Depiction Prime

The Depiction Prime was created by Ashrus of Allpoetry.
It is:
A 6 line poem.
Stanzaic: having two three-line stanzas.
Syllabic: each stanza having lines of 4/6/5 syllables.
Formulaic: First stanza depicts the appearance of the subject of the poem, but never tells what the subject is. This stanza just describes its colour, look, beauty or style.
The First line of the next stanza may give a hint about the subject. Last two lines reveal the subject matter clearly. Lucid language is preferred in these three lines.
Rhyme pattern: xxa xxa. Last lines of both stanzas must rhyme.
Meter unspecified.

My example poem

Super Moon (Depiction Prime)

Tangerine arc
peeks over hill, becomes
crescent, then an orb.

Perigee time
make plains and craters seem
too grand to absorb.

© Lawrencealot – July 13, 2014

Visual Template

Depiction Prime

 

 

Ronsardian Ode

Ronsardian Ode
The Ronsardian ode (named after Pierre de Ronsard 1524-1585) is the only kind of ode that specifies a particular rhyming scheme – ababccddc, with syllable counts of 10, 4, 10, 4, 10, 10, 4, 4, 8. 
In the present rather windy economic climate, I thought an owed might be appropriate.
Owed to the Bank
I rue the day when I picked up the phone
(Connected then)
And asked them to advance me a small loan.
Never again!
The moment the transaction was arranged,
The pattern of my entire life was changed.
More than I’d guessed,
The interest
Mounts up. I must have been deranged.
Eleven thousand pounds I owe, they say.
That’s quite a debt.
I swear I’ll pay it back to them one day,
But not just yet.
Meanwhile I need a place to lay my head,
A jug of wine perhaps, a loaf of bread.
Then there’s my wife…
For normal life
Can’t stop because I’m in the red.
I’ve hardly slept since this nightmare began.
I lie awake,
Find fatal flaws in every single plan
I try to make –
But last night all my ideas seemed to gel.
I’ll find another job; all will be well.
A banking post
Will pay the most.
Why’s that? It’s not too hard to tell.
Ah, life as a teller. It’s a tempting thought. I think there should probably be a fourth stanza, but as yet there isn’t. Sorry.
I bought a book of Ronsard’s selected poems, and it didn’t include a single Ronsardian ode. So some further research may be called for.
Thanks to Bob Newman for his wonderful Volecentral resource site.
Cowleyan Ode or Irregular Ode, Horatian OdeKeatsian or English OdeRonsardian Ode
Thematic Odes:Elegy, Obsequy, Threnody Ode
Elemental Ode
Genethliacum Ode
Encomium or Coronation Ode
Epithalamion or Epithalamium and Protholathiumis
Palinode Ode
Panegyric or Paean
Triumphal Ode
Occasional Verse

My example poem
Ode to a Creek (Ronsarian Ode)

The little creek was built to irrigate
so men could farm.
Thus, daily men would rise to raise some gate
when days were warm.
Those summer days the creek would draw the boys
away from practiced games and silly toys
to share the breeze
with brush and trees
that lined the creek, contained their noise.

The larger boys had tied a swinging rope
on which we played
and dropped to take our daily bath sans soap,
quite unafraid.
When swing and drop became at last mundane
up to that branch we’d boldly climb again
into two feet
it seemed so neat,
we bore our scratches with disdain.
One fall they warned we could not swim nor fish
White poison flowed
and fish preceded it; to live their wish.
Death was bestowed
on parasites and all the mossy growth.
But all the neighbor boys I knew were loath
to think them right
when deadly white
killed life and our short season both.

When winter came a fragile sheet of ice
made young boys bold
for they could walk across it once or twice
when it was cold.
They’d taunt the older boys and wouldn’t care
how fast were bigger kids who’d chase them there.
The small ones knew
just what to do;
The bigs fell through most anywhere.

I cannot tell now where that creek had been;
growth needs, I guess.
New roads exist that hadn’t been there then,
such is progress.
That creek’s as gone as are my boyhood years.
but still the memories of it endears.
It served its roles
and other goals
before it bowed and disappeared.

© Lawrencealot – April 15, 2014

Visual Template

Whitney

WHITNEY
This titled syllabic form, created by Betty Ann Whitney, has exactly seven lines.
Syllable Pattern:  3/4/3/4/3/4/7
Example:
In the Garden Year
Voted best
Among the months
May and June
Sprout root and grow.
Soon will dance
On wiry stems
A blend of upturned blossoms.
Betty Ann Whitney, Wesley Chapel, FL
 
My Example Poem 

 
Introducing Summer   (Whitney)
Trampolines
and Bar-B-ques
and new mown
grass are mighty
fine, but still,
bikinis I
like best; hope I always will.
© Lawrencealot – April 15, 2014
 
 

Waltz Wave

WALTZ WAVE
This form, named for Leo Waltz, the Web Manager of Sol Magazine, asks for a one-stanza titled poem, with nineteen lines; each line has a set number of syllables.
Pattern:   1/2/1/2/3/2/1/2/3/4/3/2/1/2/3/2/1/2/1
Words may be split into syllables to fit the pattern.  This form seems to educe a soothing cadence as the lines gently increase and decrease, so it is suggested that topic chosen for this form also be soothing.
Today’s Gift (Waltz Wave)

White
blossoms
bloom
today
outside my
window
a
welcome
occurrence
since yesterday.
How many
mornings
have
I failed
to see the
gifts that
each
day brings
me?© Lawrencealot – April 15, 2014

Sweetbriar

  • The Sweetbriar is a stanzaic invented form similar to the Minuette. It uses only 1 rhyme and was created by Viola Berg.
    The Sweetbriar is:

    • stanzaic, written in 2 sixains.
    • syllabic, 4/4/6/4/4/6 syllables per line.
    • rhymed, rhyme scheme xxaxxa xxaxxa.
My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO

My example poem

He Watches Me Bathe    (Sweetbriar)

He likes to watch
me shower it excites
him, that I know.
I wait until I’m sure
he’s there, then I
put on my show.
I see him smile
as I’m caressed by the
cool water’s flow.
He spends that time with me
each day, until
I have to go.

© Lawrencealot – April 5, 2014
Visual Template

Octodil

  • The Octodil is an invented verse form that uses only even numbered syllable lines. It was created by Viola Berg.The Octodil is:
    • a poem in 8 lines, an octastich.
    • syllabic, 4/4/6/6/8/8/6/6 syllables per line.
    • unrhymed and no feminine or falling end words.
My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO

My Example poem

Who Says?   (Octodil)

An owl flew by
and looked into my eyes
and though I know I’d heard
him hooting in the dark of night
I’d never seen the fellow’s face.
I’ve understood that owl’s
are wise- it’s true; he did
not ask me “Who?”
© Lawrencealot – April 3, 2014

Awit

The Awit is a Filipino poetry form explained below by Judi Van Gorder
On her wonderful PMO resource site:

  • Awit literally means song. This stanzaic form seems very similar to the Tanaga. It is unique in that a stanza should be one complete, grammatically correct, sentence.The Awit is:
    • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains. (4 line multiples)
    • a narrative, it tells a story.
    • dodecasyllabic, 12 syllables per line, there is usually a pause after the 6th syllable.
    • rhymed, each stanza mono-rhymed aaaa bbbb cccc etc.
    • composed with each stanza representing a complete, grammatically correct, sentence.
    • composed liberally using various figures of speech.
    • written anonymously.
My example of a single stanza poem

The Climb     (Awit)

I started up the hills, intending on that day
to climb like deer to plateaus where the rocks gave way
to grasses lush and green, above where wild hawks play,
and ended up on top – above all human fray.
©  March 3, 2014

Rimas Dissolutas

This was originally a French form
 The form is isosyllabic  (all lines have the same number of syllables)
Meter optional
Line length optional
There is no stanza length requirement
There is no rhyming permitted within a stanza.
Each stanza must be like each other stanza
(same number of syllables, meter if any ,line length)
Line n in each stanza must rhyme with the same line in each other stanza. (External Rhyme)
Other sources:**************************************************
The Rimas Dissolutas is a French troubadouric verse (12th-13th centuries) in which unrhymed stanzas rhyme line by line with all of the other stanzas. This was a departure from the strict rhyme schemes of the day. The rhyme is there but it is more subtle.
The Rimas Dissolutas is:
  • stanzaic, written in any # of uniform length stanzas, all quatrains or all tercets or all sixains etc.
  • in keeping with most old French forms the verse is syllabic. One site suggests it is isosyllabic meaning all lines have the same number syllables, number of syllables at the discretion of the poet.
  • unrhymed lines within the stanza.
  • rhymed lines between stanzas.
  • sometimes written with an envoi which would be half the number of lines of the stanzas using the rhyme of the later lines of the stanzas.If the poem was written in sixains the rhyme would look like this:
Stanza 1
x x x x x a
x x x x x b
x x x x x c
x x x x x d
x x x x x e
Add’l Stanzas
x x x x x a
x x x x x b
x x x x x c
x x x x x d
x x x x x e
Envoi…
x x x x x c
x x x x x d
Thanks to Ms.  Van Gorder for the find PMO resorce.
Rimas Dissolutas (Troubadouric song)
I was delighted to discover recently that this was recognised – in some quarters, anyway – as a standard form, and had a name. In rimas dissolutas, the stanzas are all similar, and all use the same rhymes. The first lines all rhyme with each other, the second lines all rhyme with each other, and so on. These are all external rhymes; there are no rhymes between lines in the same stanza. 
The blessed Malcovati calls this form the troubadouric song, giving it as the only member of a category of open forms he calls coblas unissonantis (a Provençal term which he assures us is in common use). It is normal, he tells us, for there to be an envoi, shorter than the other stanzas but rhyming with the latter part of them.
Thanks to Bob Newman for the Wonderful Resource Site.
Example Poe
Groceries    (Rimas  Dissolutas)

 

We touch and kiss and hold and hug,
and work to earn our daily bread.
Our foodstuff’s ready in the store –
our meat our milk our wines our cake.
A small bird looking for a bug
about to be a meal instead
we breed to fatten, kill, and more
are we more proper than the snake?
© Lawrencealot – February 7, 2014

Picture credit: google images, rights belong to photographer.

Her is a visual template that just happened to choose
Iambic tetrameter quatrains.

Sheshire

Sheshire
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Isosyllabic, Pivot Requirement
Description:
A poem based on six-line verses with a closing couplet. Here are Chuck’s rules:
  1. The Sheshire is comprised of three stanzas of 6 lines with a rhyme scheme of either ABABAB or ABCABC. Completed by a rhymed couplet.
  2. Each line has the same number of syllables. The one exception to this is the last line, which may have up to six additional syllables. The additional syllables must a phrase that is set aside (by parenthesis or dashes, for example). If this aside is removed, the correct syllable count would be there and the line would remain a reasonable sentence.
  3. Each stanza should have a shift in tone. The ending couplet should leave the reader (or at least the poet) with a grin. It can be a darkly ironic grin, but a grin, nonetheless.
The derivation is from the Hebrew words shesh and shir or shira meaning six poem.
Attributed to:
Charles David Lipsig
Origin:
American (Jewish)
Schematic:
Rhyme: ababab or abcabc
Total schema:
ababab cdcdcd efefef gg or
abcabc defdef ghighi jj
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
6
Line/Poem Length:
20
Examples:
Status:
Incomplete
See Also:
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for the wonderful resource quoted. 
  • The Sheshire is an invented verse form by Jewish-American poet Charles David Lipsig found at Poetry BaseThe name comes from Hebrew six=shesh and poem=shir.The Sheshire is:
    • a poem of 20 lines made up of 3 sixains followed by a couplet.
    • isosyllabic except the last line which includes the same # of syllables as the previous lines plus a finishing phrase separated from the base line by caesura.
    • rhymed, rhyme scheme ababab cdcdcd efefef gg or abcabc defdef ghighi jj.
    • composed with a pivot or change of tone from stanza to stanza and ends with a note of irony.
 My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource quoted. 
 
 
Example Poem
Shovel Snow (Sheshire)

When I was only nine or ten
and winter’s chilly nights dumped snow,
I loved to help my daddy then
We’d bundle up, he’d say, “Let’s go!”
Together, we two working men
would scrape and push and scoop and throw.

Into my teens I found it paid
to take my shovel- make the rounds
to work for those who were dismayed
how quickly that white stuff abounds.
While others in their warm homes stayed
I worked with scraping, grunting sounds.

I had no sons to share the task.
Our drive was shaded by our house;
“Please clean the walk,” my wife would ask.
Of course one ought to please one’s spouse
so covered up, and with ski-mask
I worked. It did no good to grouse.

Retired and lazy now I nap
or read or watch my football game. (Let teens now do that crap!)

© Lawrencealot – February 2, 2014

Visual Template

Anaduo

This is an invented form created by Lisa La Grange of Allpoetry.com.
It is Stanzaic, composed of any number of sestets
It is Syllalbic 11/11/8/11/11/8
Meter: All lines are acephalous* anapestic
              The long lines are anapestic tetrameter
              The short lines are anapestic trimeter
Rhyme Scheme:  aabccb
*Acephalous = headless, lacking its first syllable
Example Poem:
Chased by a Cloud     (Anaduo)
Below the horizon, beneath where I stand
the streets of a city lie quilting the land.
It’s there that I work and I live.
I set out today, with no purposeful aim
My nose led my feet; up the mountain I came
for nature has beauty to give.
Just barely, below me the sounds I can hear
of traffic and people who don’t know I’m here.
I view what’s so rarely allowed.
I’ve climbed here before and I’ve stayed overnight
but never been treated to quite such a sight.
I’m proud to be chased by a cloud.
© Lawrencealot – January 30, 2014
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