Choriambic dactylic fusion

This is a complex accentual-syllabic form invented by Glenn Meisenheimer writing on Allpoetry.com as gmcookie.

The Choriambic dactylic fusion is:
Stanzaic, consisting of any number of quatrains.
Each stanza is rhymed: (a/a)x(b/b)x, where x is unrhymed, and the letters
within parentheses indicate internal rhyme with the end word.
Each stanza is metered:
L1 and L1 are choriambic dimeter. A choriamb is a trochee followed by an iamb, thus DUM da da DUM.
L2 is catelectic dactylic tetrameter, thus [DUM da da] [DUM da da] [DUM da da] [DUM da ^]
* catalectic:  (kăt′l-ĕk′tĭk) adj.  adj. Lacking one or more syllables especially in the final foot.
L4 is catelectic dactylic trimeter, thus [DUM da da] [DUM da da] [DUM ^ ^]

This should all be made clear by the visual template below.

Here is the inventor’s first poem using this form:

Goblins

Pounding away day after day,
Prying the gold from the heart of the mountain,
Digging the ore, searching for more,
That’s what the goblins all do.

When it gets dark time to embark,
Crawling from holes to the moon lighted surface,
Patter of feet, hunting for meat,
Deep in the darkening woods.

Man child is best, troublesome pest,
Juicy and tender when stewed or when roasted,
Rabbits are nice, deer will suffice,
Partridge or grouses will too.

Then they are gone just before dawn
Scurrying back to their home in the darkness,
Digging the ore, searching for more,
That’s what the goblins all do.

Pasted from <http://allpoetry.com/poem/11855944-Goblins-by-gmcookie>

My example

Gallivanting (Form: Choriambic dactylic fusion)

Riding the rails, sleeping in jails
youth was misspent if consensus is taken.
Sleeping in tents, riding the fence
these were the acts that he loved.

Going on hikes, riding on bikes
Travel was far more important than where to.
Seeing how life coped with it’s strife,
building himself on the fly.

Seas that he’d sail hunting for whale
toughened him up and exposed him to drinking,
planning to chase ladies in lace,
gambling with dice and with cards.

Hunting for gold, campsites were cold
metals he learned to decipher by looking.
Scattered around, wonders were found
When and wherever he went.

Filled up with life, finding a wife
knowing the place where he started was dandy,
he raised some kids, yep, that he did
here at the end of the line.

© Lawrencealot – January 15, 2015

Visual template

Choriambic dactylic fusion

Cyhydedd Naw Ban

Cyhydedd Naw Ban, cuh-hée-dedd naw ban, is the 17th codified ancient Welsh Meter, an Awdl merter. Poems using this meter often have lengthy sequences of couplets without change of rhyme. 

The Cyhydedd Naw Ban is:
• written in any number of rhymed couplets.
• made up of 9 syllable lines.
• rhymed, aa etc.
x x x x x x x x A
x x x x x x x x A
Wrthyt greawdyr byt bid vygobeith
Wrthyf byd drugar hywar hyweith
Yth arge neud gwae nyt gwael y gweith
Wrth dynyon gwylon y bo goleith
Wrht hynny Duw vry vrenhin pob ieith
yth archaf dagnef keinllef kanlleith.
Einion 15th century

News Images by Judi Van Gorder

They stand tall with bravado and yet,
covered faces deny who we’ve met.
Rockets, AKAs, swords, held in threat,
brow of hapless hostage exudes sweat.
No games played here, you will lose the bet,
mistakes of the past, lead to regret.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=971
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Dainty Dolly and Her Sister Anne (Cyhydedd Naw Ban)

Dainty Dolly and her sister Anne
have both been romancing the same man.
The gutsy guy’s known as Dapper Dan,
who plays the ladies because he can.
But when they saw him flirt with Dianne
The sisters imposed a Dan man ban.

© Lawrencealot – November 25, 2014

Verso-Rhyme

Verso-Rhyme is an invented verse form introduced by L. Ensley Hutton and written without punctuation except for an exclamation at the end. Therefore, I can only assume that the poem should be written on a subject the poet feels emphatically about. 

The Verso-Rhyme is:
○ an octastich, a poem in 8 lines.
○ syllabic, 6-4-6-4-6-4-6-4 syllables per line.
○ rhyme, xaxbxaxb. x being unrhymed.
○ usually right margined.

 

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1882#verso
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Mother Sez (Verso-Rhyme)

I’ve tried to teach you son,
to give a darn.
Your puppy chewed my shoes
that were non-skid.
This is a house and it
is not a barn.
Put down the toilet seat!
Don’t slam the lid!

© Lawrencealot – October 30, 2014

Visual template

Verso-Rhyme

Tuanortsa

Tuanortsa is a Palindromic poem. A palindrome reads the same from front to back as from back to front. Palindromes in a single word would be level, radar, eye, civic, rotor etc. 

A palindromic poem need not be quite as tricky as turning a word inside out. The lines can simply be mirrored so that the sequence reverses order and the lines read the same from bottom to top as they do from top to bottom. This was presented to me as a poetry exercise. Why it was called Tuanortsa, astronaut spelled backward, makes no sense to me because the word it isn’t a palindrome. Be that as it may, there was only one requirement of the exercise, write a ‘poem’ that makes sense when read, line by line, from bottom up as well as from top down. There should be no fewer than 6 lines but there may be more. Meter and rhyme are at the discretion of the poet.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1918
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

NOTE: The single reason that I classified this separately from the Palindrome is that it posits a minimum number of six lines.

Related forms: Palindrome, Trick Poetry

My example

Plan to Have Been (Tuanortsa)

Determine early your life’s goal
Since most of us may choose our role
Leave evidence that you were here.
Give offspring’s offspring cause to cheer.
Disdain the taking of the dole.
Give offspring’s offspring cause to cheer.
Leave evidence that you were here.
Since most of us may choose our role
determine early your life’s goal.

(c) Lawrencealot – October 29, 2014

Swinburne Cross-Rhyme Octave

This form is derived from the poem Rococo (and another I forget) by Algernon Charles Swinburne.

The form is: Stanzaic, consisting of Octaves
Syllabic, each quatrain consisting of 7/6/7/6 syllables
Metric: Iambic trimeter, with odd numbered lines being feminine rhymed.
Rhymed: ababcdcd or abababab.

My example

I Went Topless

I Went Topless

Then boldness was discovered, 
bikini’s came to be! 
More skin became uncovered 
by girls with spirits free. 
Our stream was well secluded 
and stood upon our farm, 
and thus the girls concluded 
we’d play there without harm. 

And younger than all others 
I had no breasts to hide 
But Jane had tits like mother’s 
and seemed most satisfied. 
While Sally looked most slender 
and tied her top on tight 
the buxom would engender 
in males a keen delight. 

We frolicked flaunting boldness 
where we were all alone, 
enjoyed the water’s coldness 
enjoyed what flesh was shown. 
I saw more than intended – 
that filled my mind with joy, 
for of all who attended 
I was the only boy. 

© Lawrencealot – May 3, 2014

Visual Template

Swinburne Cross-Rhyme Octave

Eleventh Power

• Eleventh Power is an invented stanzaic form introduced by Christina Jussaume who requests the subject be uplifting.
The is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of 11 line stanzas.
○ syllabic, 11 syllables each.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme abababccddd or ababababccc.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/2192-invented-forms-from-poetry-styles/
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Not to Waste (Eleventh Power)

Each day if a morning comes it seems a gift;
there’s more to do I have not yet done to date.
A poem to read to give my soul a lift
and poems to write before it is too late.
When younger, the days seemed not too short or swift,
but now I realize that time for no man waits.
There’s someone for whom for whom a cheerful smile
will brighten the day and make it more worthwhile.
A joke or a smile’s not wasted anywhere
and feeling alright’s a proper mood to share.
Today’s an extra! So live it like you care.

© Lawrencealot – October 11, 2014

Visual template

Eleventh Power

Sestenelle

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• Sestennelle is a stanzaic invented form introduced by Lyra LuVaile with a variable meter.

The Sestenelle is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of sixains made up of 2 tercets. The original is 3 sixains.
○ metric, iambic, L1&L4 a dimeter, L2&L5 are trimeter and L3&L6 are pentameter.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme aabccb ddeffe gghiih etc.
○ suggested that the lines be centered.

 

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

In Choosing Well (Sestenelle)

It has been said
a soul may search ahead
and choose themselves the parents who’ll conceive
their earthy form.
There must have been a swarm
of applicants if that’s what you believe.

If such is true
Amera’s baby knew
that boundless warmth and love and gratitude
would come his way
for each and every day
he shared with her; he knew with certitude.

It seem to me,
that through her he shall see
the wonders other children just might miss,
and through his eyes
(this can be no surprise)
his mom will view new realms of earthly bliss.

© Lawrencealot – September 27, 2014

Visual template

Sestenelle

Ripple Echo

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Ripple Echo is an invented stanzaic form that “begins and ends its stanzas with rhyming ripple and echo couplets”. I am not quite what that means but it sounds fun. What I am sure of is, L2 and L8 of each octave are anapestic mono meter rhyming with the previous line. This form was introduced by L. Ensley Hutton.

The Ripple Echo is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of octaves, made up of 4 rhymed couplets.
○ metric, L1,L3,L4,L5,L6,L7 are catalectic trochaic tetrameter, L2 & L8 are anapestic monometer.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme aabbccdd.
○ L2 & L8 are indented.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Self-actualization

Self-actualization (Ripple Echo)

You have made it to the top.
       Now don’t stop.
Much more magic lives in you
more remains for you to do.
You have won, not just by might.
Actually, you’ve done things right.
Standing tall, you’re now allowed
        to be proud.

© Lawrencealot – September 21, 2014

Picture Credit” Google Images, “Congratulations”

Visual template

Ripple Echo

Repete

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Repete is an invented form similar to the Rondel. It was introduced by Viola Berg. Although it is 14 lines it does not pretend to be a sonnet. 

The Repete is:
○ a quatorzain made up of an octave and a sestet.
○ metric, iambic tetrameter.
○ rhymed, turned on only 2 rhymes, rhyme scheme ABababAB ababAB
○ L1 becomes a refrain repeated L7 & L13 and L2 is a refrain repeated in L8 & L14.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Impulse Buyer (Repete)

I think my missteps all have come
when swept away in ecstasy.
When bored my actions aren’t so dumb;
I contemplate what costs might be
and calculate events to come.
I’m prey to hospitality.
I think my missteps all have come
when swept away in ecstasy.

It maiden beats a sensual drum
my common sense is history.
I’ve married oft enough, then some,
but age has calmed me down, you see.
I think my missteps all have come
when swept away in ecstasy.

© Lawrencealot -September 21, 2014

Visual template

 

Laurel

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

 

 

The Laurel is another invented verse form created by Viola Berg that switches meter and rhyme between stanzas.

The Laurel is:
a poem in 24 lines, made up of 4 sixains.
metric, L1, L3, L4, L5 are iambic tetrameter, L2 and L6 are iambic trimeter.
rhyme, abcccb adeeed fghhhg fijjji.
the trimeter lines are indented.
 

 

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol>

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

My example

 Scorn the Reaper (Laurel)

You won’t find me afraid of him —
the reaper with the scythe.
I never was before this day;
I haven’t lived my life that way,
and that’s the way it’s gonna stay
as I run out my life.

He’s pictured as a guy that’s grim
but that’s a fantasy.
A tale that’s told (to what avail),
with heaven added to your hell?
I’ll live my life, and live it well,
for what shall be shall be.

My organs all shall pass to dust
as someday will the stars.
Before my intermission comes
I’ll eat fresh fruit and dried-out plums
I’ll dance to music played by drums
banjos and steel guitars.

I’ll acquire lovers, friends, and trust
that measure suits me fine.
My body’s served me, so’s my mind.
The body part, I’ll leave behind,
I’m not sure what my mind might find
and claim at last as mine.

© Lawrencealot – September 14, 2014

Visual template

Laurel