The de la Mare

The de la Mare is a verse form patterned after Fare Well by English poet, Walter De La Mare (1873-1956). De La Mare is better known for his poem The Listeners.
The de la Mare is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of octaves made up of 2 quatrains.
○ metered, quatrains of 3 tetrameter lines followed by a dimeter line.
○ rhymed, xaxaxbxb xcxcxdxd etc. x being unrhymed.
○ composed with alternating feminine and masculine end words, only the masculine end words are rhymed.

Fare Well by Walter de la Mare

When I lie where shades of darkness
Shall no more assail mine eyes,
Nor the rain make lamentation
When the wind sighs;
How will fare the world whose wonder
Was the very proof of me?
Memory fades, must the remembered
Perishing be?

Oh, when this my dust surrenders
Hand, foot, lip, to dust again,
May these loved and loving faces
Please other men!
May the rusting harvest hedgerow
Still the Traveller’s Joy entwine,
And as happy children gather
Posies once mine.

Look thy last on all things lovely,
Every hour. Let no night
Seal thy sense in deathly slumber
Till to delight
Thou have paid thy utmost blessing;
Since that all things thou wouldst praise
Beauty took from those who loved them
In other days

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work creating the fine PoetryMagnumOpen resource.

My example poem

Tommy Teased Me (The de la Mare)

Tommy Teased Me

Tommy teased me to distraction
told me I was “just a girl”.
N’er-the-less he told all strangers-
I was his pearl.
Tommy taught me worms aren’t icky,
showed me how to fly a kite.
I most miss him in the daytime
Mom cries at night.

How I hope that heaven’s happy,
Daddy says that’s where he went.
Now there is a hole beside me
since his ascent.
Pictures on the fireplace mantle
Tell the tales of trips we shared
Mostly I’ll miss Tommy’s teasing
because he cared.

© Lawrencealot – June 11,2014

Visual Template

The de la Mare

The de Tabley

• The de Tabley is a verse form patterned after Chorus from Medea by John Leicester Warren, Lord de Tabley (1835-1895). De Tabley’s poetry reflected his study of the classics and his passion for detail.

The de Tabley is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
○ metric, alternating iambic pentameter and iambic trimeter lines. L1 of each stanza begins with a trochee
○ rhymed, rhymed scheme abab cdcd etc.

Chorus from Medea by John Leicester Warren, Lord de Tabley

SWEET are the ways of death to weary feet,
Calm are the shades of men.
The phantom fears no tyrant in his seat,
The slave is master then.

Love is abolish’d; well, that this is so;
We knew him best as Pain.
The gods are all cast out, and let them go!
Who ever found them gain?

Ready to hurt and slow to succour these;
So, while thou breathest, pray.
But in the sepulchre all flesh has peace;
Their hand is put away.

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668>
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the fine PMO resource.

My example poem

An Old Man’s Dog (The de Tably)

Fate had to play a part in bringing you
looking at pups that day.
Your wife thought it was something fun to do,
and thus you said okay.

Tiny, and still unsteady on my feet,
knowing we had a fit,
I curled up in your hand and felt complete.
How soon you did commit!

Less than a minute passed before we knew
we’d be each other’s pride.
The bond, so evident twixt me and you,
the kennel-master cried.

Never was I an incidental pet
Not just a thing or toy;
We taught each other and we’re learning yet,
thus multiplying joy.

Chewing on shoes is part of puppyhood
and I did spoil one pair.
You said, “Bad dog!” to me, then like you should
hid them from me somewhere.

Bad Dog! became a phrase without a smile
warning me to change my ways.
Those words I haven’t heard now for a while;
I try to earn your praise.

Likely I’ll live until you die my friend.
I’ll miss you every day
and dream of you each night until my end.
I hope it works that way.

Should I become so ill I cannot cope
please take me to the vet.
That in your arms I pass, remains my hope;
just give me one more pet.

© Lawrencealot – June 27, 2014

Visual Template

The de Tabley

EPJohnson Quintet

This is a form I simply documented, attributing it to Emily Pauline Johnson, because in the four hundred twenty plus forms I have documented, I’ve never come across a quintet with this rhyme pattern.  I used the first stanza of her poem “The Lost Lagoon” as the template for the metric schema.
The form is stanzaic, consisting of two or more quintets.
It is of Canadian origin.
The rhyme scheme is abbba accca…etc.
 (Indicating that the ending words of L1 and L5 are repeated in each stanza.)
It is syllabic: 8/9/9/9/8
The short lines are anapest, anapest, iamb
da da DUM da da DUM da DUM
With the  middle three lines being iamb,iamb,anapest,iamb
da DUM da DUM da da DUM da DUM
My example poem:
Surviving

When a brother is left behind
it’s seldom thought that his time was due.
No battle raged, and the sky was blue,
the day that Tim told us he was through.
“I’ve no more strength that I can find.”

We would not leave our friend behind.
he talked about his sweet wife, his mom,
his father’s farm, his young brother Tom
his faith in God, which so helped becalm
him all things good that he could find.

When we found those we’d left behind
to greet with loving so very warm
and praises we had escaped from harm–
we traveled next to Tim’s father’s farm
for in our hearts still Tim we find.

© Lawrencealot – February 19, 2014

Visual Template

 

Triquain

Triquain…created by Shelley Cephas,
A Triquain is a seven line poem with syllables in multiples of 3 as follows:
3, 6, 9, 12, 9, 6, 3 This form is always centered.
syllabic,3/6/9/12/9/6/3,unrhymed,7 lines
ALWAYS Centered
 
 
Example Poem:
 

Interim Heaven  (Triquain chain – Cephas) 

 
The puppy
brought to the hospital
where the boy was dying adopted
him on first sight.  The lad’s pain was subdued by drugs.
Nothing could subdue the instant joy
filling him as he hugged
The puppy.
 
The cancer
would not relent, and yet
the boy’s eyes were brighter than before
and he never cried another day.  The puppy
snuggled when he slept and licked his face;
played gently other times
with the boy.
 
When the boy
passed on while he slept, the
puppy knew and whined, parents wept.  In
tears a younger brother took the pup, who shut up
and licked away that boy’s tears.  Wiping
grief away, replacing
it with love.
 
(c) Lawrencealot – May 7,2012
 
 
Visual Template:

As it happened, the Triquain above was the first one that I encountered.
It was not however, the first form given the name.

• The Triquain, found in Berg’s Pathways for the Poet 1977 appears to be an attempt at combining the haiku and Crapsey cinquain. It was created by L. Stanley Cheney and referred to in both the Caulkins’ Handbook and Pathways. This form comes a little closer to the purpose of haiku than some other haiku wannabees. There is another invented form also called a Triquain that appeared on the internet about 25 years later written in a syllabic heptastich.

The Triquain is:
○ a tristich, a poem in 3 lines. It is composed in 3 units, L1 introduces the subject, L2 expands and leads into action, L3 is the enlightenment or question.
○ syllabic, with 2-7-7 syllable count per line.
○ Titled, unlike the haiku.

stud by Judi Van Gorder

newborn
leggy colt struggles to stand
first of many challenges

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1188#triquain
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Inquiry (Triquan-Cheney)

questions
preceding words, as babble
most unanswered before death

(c) Lawrencealot – October 29, 2014

 

YaDu

S.E.Asia. (Burma)
Ya Du
 
The yadu is a Burmese climbing-rhyme verse. Each of the stanzas —up to three in all— has 5 lines. The first four lines have 4 syllables each, and the last one can have 5, 7, 9, or 11 syllables. The last two lines rhyme in the usual way. The climbing rhymes occur in syllables four, three, and two of both the first three lines and the last three lines of a stanza. There should be a reference to the seasons since the word yadu means “the seasons.
As the Than Bauk is to the Haiku, then the Ya Du is to the Tanka
and consists of four syllable lines and a fifth one that can
comprise of 5, 7, 9,or 11 syllables.
The staircase rule applies to the four lines,
and the last syllable of the fourth and fifth
line must rhyme, giving a pattern of:
O. O. O. a.
O. O. a. O
O. a. O. b
O. O. b. c.
O. O. O. O. O. O. O. O. c.

Related forms:  Than-BaukThan-Bauk PoemYaDu,  Ya Hoo.

Example Poem
Blue sky’s curved moon
appeared at noon, as
gray loon’s song note
surged afloat clouds —
bird’s songs circled dreams, quietly abound.
We watched it stay
on its way, silk
breaths swayed tree leaves;
freshly weaved thoughts
seized summer notions the afternoon moon brought.
Visual Template