Wounded Couplet poetry form

This is a form invented by Lisa Morris , aka Streambed on Allpoetry.

This form contains within its rhyming pattern, two couplets, one of which seems wounded, and is wrapped by four other lines, hence some rationale for its name.

It is stanzaic, consisting of any number of octains.
It is syllabic 10/10/6/10/10/10/10/10
It is metric, using iambic meter.

It is rhymed, the pattern being: abccbadd

Example Poem

 

Elixir     (Wounded Couplet)

My lover went a wandering I think
for he believes that magic will restore
his potency and verve.
He wants to play around is all.  What nerve!
He claims he’s seeking mermaids by the shore
to find for him an elixir to drink.
Which beats testosterone in every way
whenever fortitude comes into play.

 

The tavern called the “Wharf” is near the beach
and frequently young barmaids catch his eye
(which seldom scans the shore.)
Perhaps it’s just the scanty clothes they wore
I guess he’ll look for fairies by and by.
The man’s intent let’s try not to impeach.
If elixir’s at home in foaming glass
he’ll need a test, and’s sure to make a pass.

 

I figured then that two could play that game
so put on fairy costume with a mask
and strode into the bar.
The men’s reactions  bordered on bizarre.
I had five drinks and didn’t have to ask,
But all their pick-up lines were truly lame.
When sitting, my costume revealed my thighs,
which seemed to be a magnet for the guys.

 

My lover was among the gazing flock,
He leered at me with barely hidden lust.
His fairy had appeared.
The absence of a potion was not feared,
as his eyes roamed from ankles up to bust.
His codpiece was enlarged, and not with socks.
The elixir was visual nothing more.
Adventure comes to men when they explore.

 

I saw some girls were equally entranced
with fairy wings and panty showing skirt,
and thus I tweaked my plan
and this is how my fairy tale began.
I planned and schemed and still had time to flirt
and with each wink I found my plan enhanced.
With stealth each girl departed then came back
prepared to mount our fairy tale attack.

 

Each girl returned in fairy tale attire
and each in turn gave their farewell that night
then walked out to the sea.
We danced and splashed and shared a fine esprit
and spoke of fairy kings and mortal’s plight
and all the fantasy the men require.
My lover saw his fairies on the beach
but all of us were well beyond his reach.

 

When I got home light hues announced the dawn;
my drunken lover was unconscious yet.
He needed all his sleep.
As planned, his dreams were bothersome and deep.
He woke and pulled me close and said, “Annette,
It frightened me when last night you were gone.
It gave me pause and gave me cause to grieve.
I’ll not again go chasing make believe.”

© Lawrencealot – April 14, 2014

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Deibhidhe

Deibhidhe
The deibhidhe is an Irish form. In English it is more often spelt deibide, but you still have to pronounce it jayvee. (The Irish language uses a lot of unlikely-looking clusters of consonants, and most of them seem to be either pronounced as “v” or not pronounced at all. Exercise: pronounce the name of the poet Medbh McGuckian.) 
Here’s a deibhidhe about the time I spent working in the oil industry: 

No, Watercolour…

Of a subject dire I sing:
Reservoir Engineering
I could never understand –
A queer and quaggy quicksand!

I was sent away to learn
About it in climes northern,
But while at Herriot-Watt
My zeal did not run riot.

All the years I worked in oil,
My conscience was in turmoil.
I floundered through the fog
Like a bogged-down wan warthog.

My colleagues would make a fuss.
Those strata – were they porous?
It bothered me not a whit
How the drill bit grey granite.

The mysteries of the rock
Made me feel like a pillock.
Underground movements of gas
Alas, my mind can’t compass.

I don’t work there any more,
Redundancy my saviour.
Not a tragedy at all –
A small but welcome windfall!

There was a TV advert for an airline some years ago which featured the following exchange between two passengers on a flight to Aberdeen. Large outgoing American: “D’you work in oil?” Weedy-looking bespectacled Brit: “No, watercolour.” Hence the title. Herriot-Watt University is situated near Edinburgh and offers week-long courses on such arcane subjects as Reservoir Engineering, cleverly sugaring the pill by making them coincide with the Edinburgh Festival.
As for the form, each stanza has 4 lines of 7 syllables each, rhyming aabb, and both of these rhymes are deibide rhymes i.e. in the first line of each rhyming pair, the rhyming syllable is stressed, and in the second it is unstressed.
The form also demands an aicill rhyme between lines 3 and 4 i.e. the word at the end of line 3 rhymes with a word somewhere in the middle of line 4 (as whit/bit, gas/alas above). 
Finally, there must be alliteration between the last word of each stanza and the preceding stressed word (as quaggy quicksand, welcome windfall above).

This amounts to a lot of constraints for the fourth line to satisfy in the space of only 7 syllables. I found this form a tough one, except when writing the last stanza. Perhaps I was getting into the swing of it by then.
Thanks to Bob Newman for his wonderful Volecentral resource site.

Specifications restated:
Isosyllabic: 7/7/7/7

Rhymed: aabb
My example poem

Night Nymph     (Deibhidhe)
I was mesmerized, entranced
when she stood in the entrance.
Just one glance at her’d confer
instantly a pure pleasure
The nymph caused my heart to sing
and set my nerves to dancing
I viewed her in near undress
and dreamed she’d be my mistress.
But it was not meant to be,
this maiden oh so pretty.
for she was gone with the sun
a nighttime visit vision.
© Lawrencealot – April 10, 2014
art by Herbert James Draper [d. 1920]
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Violette

• The Violette is a stanzaic form with a rhyme scheme similar to the Zéjel without the mundanza, introduced by Viola Gardner. Line 4 carries a linking rhyme from stanza to stanza.

The Violette is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
○ syllabic, 6/6/6/4 syllables per line.
○ rhymed, feminine rhyme used aaab cccb dddb etc b is a linking rhyme from stanza to stanza.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1882#baccresiez

My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO

My example poem

Fairy Trails     (Violette)

I followed her that day
to where the fairies play,
I thought ‘twould be okay.
She ran from me.

I touched her; thought I’d earned
that for which I’d so yearned
but with that touch I turned
into a tree.

As seasons’ colors changed
with words and thoughts exchanged
the fairy maid arranged
to set me free.

With nothing more to lose,
each year she brings me clues
and monthly she will choose
to sit with me.

© Lawrencealot – April 7, 2014

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Trochadiddle

This form started as a nonce form written by
Michael Fantina, aka Eusebius of Alllpoetry for his poem
“Magics”

Michael is much too busy writing beautiful and entertaining poetry to be bothered with the practice of giving names to forms which he writes on the fly, often consciously or subconsciously influenced by Algernon Swinburne, from whom he thinks he might have borrowed this pattern.  Definitely he was influenced to occasionally merge two un-stressed syllables, or to add an occasional syllable deviating from a strict syllabic or accentual pattern where his creativity and mind’s ears says that it works.

Neither was Swinburne the only great to invoke this technique.  In fact is it is hard to find truly creative and expressive poets where this technique has not sometime found deployment.

I have been just learning to conform to form and pattern, and like anyone just learning, have always felt safer abiding strictly to the defined pattern of a form.

I define and name each new form that I see (and/or like in any manner at all) so that we may speak of it by name and all be speaking of the same animal when we give it a try.
My specifications:
This is a stanzaic poem, consisting of one or more sestets.
It is syllabic, each stanza being 10/10/6/5 syllables.
Rhymes: aabcbc, where the b-rhymes are feminine.
Metered subject to the following pattern:
DUM da da DUM da da DUM da da DUM
DUM da da DUM da da DUM da da DUM
da DUM da da DUM da
da DUM da da DUM
da DUM da da DUM da
da DUM da da DUM

Note: if  you write this same form beginning each of the long lines with a Spondee as did Gary Kent Spain, writing as venicebard on Allpoetry, you will have written a Spondiddle.
Original poem Magics by Eusebius

Gather the stars and the moon for a spell,
With holly and sard and an umber conch shell.
And sing to the sound of
A bell left unrung.
With a pestle ground love
Till your song is re-sung.

Call on a harlot who’s pale as the moon,
Call on her nightly, but call on her soon.
And while she is weeping,
Take one crystal tear,
And when she is sleeping
One jewel from her ear.

Gather them there near your hearth at the dawn,
Drench them with dew from the grass on the lawn,
And while it is brewing
Like some frothing sea,
You’ll soon then be wooing,
But me, only me!

© February 2014

You will see that the above poem, and the one illustrated by the visual template below, stray 0ccasionally from the specified pattern.
That is what I refer to a creative diddling around, and led me to the name of this form.

This represents a step forward in my poetic growth, as my rigidity is lessened for I realize now that poets always have this license, but can never take a knock for exercising it in competition with this form.
My example poem:
Sweet Apparition     (Trochadiddle)
Watched as the moon and the clouds seem to pose
with stars bunched so closely the Milky Way glows,
with night now becoming
invitingly cool
I heard something coming
up out of the pool.

She’s an apparition it seems at first glance
formed with perfection and sure to entrance.
Her eyes are green emeralds
but tinted with blue
her voice sweetly heralds
sweet pleasure, I knew.

“Love me tonight while we’re here all alone,
I cannot stay for this form is on loan.”
I did I’m believing,
I slaked both our thirst
and she’s not now grieving-
relieved of her curse.

© Lawrencealot – February 26, 2014

I call this a Trochadiddle
Long lines begin with a trochee and end with an iamb.
You will note that in line 2, I added an unstressed
Syllable before beginning the pattern – and also added an extra unstressed syllable mid-line,
 as I did elsewhere.  This is the diddling!
So the stressed syllables become
STARS, CLOSE, MILK, GLOWS, as though “with” were on line1.
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Pentibrach

It is so named because of the unique metric foot proposed by its creator Glenn Meisenheimer, known on Allpoetry as gmcookie.

He proposed a five syllable metric foot with only the center syllable being accented.  Because of its resemblance to an amphibrach with an unaccented syllable affixed to each end, I named this the pentibrach.   If scholars find a precedent we will of course bow to an established usage.

The poem is stanzaic, consisting of at least two quatrains.
It is syllabic: 10/9/10/7
It uses external rhyme, rhyming the last line of each stanza. (xxxa)
I realize there are alternative options to provide a metric schema, but I shall use the authors own presentation, and define here the metric feet to be used:

The pentibrach:             da da DUM da da
The secundus paeon:    da DUM da da
The iamb:                        da DUM

Each stanza is formed thus:
L1 & L3      two pentibrach feet
L2               a pentibrach followed by a secundus paeon
L4               a pentibrach followed by an iamb

The author’s original poem.

Kandahar

As the shadows fall and the daylight fades
And the owl flirts with the whippoorwill,
In that twilight time when the nightingale
Sings his love songs to the stars,

You will find me here in the umbral dark
As I wend through trees and monuments,
In the gloaming dusk when the sunlight fades
And when Jupiter joins Mars.
It is only then, from this cursed ground,
There is strength in my soliloquy,
As I raise my voice on the evening breeze
And I sing my ghost-thin bars.

It’s an ancient tune yet a timely one
Of a sailor washed ashore near here
Who was buried deep in this Christian soil
Far away from Kandahar.

My Attempt at one:

Entranced     (Pentibrach)

As she stretched her arms to the morning’s dim
and her curvature delighted me
 I assumed that I’m just a blessed guy
who was honored here by chance.

The is nothing that would predict that I
should be met on earth by goddesses
or be catered to by the likes of her.
Don’t disturb me from this trance.

© Lawrencealot – February 15, 2014
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LaJemme

The LaJemme is a 5 stanza form created by poets Laura Lamarca and Jem Farmer.
Syllalbic:          10/10/10/10  8/8/8/6 8/8/8/6  10/10/10/10  10/10/10/10
End Rhyme Pattern:  abab cdfe gfdf hihi abab
Cross-rhyme required and interleaved rhyme required.
Expanded rhyme pattern:
 a(ab)(ba)(ab)(dc)(cd)(fe)(ef)g(gf)(fd)(df)h(hi)(ih)(hi)a(ab)(ba)(ab)
Where the first letter in parentheses is syllable 4, the second is end rhyme.
Meter: consistently iambic
As stated by the inventors:
Stanza 1, 10 syllables per line, Rhyme scheme abab, 4th syllable of each line is to rhyme with the end rhyme of the preceding line.
Stanza 2, syllable count: 8/8/8/6, Rhyme scheme cdef, with cross rhymes in each couplet on 4th syllable
Stanza 3, syllable count 8/8/8/6, Rhyme scheme gfdf, 4th syllable of each line follows the same rule as stanza 1.
Stanza 4, 10 syllables per line, Rhyme scheme hihi, 4th syllable of each line is to rhyme with the end rhyme of the preceding line.
Stanza 5, 10 syllables per line, Rhyme scheme abab, 4th syllable of each line is to rhyme with the end rhyme of the preceding line.
Note: I would have been much happier if the poet had required cross-rhyme in both short line stanzas, for sake of elegance and consistency.
Example poem.
Celeste     (LaJemme)
She comes some nights from mists beyond the sea
and sings to me the songs of sirens lore.
Notes float ashore in tones of upper C
that guarantee a mortal won’t ignore.

I’m driven then to leave my wife
and leave my life behind again
and simply go as lemmings do.
This much is true, you know.

The amber glow within her eyes
would not surprise a wizard though
they do bestow control that men
succumb to when they glow.

She uses me to quench her mortal thirst
and from the first I’ve risen to her game.
I cannot tame the fires for she’s well versed
and has rehearsed her wiles to much acclaim.

Her origin remains a mystery
It’s plain to see she’s easy to adore
and wanting more, to me comes naturally
I heed her plea and dance to her sweet score.

© Lawrencealot – December 19, 2014
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Forward/Backwards Poetry

Simply poetry that reads as a coherent verse from top to bottom or when read from bottom to top.

See also:  Trick Poetry.

Example poem:

The Search / The Capture

Well  okay dammit I give up.
You’re smarter than a Cheshire cat,
more stubborn than a Pit Bull pup,
there’s no escaping all of that.

You talk to beasts within the bog
the beasts choose to leave you alone
perhaps because Rambo’s your dog,
and your own dog weighs eighteen stone.

No hiding from the two of you
you have such access in the bog;
it seems all life there takes the view
they’re friends with you and Rambo dog.

It’s not your job to poke around
where police have already failed,
where not a trace was ever found,
no one has been detained or jailed.

Since that’s the case I shall relent.
The bog’s your turf, now that I know,
Enjoy the hunt that’s your intent
You’re granted my okay to go.

The Capture

(c) Lawrencealot – April 19, 2013

Simply for your reading out-loud convenience
I have printed it switched below.

The Capture

You’re granted my okay to go.
Enjoy the hunt;  that’s your intent
The bog’s your turf, now that i know,
Since that’s the case I shall relent.

No one has been detained or jailed.
where not a trace was ever found,
where police have already failed,
It’s not your job to poke around .

They’re friends with you and Rambo dog
it seems all life there takes the view
you have such access in the bog;
No hiding from the two of you.

And your own dog weighs eighteen stone
Perhaps because Rambo’s your dog,
the beasts choose to leave you alone;
You talk to beasts within the bog

There’s no escaping all of that;
more stubborn than a Pit Bull pup,
You’re smarter than a Cheshire cat,
Well  okay dammit,  I give up.

The Search

Dizain

Summary: Two accepted forms:
Eight lines:    Rhyming  ababcdcd
or Ten Lines:  Rhyming ababbccdcd
METER:  Not required; Classic meter customary.
A French form popular in the 15th and 16th centuries, it is a single
stanza of 8 or 10 lines (10 being more common), with 8 or 10 syllables
in each line (each line being of the same length). A classic meter is
normally used, e.g. iambic pentameter.
The rhyme scheme is ababcdcd, or ababbccdcd.
Below is an 8 stanza iambic tetrameter example.
Example Poem
Nighttime Magic
Nighttime Magic
Dark dandy finely cloaked does walk
with daunting cold disdain for some
at night presuming he can shock
and render still those thieves so dumb
as to try force against this man.
His staff benevolent, it’s said,
in daytime will foil nighttime plan
against him; leaving fools quite dead.

© Lawrencealot – April 2, 2012

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Atrina

The ATRINA form was Invented by Keith Metcalf Drew of AllPoetry.A stanzaic poem of 18 lines, consisting of 3 quatrains and a sestet.

It is isosyllabic, each line have 8 syllables.
Rhymed: AaaA BbbB CccC AaBbCc where the capital letters indicate refrain lines.
(AaaABbbBCccCAaBbCc)
The first and last lines in each verse are exactly the same.
The third line in each verse is of similar wording to the second line or reversed i however prefer it if you use the same words but reversed.
Then when you have written the three verses.
The fourth verse consists of the first two lines from each of the three verses.
Here is an example:
AN ATRINA:

Her heart it pales in shades of grey,
The pain inside to ever stay,
Inside the pain to ever stay,
Her heart it pales in shades of grey,

Reciting all the poems she’d read,
The lover lost within her bed,
Lost the lover within her bed,
Reciting all the poems she’d read,

And deep within she still believes,
The angels keep her heart its grief,
The grief her heart the angels keep,
And deep within she still believes,

Her heart it pales in shades of grey,
The pain inside to ever stay,
Reciting all the poems she’d read,
The lover lost within her bed,
And deep within she still believes.
The angels keep her heart its grief.
 Example Poem

From the Mist    (Atrina)

A love like yours is heaven’s gift.
It saved a soul that was adrift.
A soul was saved that was adrift.
A love like yours is heaven’s gift.

You came to me out of the mist.
Your lips demanding to be kissed.
Your lips expecting to be kissed.
You came to me out of the mist.

I left mere mortals on the shore
to be with you forever more.
with you I’ll be forever more.
I left mere mortals on the shore.

A love like yours is heaven’s gift.
It saved a soul that was adrift.
You came to me out of the mist.
Your lips demanding to be kissed.
I left mere mortals on the shore
to be with you forever more.

© Lawrencealot – March 10, 2013

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Decquain

The Decuain (pronounced duck•won), created by Shelley A. Cephas, aka Shelly A on Allpoetry.
It is a short poem made up of 10 lines, which can be written on any subject.
There are 10 syllables per line and the poem is written in iambic pentameter.
There are 3 set choices of rhyme scheme:
ababbcbcaa, ababbcbcbb, or ababbcbccc
For a longer Decuain poem, add more stanzas for a double, triple, quatruple, etc. Decuain.

Example Poem

Leap to Lancelot 
















They thought they had me trapped– the silly fools.
But I’m an acrobat and dive with skill.
I do double twists into tiny pools.
I’ll foil their evil plans to rape and kill.
After a safe dive, which will be a thrill,
I’ ll be saved by Sir Lancelot by skiff.
He’s promised so I know he surely will.
His little boat was hidden by the cliff.
No maiden fair (and that does describe me,)
will Lancelot allow be lost at sea.
(c) Lawrencealot – April 18,2012
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