Sevenelle

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• Sevenelle is a stanzaic invented form created by Virginia Noble which cannot only be found in “Pathways…” but is also in the Study and Writing of Poetry by Amy Jo Zook and Wauneta Hackleman, 1996.

The Sevenelle is:
○ stanzaic, written in no less than 2 septets, each made up of a rhymed couplet, tercet and couplet in that order.
○ metric, iambic tetrameter.
○ rhymed, aabbbCC ddeeeCC etc.
○ composed with L6&L7 of the first stanza repeated as refrain in the last 2 lines of all subsequent stanzas.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

California Smoke (Sevenelle)

I left the teeming crowds behind
with auto’s smoke so I could find
a healthy place to walk my dog
where one could if he cared to, jog
without the blight of all the smog.
Unhealthy ash from fires ablaze
corrupt Nevada’s autumn days.

But forests burning in the west
has messed my plans, you may have guessed.
My doctor says I must take care,
with particles now in the air
can’t take my puppy anywhere.
Unhealthy ash from fires ablaze
corrupt Nevada’s autumn days.

© Lawrencealot – September 27, 2014

Visual template

Sevenelle

Quintanelle

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Quintanelle challenges the poet to write a complete sentence and break it into 5 metric lines with rhyme. This stanzaic form was introduced by Lyra Lu Vaile.

The Quintanelle is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quintains.
○ metered, L1, L2, L5 pentameter, L3 dimeter and L4 trimeter. Each quintain should be one complete iambic sentence.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme aabbb, ccddd etc.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Winter Forage (Quintanelle)

I’ve left the apples where they’ve fallen, still; 
it’s natures harvest for the birds that will
not let them waste,
although there is no haste
for they’ll remain when fresh food is displaced.

© Lawrencealot – September 20, 2012

Visual template

Quintanelle

Frieze

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Frieze is a verse form that appears to be an exercise in feminine rhyme. Attributed to Olivia Freeman.

The Frieze is:
○ a poem in 9 lines.
○ metered, iambic trimeter.
○ composed with L2, L4, and L8 with feminine ending.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme abcbacabc.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Snowy Evening Stop  (Frieze)

I waited with my horse –
enjoyed the snowflakes falling;
he gave his bells a shake –
he wondered why the stalling.
The silent night’s sheer force
held every nerve awake,
and spirit too, of course.
Yet warmth of home was calling,
perhaps with chocolate cake.

© Lawrencealot – September 12, 2014

Visual Template

Frieze

Triversen

The Triversen, (triple verse sentence), is a sentence broken into three lines. It has also been referred to as a “verset”, a surge of language in one breath.

The Triversen was originated by William Carlos Williams as a “native American” poetic form of the 20th century. According to Lewis Turco in his Book of Forms, it is “one of the most innovative things done to modern free-verse.” It introduced the “variable foot” to free verse. As best as I can understand, the “variable foot” is a phrase or portion of a sentence contained within a line.

The Triversen is:
• accentual. The rhythm of normal speech, employing 1 to 4 strong stresses per line.
• stanzaic, written in any number of tercets. Each tercet is a sentence broken into 3 uneven lines, each an independant clause.
• grammatical. The sentence is broken by line phrasing or lineating or sense units. There should be 3 units. L1 is a statement of fact or observation, L2 and L3 should set the tone, imply a condition or associated idea, or carry a metaphor for the original statement.
• unrhymed.
• alliterated. Alliteration accentuates stress.

Eventide by Judi Van Gorder 8-20-05

Sunset silence is interrupted
by a cursory
“rib-it”.

Diminishing 
sun slides 
behind the horizon.

Twilight arrives 
with a hic-up 
and a wink.

 

On Gay Wallpaper by William Carlos Williams

The green-blue ground
is ruled with silver lines
to say the sun is shining.

And on this moral sea
of grass or dreams like flowers
or baskets of desires

Heaven knows what they are
between cerulean shapes”
laid regularly round.

Mat roses and tridentate
leaves of gold
threes, threes, and threes.

Three roses and three stems
the basket floating
standing in the horns of blue.

Repeated to the ceiling
to the windows
where the day

Blow in
the scalloped curtains to
the sound of rain

Copied from: http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=618

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

water lilies

Water Lilies (Triversen)

Water lilies on pond’s surface
lie in wait
just as though expecting us.

Posed on pads in proud profusion
as they might for Claude Monet;
only now, awaiting us.

Water lilies seem eternal
you and I
have just begun.

© Lawrencealot – August 27, 2014

Johnn

Johnn
Type: Structure, Metrical Requirement
Description: A form developed by Johnn Schroeder because we could find no structural forms beginning with the letter J. This is a three-verse syllabic form. Each verse is preceded by the title giving an element of repetition. The verses are five lines with the following syllable counts: 2, 3, 4, 3, 2; 4, 6, 8, 6, 4; 2, 3, 4, 3, 2.
Origin: American
Schematic:
Title

xx
xxx
xxxx
xxx
xx

Title

xxxx
xxxxxx
xxxxxxxx
xxxxxx
xxxx

Title

xx
xxx
xxxx
xxx
xx
Rhythm/Stanza Length: 5
Line/Poem Length:          18

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/001/156.shtml
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

 

Yep, the double n in Johnn is correct.

My example

A Dish to Die For

You don’t
want me on
your dinner plate
cute though I
may be

A Dish to Die For

I am the most
poison fish in the sea!
(Yet Japanese do relish me.)
Only expert can parse
safe parts of me.

A Dish to Die For

Many
dumb folks died
when they served me
merely fried.
Beware.

© Lawrencealot – August 21, 2014

Punnett

Invented by: Marc Arnts, marnts@yahoo.com

“I was very briefly at Allpoetry, but am mainly associated with writing.com. I invented this form for a contest where we were asked to devise a form based upon our occupation. As a former biology teacher, the Punnett sort of invented itself. The poems themselves should be centered on the page.”

(Punnett squares are used in Biology to assess the ratio of possible genotypic outcomes when crossing traits among a species.)

The Punnett – This form is based on the ratios in a Punnett Square.
The poem must be about a biological topic, with the first line being a
part of or offspring of the last line.
The form has nine lines, with a word count of 1/2/1/2/4/2/1/2/1.
There is no rhyming structure.

Leaf

Leaf
Trembling, rustling
Rest
Wind blown
Soaking up the sun
Building nourishment
Falling
From this
Tree

Cub

Cub
Playing, learning
Sleeping
Prairie hunter
Chasing after wild game
Agile sprinter
Stalking
Tall grass
Tiger

 

My Example poem.

Birdhouse Birthday Breakfast (Punnett)

Egg
sparrow laid
in
my birdhouse
hatches just in time
to become
a
meal for
Blue-jay!

© Lawrencealot – August 18, 2014

Oriental Octet

I found a few invented forms which appear to be exclusive to The Study and Writing of Poetry; American Women Poets Discuss Their Craft, 1983. The book is a collection of essays from 50 American women poets, each essay provides insights into a multitude of topics from poetic genres, stanzaic forms, to writing techniques. This book provided some addition insights and background information on several stanzaic forms that I thought I had researched fully. I liked this book, it pays attention to the details.

• The Oriental Octet is an invented verse form that appears to emulate the syllabic pattern of the tanka and haiku. It was created by James R. Gray who requests the theme of the poem be nature.

The Oriental Octet is:
○ an octastich, a poem in 8 lines.
○ syllabic, 5-7-5-7-7-5-7-5 syllables per line.
○ unrhymed.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2008#anna
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

My example poem
Seasonal Re-Paving (Oriental Octet)

In summer nature
re-paves our concrete sidewalks
with purple berry
colors spread by walking feet
or drops apples to kick.
In winter nature re-paves
with snow, in fall with leaves, but
leaves walks be in spring.

© Lawrencealot – August 17, 2014

Aeolic Ode

Aeolic Verse refers to meters commonly used in the lyrical works of Sappho and Alcaeus. Aeolis was the west and northwestern region of Asia Minor which included most of the Greek city-states and the Island of Lesbos in the 8th to 6th centuries BC, the Greek Dark Ages. Four classic meters are known from that culture, the Alcaic Stanza, the Sapphic Stanza, Glyconics (the basic form of Aeolics) and Hendecasyllabic Verse. The verse is quantitative, usually hendecasyllabic, employing 11 syllables and often includes an anceps, a quantitative metric foot that includes a syllable that could be interpreted either long or short. The meter helped set a tranquil or contemplative tone. Aeolic poetry.

• The Aeolic Ode is the earliest of the Odes, the product of an ancient Greek culture but I’ve found little descriptive information other than some quantitative scansion showing a similarity to the Adonic line of the Sapphic strophe. It is said to have a contemplative or tranquil tone.
• An asclepiad is one of the Aeolic meters attributed to Asclepiades of Samos. The aclepiad follows a particular metric pattern. It is built around the choriamb (metric pattern of LssL). The common example is a spondee followed by 2 choriambs and an iamb. LL LssL LssL sL, (L = long syllable, s = short syllable) the meter was used by Horace and others in Latin.

An example in English is: In Due Season by WH Auden

Springtime, Summer and Fall: days to behold a world
Antecedent to our knowing, where flowers think
Theirs concretely in scent-colors and beasts, the same
Age all over, pursue dumb horizontal lives.
On one level of conduct and so cannot be
Secretary to man’s plot to become divine.

Lodged in all is a set metronome: thus, in May
Bird-babes, still in the egg, click to each other “Hatch!”;
June-struck cuckoos go off pitch when obese July
Turns earth’s heating up; unknotting their poisoned ropes.
Vipers move into play; warmed by October’s nip,
Younger leaves to the old give the releasing draught.

Winter, though, has the right tense for a look indoors
At ourselves and with First Names to sit face to face,
Time for reading of thoughts, time for trying out
Of new meters and new recipes, proper time
To reflect on events noted in warmer months
Till, transmuted, they take part in a human tale.

There, responding to our cry for intelligence,
Nature’s mask is relaxed into a mobile grin,
Stones, old shoes, come alive, born sacramental signs,
Nod to us in the First Person of mysteries.
They know nothing about, bearing a mess from
The invisible sole Source of specific things.
COPYRIGHT 2007 Long Island University, C.W. Post College

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/1402-aeolic-odeaeolic-verse-asclepiad-meterglyconics/
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful PMO site. It is a wonderful resource.

Other Odes: Aeolic OdeAnacreontic Ode, Choral Ode or Pindaric Ode or Dorian Ode, Cowleyan Ode or Irregular Ode, Horatian OdeKeatsian or English Ode, RonsardianOde

Thematic Odes:

Elegy, Obsequy, Threnody Ode
Elemental Ode
Genethliacum Ode
Encomium or Coronation Ode
Epithalamion or Epithalamium and Protholathiumis
Palinode Ode
Panegyric or Paean
Triumphal Ode
Occasional Verse

Dear Readers,

The information taken from above and elsewhere leaves me in a state of confusion and despair. It seems that since the forms of that Greek and Latin era were both quantitative and irregular, and based upon long-short sounds that English (outside of music) does not do well, emphasizing instead stressed vs unstressed syllables – that I must take the bull by the horns and announce that since 21st century poets are
transformative (as all poets have been), I shall herein transform.

I have devised for my structure of the Aeolic Ode the following metric. It incorporates:
(1) Adonic line – a verse line with a dactyl followed by a spondee or trochee; supposedly used in laments by Adonis.
(2) Hendecasyllabic lines,
(3) A choriamb, to approximate an asclepiad.
(4) A foot that possesses an optional stress (approximating an anceps)
(5) The four metric feet include two, three, and four-toed metric feet. That alone is irregular.
(6) Rhyme is purely optional, in use and position.
(7) Stanza length and number is left to poets discretion.

First foot: A Dactyl
2nd foot: Either a spondee or a trochee|
3rd foot: A Choriamb (DUM da da DUM)
4th foot: An Iamb

Below is my example poem, and a visual template for my version of the Aeolic Ode for the 21st Century.

 

Ode to a Three-toed Sloth (Aeolic Ode)

Praise now the three-toed sloth who’s a folivore.
Hang he does, upside down, in a tranquil way
Eating the leaves and shoots and not needing more.
Cockroaches, moths and algae and ciliates,
beetles and fungi call his hair home sweet home.
He is a happy host for a range of life.

Eating what other cannot abide, he takes
Much time for every action for little food
value has leaves. Digestion requires a month.
Though he’ll descend each week just to take a leak
poop and then cover up the latrine he dug,
he’s most content up high. Do you wonder why?

Everything’s done upside down because of claws
made for that task, including a nap and sex.
Even some sloths who died have remained attached.
Half of the muscle mass that’s allotted to
beasts of their same size saves that hard- gleaned glucose
Therefore a sloth’s sloth screams “elegant” design.

© Lawrencealot – August 15, 2014

Visual template for this particular form.

Aeolic Ode

Deibhidhe Guilbnech Dialtach

Deibhidhe (jay-vée) and its variations are dán direach. These ancient Irish Verse Forms carry a deibhidhe or light rhyme. Meaning that each rhymed couplet rhymes a stressed end syllable with an unstressed end syllable. In English rhyme is usually between 2 stressed syllables (yellow/ mellow, time/ rhyme ) but Celtic verse often deliberately rhymes a stressed and unstressed syllable (distress / angriness, west / conquest), easier said than done. As with most ancient Irish forms the Deibhidhes are written with cywddydd (harmony of sound) and dunadh (ending the poem with the same word, phrase or line with which the poem began)Note: When writing in English it is sometimes very difficult to meet the stringent requirements of dan direach, so example poems are included that may not always demonstrate all of the features described.

• Deibhidhe Guilbnech Dialtach is:
○ written in any number of quatrains,
○ each line has 7 syllables.
○ rhymed, aabb.
○ alliterated, alliteration between two words in each line,
○ all end-words should consonate.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1173#guilbnech
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

A wonderful example I found:

A Deibhidhe* on Clocks Stuck at Midnight
by Gary Kent Spain

angel imp with withered wing
from chains delivered limping
then bossed, denied might and means
while men tossed you pied pipedreams

drab duality’s fall meant
full equality’s advent:
did distaste since harbored hide
hate’s misplaced ardor inside?

how clamped tight is your grasp, ghost
of the past: light the lamppost
change the spinner, hound out hell
bound by your inner angel

* (pronounced “jay-vee”)

Kent’s notes
Deibhidhe (pronounced “jay-vee”) is an ancient Irish measure consisting of 7-syllable lines rimed in couplets on the last syllable, stressed with unstressed. This poem has all the bells and whistles of Dan Direach (‘strict meter’): cross-rimes on every stress, alliteration in every line—preferably between last two stressed words (this last a requirement in the 3rd and 4th lines of each quatrain)—and the dunadh (first syllable, word, phrase, or line repeated in closing).

This poem (I think fairly obviously) addresses keeping up with the last half-century’s change in the general attitude towards race in America (on the part of those who were once victims of widespread discrimination and prejudice).

My example poem

Or, More Likely, Snow (Deibhidhe Guilbnech Dialtach)

Streamlets rushing from mountain’s source
become cascading creeks of course.
Creeks combine in the course of time
with mountain’s mandate being prime.

The brooks that babble then will merge
into a river’s rapid surge
and kissing, carve the mountain’s face
removing, rock which slowed its pace.

Great and ginormous rivers flow
to seas– there seized into escrow
where they await their great refrain
on mountain tops to fall as rain.

© Lawrencealot – August 7, 2014

Visual Template

Deibhidhe Guilbnech Dialtach

Breccbairdne

The Breccbairdne is oglachas, a casual imitation of dán díreach, an ancient, stanzaic Irish Form in which all end words are 2 syllables.

The defining features of the Breccbairdne are:
• written in any number of quatrains.
• syllabic, L1 is 5 syllables and L2,L3,L4 are 6 syllables each.
• rhymed xaxa xbxb etc x being unrhymed.
• all end-words are 2 syllables each.
• written with the defining features of most Celtic poems, cywddydd (harmony of sound) meaning alliteration, consonance and assonance and dunadh (ending the poem with the same word, phrase or line with which the poem began).

x x x (x x)
x x x x (x a)
x x x x (x x)
x x x x (x a)

Easy to Please by Judi Van Gorder

Faces of children
from different places
will wiggle with giggles
to make funny faces.

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1179>
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on the PMO resource.

My example poem

Roses (Breccbairdne)

Roses revealing
appeal to near noses
share scents from their flowers;
thorns safeguard the roses.

© Lawrencealot – August 4, 2014
Visual Template  (4 lines or multiple)

Breccbairdne