Mathnawi

Mathnawi

Mathnawi or Masnavi is normally poetry written in rhyming couplets. It is believed it emerged from an Iranian form around the 4th – 10th century, and the name is Persian and is not Arabic as some claim. The subject is usually heroic, romantic, or religious. Some Persian Mathnawi are especially significant in Sufism, Rumi’s Mathnawi-i-Ma’nawi is an outstanding example.

Most Persian Mathnawi are normally eleven (11) syllables, occasionally ten (10). There is no limit to the number of couplets.

It has a rhyme scheme a. a.. b. b.. c. c. etc as shown in the following example:

Nature

Each and every plant that pushes forth new leaves

Is well aware of the life that it conceives

Richly blossoming forth its symbolic scenes

That helps to procreate and pass on its genes

So reliant on symbiosis for the key

It needs the help of creatures like worker bees

And all the other creatures that pass on seed

Those creatures fertilize each plant and weed

And as the seasons each year wax and wane

With time we see one year’s loss is another’s gain 

We discover that Nature balances out with time

Making certain that nothing can e’re out-climb 

All things are equal with Nature we must learn

And a balanced life must be our main concern.

Ryter Roethicle

Persian poetry also influenced other nations and whilst Turkish poetry also developed it was slightly later and influenced by Persian poetry and was popular in Turkey until the fall of the Ottoman Empire.

Early Urdu Mathnawi was at first religious in nature, but because of Persian influence included romance, and adventure and even secular stories.

Arabic Mathnawi (Also called Muzdawidj) has one major difference in that it is presented as a triplet; a. a. a. / b. b. b. / c. c. c.. pattern, rather than a couplet shown previously.

Gone

It went to my head what you said yesterday 

And again the thoughts burn yet become doubts play 

For whenever hearts are involved I must pray. 

How goes these whispers into the heavnelies 

To evoke imaginative displays, please 

Me as much as the cello with bow glories. 

Charms take me away as do the words we speak, 

When there are clouds in our eyes they tend to leak 

For far gone days and flung desires bespeak.

Kathy Anderson

 

Pasted from http://thepoetsgarret.com/2011Challenge/form9.html

 My thanks to Ryter Roethicle and Kathy Anderson of the poetsgarret.

My examples

 

Enough With the Snow (Mathnawi – Persian)

 

‘Twas frigid, icy, wet and damnably cold

and by now, I’ll bet you know, it’s getting old.

One dismal tidbit hidden in winter facts

is the rise in shovel sponsored heart-attacks.

 

© Lawrencealot – February 21, 2015

 

OK, Let it Snow (Mathnawi – Arabic)

 

I refuse to be among the number dead.

I’ll hire teenage boys to do the work instead

‘cus I’m a codger who’s leaned to use my head.

 

© Lawrencealot – February 21, 2015

Caccia

Caccia in Italian,Catch in English, is a hunting song of the 14th and 15th centuries. It originally included two parts for voices who hunt each other. The lyrics were normally accompanied by a musical instrument. 

The Caccia or Catch is:
• known to have been composed with random 11, 7 and 5 syllable lines.
• usually carries a refrain at the end of the stanza.
• composed favoring onomatopoeia, incomplete phrases and the exclamatory statement.
• lyrics framed by stanza and rhyme at the discretion of the poet.

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1156
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

#284 CACCIA
9-9-98

The only hunting I do
is follow the soul’s
twists through corridors of sorrow and laughter

The wild game is illusive
shyly mocking, chase
cantering, cleaving, crocheting and rocking.

Resting in sleep, rising in
gallop, girding, it
grips, rides my laughter, test my pain, leaps over

river-wide splits in the sea.
Peer down O soul! Peer!
Set me aside in a still water pool, clear

from the maples of autumn
hung from the boughs
glimpsed through surface of still lakes, silent waters.

I will be gone, I will be
the reds and the golds
are but leftovers of greens, greens feed the beasts

Ah, beasts I will leave alone.
They deserve peace more
then the bee buzz of my soul, quiet refrains.

Pasted from <http://janhaag.com/PODes267-299.html#caccia>

My example

Peaceful Prescription (Caccia)

Uncertain, and unconcerned I set upon
my undaunted daily walk.
Oh, the things I see.

Doves and blue jays and their friends converse with me,
they tweet and twitter, perhaps
just because of me.

How many years I thought I was too busy
to wander willfully. My
doctor says I should.

© Lawrencealot – February 10, 2015

Kolang

  • The Kloang is stanzaic verse usually of proverbs originating in Thailand. One source suggests the Kloang attempts to capture the rhythm of oar strokes on the water. A Thai landmark Phra Mondob (Scripture Hall) built in the 19th century is decorated with Thai Verse proverbs called Kloang Lokaniti engraved on the outer-walls . The form is considered poetry of the intellectual because of its complicated tonal and rhyme patterns. Along with the Raay, it is one of the oldest forms of Thai poetry. It was developed when the Thai language had only 3 tones, high, low and neutral, the language now has 5 tones. The tonal pattern of the Kloang creates a unique rhythm which is its defining feature and impossible to emulate in English.

    Thailand’s honored poet Sunthorn Phy’s (1786-1855) most exciting adventure poem “Nirat Suphan” was written in the Kloang form.

    The Kloang is:

    • syllabic. L1, L2, L3 are 7 syllables each, L4 is 9 syllables.
    • stanzaic, written with any number of quatrains.
    • composed with an interweaving or cross rhyme scheme. The end word of L1 rhymes with the 5th syllables of L2 and L3. The end word of L2 rhymes with the 5th syllable of L4. L3 and L4 end rhyme.
    • is most often a poem of nature.
    • tonal which is impossible in the English language.

      x x x x a x b
      x x x x b x a
      x x x x b x c
      x x x x a x x x c

      Arctic Love —Judi Van Gorder

      Gnarly feet trudge on the ice,
      eighty miles entice a pawn
      of nature, the price to mate,
      four year cycle drawn up to create

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1035#chann

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My Example

East Coast Storm (Kloang)

 In the east there’s snow and ice,
for some that’s not nice you know.
Driving now takes twice the time
and air traffic flow’s far from sublime.

 © Lawrencealot – January 27, 2015

 

Visual template

Kolang

Bryant

Viola Berg, in her book Pathways for the Poet 1977, includes invented forms patterned after some works of American poets.

The Bryant describes observations of nature as metaphor for the social and political world around us. This stanzaic form is patterned after To A Water Foul by American poet, William Cullen Bryant 1794- 1878.

The Bryant is:
• stanzaic, written in any # of quatrains
• metered, L1,L4 trimeter and L2,L3 are pentameter. Short lines are indented.
• rhymed, alternating rhymed quatrains, abab cdcd etc
• a pastoral metaphor

A Water Foul by William Cullen Bryant 
Whither, ‘midst falling dew,
While glow the heavens with the last steps of day,
Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue
Thy solitary way?
Vainly the fowler’s eye
Might mark thy distant flight to do thee wrong,
As, darkly painted on the crimson sky,
Thy figure floats along.

Seek’st thou the plashy brink
Of weedy lake, or marge of river wide,
Or where the rocking billows rise and sink
On the chafed ocean side?

There is a Power whose care
Teaches thy way along that pathless coast,–
The desert and illimitable air,–
Lone wandering, but not lost.

All day thy wings have fann’d
At that far height, the cold thin atmosphere:
Yet stoop not, weary, to the welcome land,
Though the dark night is near.

And soon that toil shall end,
Soon shalt thou find a summer home, and rest,
And scream among thy fellows; reeds shall bend
Soon o’er thy sheltered nest.

Thou’rt gone, the abyss of heaven
Hath swallowed up thy form; yet, on my heart
Deeply hath sunk the lesson thou hast given,
And shall not soon depart.

He, who, from zone to zone,
Guides through the boundless sky thy certain flight,
In the long way that I must tread alone,
Will lead my steps aright.

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=616>
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Entwined

Entwined (Bryant)

We followed where you went
oh mighty beast, across this open land.
Our spirits bound to yours and thus content.
In ways we understand.

Because you moved around
impermanence defined our tribe’s motif;
you were revered, your souls and ours were bound
in happiness and grief.

And though we felled your kind
fulfilling nearly all our various needs,
it was with respect only in our mind
for your intrepid breed.

© Lawrencealot – November 19, 2014

Visual template

 Bryant

Double Glose

Double Glose
Type: Structure, Repetitive Requirement, Other Requirement
Description: The double glose uses each line of the texte as a refrain, twice in the poem. One was done as a Stave where the line is both first and last of the glossing verse.
Origin: Spanish/Portuguese
Schematic: Varies

Pasted from <http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/000/92.shtml>
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

Since there are numerable differences in the interpretation of the proper formal requirement of the Glose, sub-forms have been invented which specifically mandate requirements which might or might not be chosen when writing a Glose.

The glose originated in Spain, where it is known as the glosa.

I am presenting here only one reference to the Glose itself, from a site which appears no longer active, (November 2014) but which presented the following fine overview.

WHAT IS A GLOSA POEM?
The Glosa was used by poets of the Spanish court and dates back to the late 14th and early 15th century. For some reason, it has not been particularly popular in English. A search of the Internet search will uncovered a meager number of brief references to the form. From the limited information it is learned that the traditional structure has two parts. The first part is called the texte or cabeza. It consists of the first few lines (usually four) or the first stanza (usually a quatrain) from a well-known poem or poet. It has become permissible to use lines from a less well-known poet, or even from ones own verse.
The second part is the glose or glosa proper. This is a “gloss on,” an expansion, interpretation or explanation of the texte. The formal rule describes the glosa as consisting of four ten-line stanzas, with the consecutive lines of the texte being used as the tenth line (called the glossing) of each stanza. Furthermore, lines six and nine must rhyme with the borrowed tenth. Internal features such as length of lines, meter and rhyme are at the discretion of the poet. Examples of this will be found in this chapbook collection.
As with most poetic forms, unless dictated by strict contest requirements, poets have taken the liberty to vary the format. In addition to the glosa’s traditional ten-line stanzas, one will find 4-, 5- and 8-liners. They will be found written in free verse, with meter, and with rhyme. In the shorter variations. You will find variations in which the first line of each stanza (taken from the original texte) repeated again as the last line – added as a refrain. When the first line is repeated as the refrain at the end of a poem the stanza form is referred to as an Envelope.
Another variation of a short glosa poem has to do with the location of the borrowed line. It can be the first line, the last line, or one inserted into the body of the stanza. Yet another variation is the use of the first four lines of a prose piece as the texte.
 
Pasted from <http://www.poetry-nut.com/glosa_poetry.htm>

Restated specification for the Double Glose
The first part is called the texte or cabeza. It consists of the first few lines (usually four) or the first stanza (usually a quatrain) from a well-known poem or poet. It has become permissible to use lines from a less well-known poet, or even from ones own verse. It is presented as an epigram beneath the title of your own poem
The following Glose or Glosa proper is
Stanzaic: consisting of as many stanzas, as there are lines in your texte,
each having a line length of the poets choosing
Metered: With a consistent meter of the poet’s choosing
Rhymed or not with a pattern of the poet’s choosing
Formulaic: Each line of the texte shall be both the first and list lines of succeeding stanzas.
Related forms listed here: Glose, Double Glose, Top Glose

Example Poem
Too sweet and too subtle for pen or for tongue
In phrases unwritten and measures unsung,
As deep and as strange as the sounds of the sea,
Is the song that my spirit is singing to me.
-from Song of the Spirit
by Ella Wheeler Wilcox (1850-1919)

Too sweet and too subtle for pen or for tongue,
my thoughts dance and flutter on gossamer wings.
Elusively trapped in the webs I have spun
feelings that from my soul’s core have been wrung
in poems conceived when my heart soars and sings.
Too sweet and too subtle for pen or for tongue.

In phrases unwritten and measures unsung,
I long to give birth to them, set them all free.
The source I must find from which they have sprung,
then gathers the jewels I will find there among,
hat I might expound them in my poetry.
In phrases unwritten and measures unsung.

As deep and as strange as the sounds of the sea,
where voices of whales transverse distance and time,
all coming together in sweet harmony,
a harvest of gold born of my own psyche
are verses all written in metrical rhyme.
As deep and as strange as the sounds of the sea.

Is the song that my spirit is singing to me
forever to be an elusive refrain
that haunts me and taunts me with sweet melody
while mem’ry deserts me,  ignores every plea?
I cannot quite grasp or its beauty retain:
Is the song that my spirit is singing to me.

© Patricia Curtis, 2011

Pasted from <http://poetscollective.org/blog/2014/11/song-of-the-spirit/>

Visual template for this Double Glose
This poet chose sestet stanzas in catalectic amphibrach tetrameter,
With each stanza’s rhyme scheme being AbaabA.

Double Glose

Top Glose

Top Glose
Type: Structure, Repetitive Requirement, Other Requirement
Description: A variant of the Glose where the repetition from the texte appears as the first line of the glossing verse.
Attributed to: “The Dread Poet Roberts”
Origin: American

Pasted from <http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/003/317.shtml>
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

Since there are numerable differences in the interpretation of the proper formal requirement of the Glose, sub-forms have been invented which specifically mandate requirements which might or might not be chosen when writing a Glose.

The glose originated in Spain, where it is known as the glosa.

I am presenting here only one reference to the Glose itself, from a site which appears no longer active, (November 2014) but which presented the following fine overview.

WHAT IS A GLOSA POEM?
The Glosa was used by poets of the Spanish court and dates back to the late 14th and early 15th century. For some reason, it has not been particularly popular in English. A search of the Internet search will uncovered a meager number of brief references to the form. From the limited information it is learned that the traditional structure has two parts. The first part is called the texte or cabeza. It consists of the first few lines (usually four) or the first stanza (usually a quatrain) from a well-known poem or poet. It has become permissible to use lines from a less well-known poet, or even from ones own verse.
The second part is the glose or glosa proper. This is a “gloss on,” an expansion, interpretation or explanation of the texte. The formal rule describes the glosa as consisting of four ten-line stanzas, with the consecutive lines of the texte being used as the tenth line (called the glossing) of each stanza. Furthermore, lines six and nine must rhyme with the borrowed tenth. Internal features such as length of lines, meter and rhyme are at the discretion of the poet. Examples of this will be found in this chapbook collection.
As with most poetic forms, unless dictated by strict contest requirements, poets have taken the liberty to vary the format. In addition to the glosa’s traditional ten-line stanzas, one will find 4-, 5- and 8-liners. They will be found written in free verse, with meter, and with rhyme. In the shorter variations. You will find variations in which the first line of each stanza (taken from the original texte) repeated again as the last line – added as a refrain. When the first line is repeated as the refrain at the end of a poem the stanza form is referred to as an Envelope.
Another variation of a short glosa poem has to do with the location of the borrowed line. It can be the first line, the last line, or one inserted into the body of the stanza. Yet another variation is the use of the first four lines of a prose piece as the texte.
 
Pasted from <http://www.poetry-nut.com/glosa_poetry.htm>

Restated specification for the Top Glose
The first part is called the texte or cabeza. It consists of the first few lines (usually four) or the first stanza (usually a quatrain) from a well-known poem or poet. It has become permissible to use lines from a less well-known poet, or even from ones own verse. It is presented as an epigram beneath the title of your own poem
The following Glose or Glosa proper is
Stanzaic: consisting of as many stanzas, as there are lines in your texte,
each having a line length of the poets choosing
Metered: With a consistent meter of the poet’s choosing
Rhymed or not with a pattern of the poet’s choosing
Formulaic: Each line of the texte shall be the first line of a stanza.

Related forms listed here: Glose, Double GloseTop Glose

 

My Example

Where I’m Most at Home (Top Glose)

After  the opening stanza of
“This Place that I Call Home”  by Mvincent
 
” I am a lover of tall mountain peaks
when softly draped with blankets of fresh snow;
of alpine lakes and gleaming waterfalls,
slow running streams that teem with rainbow trout—”
  
I am a lover of tall mountain peaks
and desert flowers nestled twixt the sage
which climbs the foothills ’til it’s all replaced
by pine and spruce and fir.  Much flora seeks
out places in pre-alpine meadow– a stage
where it’s a hit that is too soon displaced.
 
When softly draped with blankets of fresh snow
my backyard even seems a visual treat.
The mountains dress in heavy coats of white
The snow depth measured in the scores of feet.
The hearty play and ski to their delight.
The mountains save  that pack so life can grow.
 
Of alpine lakes and gleaming waterfalls
I dream as my begin my climb today.
When half-way there I stop and watch below
as a coyote slowly wends his way
thru grasses tall, across the green meadow.
I stay ’til he’s gone, then I’ll find the falls.
 
Slow running streams that teem with rainbow trout
is far below me now and I’m at peace
and touching heavens breath.  Soon I’ll decide
to leave and fish for dinner.  I’ll not cease
to wonder at the calm enjoyed beside
slow running streams that teem with rainbow trout.
 
 © Lawrencealot – February 27, 2013

Visual Template
This template was created for iambic pentameter stanzas.

Gloss

Jorio

Welcome to the home of the jorio, a verse form I created. It’s a very simple concept, which I’ll explain.
A jorio is 4 lines, with each line 4 words. As I’ve described it before: poetic cubism…
The idea behind the jorio, is that I’ve always had the feeling that people felt that poetry was long and complicated. I wanted to show that it did not necessarily needed to be so. A jorio is (usually) not that difficult to read. It is more often about the image it evokes, than a deeper meaning or symbolism. Though you can always find something…
Joria (plural of jorio) are moments in time, feeling, image. A fleeting instant captured into words.

Pasted from https://www.fictionpress.com/u/505545/Niels-Stegeman

My example

Tears Bring Smiles

A scene of tears.
That scene’s a lie.
Man helping nature
Brings smiles to faces.

(c) Lawrencealot – October 17, 2014

Hybridanelle

What is a Hybridanelle?

First I shall give you my restated specifications, then present the original instructions by the inventor, Erin Thomas, aka Zahhar on Allpoetry.

The Hybridanell is:
A poem of 38 lines,
A combination of the Villanell and the Terzanelle,
Stanzaic, Consisting of 10 tercet stanzas, followed by 2 quatrains
Rhymed with one of two patterns: where subscripted capitals indicate refrained lines. Rhyme may be of any type, true, false, associative, assonance, consonance, etc..
Type A pattern:
 A1bA2 C1D1C2 abA1 cE1D1 abA2 eF1E1 abA1 fG1F1 abA2 gH1G1 abA1A2 hC1H1C2
Type B pattern:
A1B1A2 C1dC2 bE1B1 cdC1 eF1E1 cdC2  fG1F1 cdC1 gH1G1 cdC2 hA1H1A2 cdC1C2
Line length: at poet’s discretion
Meter: at poet’s discretion
=================================================

The hybridanelle (hi ‘brid an ,nell) is a 38 line poetic form that is a combination of the Italian villanelle and Lewis Turco’s terzanelle. It is created by interlacing the villanelle and terzanelle stanzaic structures together, kind of like shuffling cards, where the stanzas of each form are the individual cards. This means the villanelle and terzanelle refrains and end-line schemes leapfrog one another in the hybridanelle.

Instead of the end-line rhyme used by the villanelle and terzanelle forms, the hybridanelle’s end-line scheme may use other types of parallelism, phonemic or associative. As such, in the hybridanelle, the end-line scheme is exactly that, an “end-linescheme”, not a “rhyme scheme”. I have posted an article, “Some Alternatives to Rhyme”, that discusses and exemplifies many phonological alternatives to rhyme. I intend for the hybridanelle to be very approachable as an English poetic form rather than being yet another hand-me-down from another language that does not share the linguistic characteristics of English. Rhyme is one of the most limiting strictures imposed upon English poetry from languages such as Latin, Greek, and French.

There are two varieties of hybridanelle, Type A and Type B. The Type A hybridanelle begins with the villanelle’s opening tercet and ends with the terzanelle’s closing quatrain; the Type B hybridanelle, the inverse of the Type A, begins with the terzanelle’s opening tercet and ends with the villanelle’s closing quatrain.

The most useful way I have found to clarify all the points of a poetic form is to enumerate them.

First there are three points general to both the Type A and B hybridanelles:
1. The hybridanelle is comprised of ten tercets and two closing quatrains, totaling twelve stanzas.
2. Lines may be of any length or meter within reason.
3. Hybridanelles may be written on any subject.
The remaining points are different depending on whether you’re writing a Type A or a Type B hybridanelle.

First, Type A:
A4.
The first line from the opening tercet is used again as the third line of the third and seventh tercets and the penultimate quatrain. The third line from the opening tercet is used again as the third line of the fifth and ninth tercets and as the fourth line of the penultimate quatrain.
A5.
The first line of the opening tercet begins the a end-line scheme, used by the first line of every odd numbered tercet along with the penultimate quatrain. The second line of the opening tercet begins the b end-line scheme, used by the second line of each odd numbered tercet along with the penultimate quatrain.
A6.
The first and third lines of the second tercet are used again as the second and fourth lines of the closing quatrain, and they use the C end-line scheme between them.
A7.
The even numbered tercets, starting with the fourth tercet, each refrains the second line form the preceding even numbered tercet as its third line. The first line of each of these tercets uses an end-line parallelism with its refrained line.
A8.
The third line of the closing quatrain refrains the second line of the last tercet and uses end-line parallelism between its first line and that refrain.
A shorthand notation can be used to clarify the above points. Like letters indicate the end-line scheme, and uppercase letters followed by a superscript numeric notation indicate the refrains: A1bA2, C1D1C2, abA1, cE1D1, abA2, eF1E1, abA1, fG1F1 abA2,gH1G1, abA1A2, hC1H1C2.

Now, for Type B:
B4.
The first and third lines of the opening tercet are used again as the second and fourth lines of the penultimate quatrain and use the A end-line scheme between them.
B5.
The odd numbered tercets, starting with the third tercet, each refrains the second line of the preceding odd numbered tercet as its third line. The first line of each of these tercets uses an end-line parallelism with its refrained line.
B6.
The third line of the penultimate quatrain refrains the second line from the ninth tercet and uses an end-line parallelism between its first line and that refrain.
B7.
The first line from the second tercet is used again as the third line of the fourth and eight tercets and the closing quatrain. The third line from the second tercet is used again as the third line of the sixth and tenth tercets and as the fourth line of the closing quatrain.
B8.
The first line of the second tercet begins a c end-line scheme, used by the first line of every even numbered tercet along with the closing quatrain. The second line of the second tercet begins a d end-line scheme, used by the second line of each even numbered tercet along with the closing quatrain.
The shorthand notation for the above points is as follows: A1B1A2, C1dC2, bE1B1,cdC1, eF1E1, cdC2, fG1F1 cdC1, gH1G1, cdC2, hA1H1A2, cdC1C2.

This information may be difficult to visualize without examples, so both the Type A and Type B hybridanelles are exemplified below with the shorthand notation for each type expanded out across the lines.

This first poem exemplifies the Type A hybridanelle:

Stormlight by Zahhar

formlesspoet/2008/04/stormlight.html

A1 Frantic flashes illustrate my view,
b   Random moments shot into the light;
A2 Thunder crushes every hope anew.
C1  I pass the night in a frail abandoned home,
D1 A weary vagrant teen deprived of will
C2 Awaiting the dawn within its quaking hold.
a   Visions strobe throughout the empty room,
b   Shadows briefly singed by every bolt;
A1 Frantic flashes illustrate my view.
d   I curl within my bag against the wall;
E1 There’s nothing left for the winds to rip from me,
D1 A weary vagrant teen deprived of will.
a   Etched amid the suffocating gloom,
b   Monster clouds roll black against the night;
A2 Thunder crushes every hope anew.
e   I’ve struggled to grasp what life could ever mean
F1 As memory and mind are stripped away;
E1 There’s nothing left for the winds to rip from me.
a   Leafless limbs are drawn in sepia hues;
b   Stark against the darkness of my thought,
A1 Frantic flashes illustrate my view.
f   I watch and listen, numb and half-aware,
G1 My slumber but vivid streaks of fitful dream,
F1 As memory and mind are stripped away.
a   Anxious waiting constantly resumes;
b   Shocked repeatedly from fugue to doubt,
A2 Thunder crushes every hope anew.
g   I try to manage what rest I can redeem,
H1 Protected from the storm by shifting frames,
G1 My slumber but vivid streaks of fitful dream.
a  Desolation roars the whole night through;
b  Forces seem to tear the world apart;
A1 Frantic flashes illustrate my view;
A2 Thunder crushes every hope anew.
h  Uncertain shadows pose in countless forms;
C1 I pass the night in a frail abandoned home,
H1 Protected from the storm by shifting frames,
C2 Awaiting the dawn within its quaking hold.

In this poem the end-line parallelisms used for the a and b schemes are assonance and consonance, respectively. The end-line parallelisms used for the remaining end-line schemes alternate between reverse rhyme (some of which is partial reverse rhyme) and frame rhyme.

Although a fixed meter is not a requirement of this form, a consistent meter or set of meters contributes greatly to the way the hybridanelle flows. This is a form of poetry that is not very forgiving of clumsy phraseologies or word flow. In this poem, the villanelle “weave” uses catalectic trochaic pentameter while the terzanelle weave uses a combination of iambic pentameter and iambic-anapestic pentameter.

This next poem exemplifies the Type B hybridanelle
Inhumation by Zahhar

formlesspoet/2008/03/inhumation.html

A1 locked wards cower in the distant gloom;
B1 grated windows pattern all my dreams;
A2 heavy haze distorts my heavy mood.
C1 my eyes are weary of watching faded lights;
d   i wait throughout the dismal night to hear
C2 the call of a rooster just beyond my sight.
b   silence is an ever-present drone;
E1 tempered springs betray my slightest move;
B1 grated windows pattern all my dreams.
c   these cinderblocks enfold my spirit in lime;
d   interred in tomblike walls of concrete halls,
C1 my eyes are weary of watching faded lights.
e   thoughts amid this broken darkness brood;
F1 restless motions lurk within the shade;
E1 tempered springs betray my slightest move.
c   this is the crypt where my rotting soul is set,
d   thus laid to rest beyond that twilight hail,
C2 the call of a rooster just beyond my sight.
f   time is fractured into mental shards,
G1 strewn against the darkness of my view;
F1 restless motions lurk within the shade.
c   and the images betray my heart with lies
d  that flash against my mind as crumbled hopes;
C1 my eyes are weary of watching faded lights.
g   here i watch them phase in empty hues,
H1 omens of a future laid in brick
G1 strewn against the darkness of my view.
c   this lucid static is comfort of a sort
d   that’s lost with every sunrise when i hear
C2 the call of a rooster just beyond my sight.
h   black within the slowly rising brume,
A1 locked wards cower in the distant gloom,
H1 omens of a future laid in brick;
A2 heavy haze distorts my heavy mood.
c   i dread the sound that will end another night,
d   a sound that seals my fate within this hell—
C1 my eyes are weary of watching faded lights—
C2 the call of a rooster just beyond my sight.

In this poem the end-line parallelisms used for the c and d schemes, which is the villanelle weave, is a pattern of partial rhyme, reverse rhyme, and frame rhyme. The end-line parallelisms used for the remaining end-line schemes, which is the terzanelle weave, alternate between assonance and alliteration.

These two hybridanelle examples use phonological parallelism for their end-line schemes. For an example of a hybridanelle that uses associative parallelism for its end-line scheme, see the poem “Legacy”, which was written after this article was originally written. With associative parallelism, words relate to one another through meaning. In “Legacy”, the parallelisms are synonymic (alike in meaning) and metonymic (related through attributes).

What makes this form fascinating is the way elaborate end-line schemes can be used to create sound and word patterns—moods—that are unprecedented, or at very least uncommon, in English poetry.

Because the villanelle and terzanelle refrains weave through alternating stanzas in the hybridanelle, there is more distance between the refrains in the hybridanelle than in the villanelle or terzanelle. This makes it much easier to setup new contexts for the refrained lines, which can give those lines a fresh feel every time they are repeated—I have had some people read my hybridanelles without even realizing there were refraining lines—Yet the power of the refrains is not at all lost. If anything their power is intensified because they do not overwhelm the reader or audience.

Although the hybridanelle is inspired by the established villanelle and terzanelle forms, the fact that the hybridanelle uses an open end-line scheme, rather than the fixed end-line rhyme scheme used by its predecessors, makes it an entirely new form with an whole spectrum of new possibilities.

Pasted from <http://formlesspoet.blogspot.com/2012/04/what-is-hybridanelle.html>

My example
Don’t Wait 55 Years (Hybridanelle)

When I was young I climbed to mountain peaks.
It was a hike, a thing I’d do for fun;
to do it now would surely take me weeks.

The view from up above left me inspired
for on the top I stood above the clouds.
When young a man can climb and not get tired.

I’m older now; my body’s come undone
I lack the strength to scale the mountain face.
It was a hike, a thing I’d do for fun;

I thought I’d have the time when I retired,
I’d spend my time away from milling crowds.
The view from up above left me inspired.

But old man time has put me in my place.
A sedentary life extracts a cost;
I lack the strength to scale the mountain face.

The upward view itself should be admired,
it’s now the mountain tops the clouds enshroud.
When young a man can climb and not get tired.

Endurance, vim, and strength itself are lost;
This elder has to pace himself too slow;
A sedentary life extracts a cost.

With young teammates ascent could be acquired
that’s not my way, although it is avowed
the view from up above left me inspired.

I’ll see such scenes as those in video;
I should have climbed more often as a youth.
This elder has to pace himself too slow;

I did what at the time I most desired –
a truth I guess, that can’t be disavowed.
When young a man can climb and not get tired.

I’m happy now, but getting long of tooth.
When I was young I climbed to mountain peaks.
I should have climbed more often as a youth.
to do it now would surely take me weeks.

When age conspires to make a man bone-tired
he’ll have to leave some fertile fields unploughed.
The view from up above left me inspired.
When young a man can climb and not get tired.

© Lawrencealot – October 13, 2014

A visual template

Hybridanelle

Cinqku

The “cinqku” is a new Tanka analogue; a seventeen syllable cinquain that assimilates as much as possible from the Japanese haiku and Tanka traditions into the English poetic tradition.

Form Type: Syllabic
Origins: American
Creator: Denis M. Garrison
Number of Lines: 5
Rhyme Scheme: Not Applicable
Meter: Not applicable

Rules
1. A strict syllable count (2,3,4,6,2) making 17 syllables on 5 lines

2. No title

3. Tanka style free diction and syntax

4. No metrical requirement

5. A turn that may be similar to kireji or a cinquain turn.

Cinqku’s can be linked. A linked sequence may have a title.

Examples

buried
five cold years
but never gone – 
our bedroom’s fragrant with
her scent

Denis M. Garrison

Notes
A primary concern for the cinqku is the effective use of the line break.

Pasted from http://bensonofjohn.co.uk/poetry/formssearch.php?searchbox=Cinqku

My example

fires burn
far away
unseen ashes –
are felt and smelled upon
the wind

© Lawrencealot – October 7, 2014

American 767 poetry form

American 767
Created by Dennis L. Dean; rules: syllable count 7,6,7 and must have a bug in it.

Pasted from  http://the.a.b.c.of.poetry.styles.patthepoet.com/index.html

Many Thanks to Christina R Jussaume for her work on the Poetry Styles site.

 

 

Specifications restated:

The form is:
A poem of 3 lines
Syllabic: 7/6/7
Meter or Rhyme not required
Formulaic: Must mention some type of bug.

My example

What Bugs You? (American 767)

While a beetle is a bug
and thus can irritate,
it’s arachnids that I hate.

© Lawrencealot – October 4, 2014