables each) and the fourth line three feet, or six syllables. The ending couplet will be the first and last lines of the poem repeated.
To write a Rhyming Wave you must know how to write in iambic meter. This is the da-DUM, da-DUM rhythm. If you don’t know how to do this, your Rhyming Wave may not come out sounding as it should. As with all iambic metered poems, it does not have to be PERFECT, but it should sound melodious to the ear.
– First line: 4 iambic feet (8 syllables)
She dwells among the foamy swells,
– Second line : syllables 6 and 7 of line one are repeated as syllables 2 through 7 (three times) and syllable 8 is also repeated as syllable 8.
the foamy, foamy, foamy swells–
– Third line: 4 iambic feet (8 syllables) last syllable rhymes with last syllable of lines one and two
Beneath the cresting waves she dwells,
– Fourth line: first 2 to 3 syllables (whichever fits) of line three are repeated/ six syllables only
beneath the ocean’s roll.
 
Verses 2 through 4, same pattern – first line of each verse rhymes with last line of previous verse:
Her song floats from a sandy shoal
a sandy, sandy, sandy shoal–
her voice that creeps into the soul,
her voice, a crooning trill.
And over all a misty chill
a misty, misty, misty chill–
she’ll sing again, it’s sure she will,
she’ll sing her haunting tune.
 
Her humming soothes the silver moon,
the silver, silver, silver moon,
where stars will span the ocean soon–
where stars will hear her song.
 
Ending couplet, first and last lines of the poem:
 
She dwells among the foamy swells,
where stars will hear her song.
 
* poem must have at least 2 verses, but there is no limit to the number of verses
 
ENTIRE POEM/ a Rhyming Wave:

Mermaid’s Song
 
She dwells among the foamy swells,
the foamy, foamy, foamy swells–
beneath the cresting waves she dwells,
beneath the ocean’s roll.
 
Her song floats from a sandy shoal
a sandy, sandy, sandy shoal–
her voice that creeps into the soul,
her voice, a crooning trill.
 
And over all a misty chill
a misty, misty, misty chill–
she’ll sing again, it’s sure she will,
she’ll sing her haunting tune.
 
Her humming soothes the silver moon,
the silver, silver, silver moon,
where stars will span the ocean soon–
where stars will hear her song.
 
She dwells among the foamy swells
where stars will hear her song.

Example #2/ a Rhyming Wave

Rose Covered

A cottage in the shady wood,
the shady, shady, shady wood–
amid soft, leafy arms it stood
amid the woodland trees.
 
Perfume hung on the hazy breeze
the hazy, hazy, hazy breeze
where roses opened for the bees
where roses blossomed red.
 
The roses climbed and gently spread,
and gently, gently, gently spread–
they made the walls a flower bed,
they made the cottage sweet.
 
A respite in the steamy heat,
the steamy, steamy, steamy heat–
a cool and comfortable retreat
a cool and quiet place.
 
A cottage in the shady wood,
a cool and quiet place.

 

My example:

Pleasant Quest

He waited for the perfect mate
the perfect, perfect, perfect mate
the one he would appreciate
the one he knew he’d find.

She’d have to have a caring mind
a daring, rare and caring mind
to make him leave his quest behind
to make him say, “It’s you!’

Enroute he took a playful view–
a playful, playful, playful view
before he chose to say, “I do”–
before he chose his bride.

He had a very pleasing ride–
a pleasing, teasing, pleasing ride
He mostly left girls satisfied.
He most enjoyed the search.

He waited for the perfect mate
He most enjoyed the search.

© Lawrencealot – August 27, 2015

Visual Template

Rhyming Wave

Raay or Rai

Thai poetry.

The Raay or Rai is a forerunner of the Kloang and has the same unique tonal pattern. It is a chained verse, written with the end syllable of L1 rhymed with the beginning syllable of L2. It was often used to record laws and chronicle events in verse.

The Raay is
○ stanzaic, written in a series of couplets.
○ syllabic, 5 syllables per line.
○ chain rhymed, the last syllable of L1 rhymes with the first syllable of L2.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1035#chann
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Ponderables  (Raay)

Although I’ve known strife,
life has been a wide-
eyed ride where each thought
brought more great questions.

© Lawrencealot – January 29, 2015

Visual template

Raay

Spenserian Quintilla

The Spenserian Quintilla is an American stanzaic form which was first recognized by Miller Williams in Patterns of Poetry when he notes a Spenserian variation framing The Second Best Bed by Howard Nemerov, he called it the Spenserian Quintilla.

The Spenserian Quintilla is:
• stanzaic, written in any number of cinquains.
• syllabic, L1-L4 are 8 syllables each, L5 is 12 syllables.
• rhymed, axabb cxcdd etc x being unrhymed. 

The Second-Best Bed by Howard Nemerov

Consider now that Troy has burned
—Priam is dead, and Hector dead,
And great Aeneas long since turned
Away seaward with his gods
To find, found or founder, against frightful odds.

And figure to yourselves the clown
Who comes with educated word
To illustrate in mask and gown
King Priam’s most illustrious son
And figure forth his figure with many another one

Of that most cremented time
In times have been or are to be
Inhearsed in military rime;
And will recite of royal fates
Until, infamonized among those potentates

By a messenger from nearer home,
His comedy is compromised
And he must leave both Greece and Rome
Abuilding but not half begun,
To play the honest Troyan to a girl far gone.

The wench lived on, if the son died—
All Denmark wounded in one bed
Cried vengeance on the lusty bride,
Who could not care that there would follow,
After the words of Mercury, songs of Apollo.
———— from The Collected Poems of Howard Nemerov 1977

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2061
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

2nd Thoughts

2nd Thoughts (Spenserian Quintilla)

Thoughts conjured up within my brain
I sometimes think are mine alone
but how on earth does one explain
insights (which I admit are rare)
appearing suddenly (it seems) and from nowhere?

The brain’s impulses it is known
are electrical fields at work,
that’s something that’s been clearly shown.
The magnetism thus invoked
extends to common pools, which maybe I evoked.

© Lawrencealot – January 25, 2015

Visual template

Spenserian Quintilla

Payar

Bengali Poetry is from the Bengali Region, Eastern India and dates back to the 10th century . Its origins were in mystic poetry but later became known for its epics. 

The Payār is the most common form from the Bengali Region.
The Payar is:
• stanzaic, written in any number of couplets.
• rhymed. aa bb cc etc.
• syllabic, 14 syllables lines which are normally broken into 4 units.

4 4 * 4 2
4 4 * 4 2
or
xxxx, xxxx, xxxx, xa
xxxx, xxxx, xxxx, xa

Temptation by Judi Van Gorder
Words in color, writ in anger, meant to provoke, to prod,
rude distraction, wrong direction, lead me away from God.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1218
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Non Pro Se (Form: Payar)

A pacifist may turn his cheek, ignoring simple threats,
but can’t forsake community to which all men owe debts.

Extend your hand, with open palm to other men — of peace,
but gird your loins, unsheath your sword, to make evil surcease.

© Lawrencealot – January 5, 2015

Visual template

Payar

Patrol Poem

The Patrol Poem “is an accentual verse poem in three stanzas of four lines each.” Rex Allen Brewer invented the form in response to an exercise in group study of Poet’s Companion. It was an exercise to create a new form, distinct by meter, rhyme and use of poetic devices. I include it here because the form is musical and representative of one of many small poetic communities popping up on the internet. 

The Patrol Poem is:
• a 12 line poem made up of 3 quatrains.
• accentual verse, giving importance to stress count. There are 4 stresses in each of the 4 lines of the first quatrain, 3 stresses in each of the 4 lines of the second quatrain and the stress count alternates stresses from 4, 3, 4, 3 in the third quatrain.
• rhymed, rhyme scheme is xaxa xbxb xcxc. x being unrhymed.
• composed with repetition of words as a criteria of this form. In each quatrain 1 word is repeated 4 times, anaphora (repetition of the first word of the line) may be employed to accomplish this goal. 

Advice to a Beginning Poet-Writer 
by Rex Allen Brewer 

Listen to your broken heart my friend; 
listen as the old folks speak; 
listen to the jay’s tall tale; 
listen and learn before you speak. 

Write the simple stuff; 
write the common tale; 
write barefoot poetry; 
write to shape a spell. 

Learn to write with Glory words, 
words that soar and fight. 
You want words that sing and shout, 
words that dance all night.

With Apologies
by Judi Van Gorder

Late, again and again and again!
Late for school, the bell has rung,
late for work, a client waits,
late for mass, the Kyrie sung.

I’m always a step behind,
time seems to slip away,
I find too much to do. . .
delay, delay, delay.

I am even late in dreams,
I rush to be on time,
I vow to change, be punctual,
forever an uphill climb.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1921
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Can You Do This (Patrol Poem)

Cut out responding when provoked
Cut out concern that you’ve been dissed.
You cut your nose to spite your face
when cutting comments make you pissed.

Let words of rudeness wither,
let them simply dissipate.
Let a smile touch on your face,
let them see no sign of hate.

When taunters see you’re not affected
when mean words they choose to spew,
when tranquility’s reflected,
that’s when they’ll stop taunting you.

© Lawrencealot – January 5, 2015

Silva de consonantes

Spanish poetry.

Silva de consonantes, the defining features are:
○ stanzaic, any number of couplets.
○ syllabic, alternating 7-11 syllabic lines. 7-11 7-11 7-11 7-11 7-11 etc.
○ rhymed, consonant-full rhyme aabbccdd etc.

Mr. Jones by Judi Van Gorder

The office door stood ajar,
invitation for our cheerful morning star.
He liked to talk. Everyday
he stopped to chat before going on his way.
I suppose he was lonely,
at 92, wife gone, kids grown, absentee.
Welshman, from across the sea,
he tried to teach me Welsh, often sang to me.
Its been a while since he last
stopped by. I miss his smile and song, his life passed.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1026#consonantes
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Maybe is but a Deferral (Form: Silva de consonantes)

“Maybe” really means “Aw shit!”
It’s a dirty word, and that’s the truth of it.
It is merely an excuse
given in advance; I think it’s child-abuse.
Yet a phrase that’s just as bad
is when mother blandly says, “Go ask your Dad.”
They have taught me not to lie.
Knowing saying simply “No!” may make me cry,
parents oft choose to postpone
answers, or pretend perhaps they’re not their own.
Better though than another
once referred is: “Okay, go ask your mother.”

© Lawrencealot – December 19, 2014

Visual template

Silva de consonantes

Manardina

Manardina: 12 lines. Invented by Nel Modglin
Rhymed syllabic form: 4a-8x-8b-8b-8x-4x–4x-8b-8b-8x-4a-4a
Two rhymes. X=no rhyme.

International Women’s Day 2011

Women unite!
International Women’s Day.
One hundred years to celebrate!
Globally all people can state
the female gender really shines.
Equality
non-violence
let all women participate.
We need a just world-wide mandate
so every girl can freely choose
what she thinks right
with future bright.

Pasted from:
http://www.rainbowcommunications.org/velvet/forms/Manardina.pdf
My Thanks to Linda Varsell Smith for her contributions above.

Specifications restated:
Single stanza 12 line poem
Syllabic 4/8/8/8/8/4/4/8/8/8/4/4
Rhymed: axbbxxxbbxaa

My example

Do All Deceive? ( Form: Manardina)

Well if I could
tell truth from fiction I’d be smug
I guess, or upset every day
by knowing folks from what they say.
The aspirations of a man
and how he acts
reveal his soul.
Sometimes a man will bow and pray
while deeming other men his prey.
The truth if known, is oft ignored
and does no good,
although it should.

© Lawrencealot – December 19, 2014

Visual template

Manardina

Cyclus

• Cyclus is shape poem found in Pathways for a Poet, it attempts to create a cycling pattern by syllable count. It is attributed to Marvin Davis Winsett.

The Cyclus is:
○ a 12 line poem.
○ syllabic, syllables per line 2-4-6-6-4-2-2-4-6-6-4-2
○ unrhymed.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1001#cyclus
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Recalibrate Tomorrow (Cyclus)

Each day
begins anew
despite our baggage load.
Burdens accumulate –
seem thrust on us;
some are,
but most
we allow by
trying to please others.
Tomorrow pick only
what is fun to
carry.

© Lawrencealot – November 24, 2014

Curtal Long Hymnal Stanza

Curtal Long Hymnal Stanza

Type: Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Stanzaic
Description: A stanzaic form composed of three lines of iambic tetrameter and one of iambic dimeter rhymed abab.
Schematic:
xX xX xX xA
xX xX xX xB
xX xX xX xA
xX xB
Rhythm/Stanza Length: 4

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/000/63.shtml
My Thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for the wonderful PoetryBase resource.

Note: The ONLY difference between this and the Curtal Quatrain is the rhyme scheme.

My Example Poem

My All [Corrected] (Curtal Long Hymal Stanza)

My friends will not critique my verse
they think that they are being kind.
my enemies are even worse
and I don’t mind.

Those folks would shout and jump with glee
and guffaw loudly when I goof
but they ignore me so can’t see
my error’s proof.

I wrote this form with half the count
of syllables required last week.
for feet took double that amount
so thus this tweak.

© Lawrencealot – May 10, 2014

Visual Template

Curtal Long Hymnal Stanza