Virelet

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Virelet is an invented variation of the French Virelai and was introduced by Viola Berg.

The Virelet is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
○ isometric with a stanzaic frame of long/short/long/short lines set by the first stanza. The actual metric length and pattern of the alternate lines is at the discretion of the poet.
○ rhymed, interlocking rhyme abab bcbc cdcd etc.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

I Would Have, Sure (Virelet)
(inspired by Amera’s “How to Get Pregnant”

She’ll be a mom
and she knows who’s the dad.
It wasn’t Tom,
or Dick or someone bad.

Though many lad
would likely like to claim
that they had had
relations with that dame.

None could you blame
for lusting after her
but all the same,
she waited to be sure.

© Lawencealot -September 29, 2014

Visual Template

Note: This is illustrative only, the lines can be of any two consistent lengths.

Virelet

Carol

Carol
Type: Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Other Requirement, Stanzaic
Description: Carols started out as a form of singing circular folk dance. Plato inveighed against their ancestors, so there must be something good about them.
Carols do vary widely in form, especially these days, but back around the 15th century, they were more standardized.
A carol started out with a “burden” or short chorus. This was usually a rhymed couplet. That was followed by verses that were often short-lined quatrains with rhyme of bbba. The last lines of the quatrains were sometimes a foot or so shorter than the other three. The burden might appear as a chorus between verses, or it might be used as two refrains that appeared as the last line of the verses. There were many variations, but this covers the basics.
Schematic:
The pattern of burden and verse might look like this:

xxxxxxxa
xxxxxxxa

xxxxxxxb
xxxxxxxb
xxxxxxxb
xxxxxa
Rhythm/Stanza Length: 4

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/000/32.shtml
My Thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his work on the wonderful poetrybase resource.

 

The Carol Old French-carola-a ring dance accompanied by song, is a joyous hymn. Originally it was a medieval festive religious verse coming from the tradition of religious dance. The French Noël, is also a Carol, it is a “joyous song of nativity”. The French Carola and Noël are a thematic genre with the structure at the discretion of the poet, both predate the English Carol. The word Carol has become associated with Christmas and Easter because of its French origin and because the verse in England centered on celebrations that replaced the pagan winter and spring festivities. Today in America we often think of the Carol as any Christmas song.

The poetic pattern or stanzaic form recognized as the Carol fell into place sometime in 15th century England just about the same time that dance was being discouraged from the religious celebration. The clerics regarded dance as the survival of pagan influence and the lyrics of some of the earliest Carols seem to support that theory as they were often highly erotic.

• The Carol Texte or Burden is the couplet refrain that is repeated throughout the poem. It is the primary theme of the poem and in particular the refrain line of the Carol.

The Carol is
• metered or folk rhythm, most often trimeter or carrying 3 stresses. Whatever is used, it should be a running meter (lines the same length)
• stanzaic, made up of any number of quatrains alternating with a Carol Texte or Burden (rhyming couplet). There can be variations on stanza length but the quatrain is the most popular, the Burden always remains a couplet.
• written with an alternating refrain. The lines of the Carol Texte alternate as a refrain from quatrain to quatrain.
• rhymed, with a predominant rhyme scheme of A¹A², bbbA¹, cccA², dddA¹ and so on. There can be variation in rhyme scheme but mono rhyme is the most common.
• joyous.

Here is a variation of the Carol, combining the ancient and the modern. Here the “burden” is repeated intact between quatrains. Creating a rhyme scheme,
A¹A², bbba, A¹A², ccca A¹A², ddda, A¹A².

A Present for Both by Rex Allen Brewer 8-5-05

Lets turn the lights down low,
I like to do it slow.

I like to touch your skin,
I like the mood we’re in,
I like the way you grin,
I want you now, I know.

Lets turn the lights down low,
I like to do it slow.

I love to watch your face,
that smile when we embrace,
its classic style and grace,
cool lips and eyes that glow.

Lets turn the lights down low,
I like to do it slow.

I like to make you move,
and see you find your groove,
I hope that you approve,
hold tight, don’t let me go.

Lets turn the lights down low,
I like to do it slow.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=655#burden
My thanks to Judi Van Gorden for year of work on this fine PMO resource.

Since the above example in done in iambic trimeter, I’ll write mine according to the olde time specs.

My example

When the Nest is Full (Carol)

I like to play when we’re alone
and I can make you sigh and moan.

It used to be we had all day,
we were alone and we could play
most anywhere or any way
and wild the oats were sown.

I like to play when we’re alone
and I can make you sigh and moan.

Then children on the scene arrived
and though our urges still survived
of freedom now we’ve been deprived
by children of our own.

I like to play when we’re alone
and I can make you sigh and moan.

It seems to take appointments now
for me to bed my pretty frau.
We lock our door and sneak somehow
or frequently postpone.

I like to play when we’re alone
and I can make you sigh and moan.

We own a house- so how the hell
did we end up in some motel?
It’s your fault, you know very well,
for sighing on the phone.

I like to play when we’re alone
and I can make you sigh and moan.

© Lawrencealot – August 4, 2014

Visual Template of this Carol

Carol

The Chesterson

This is a poetry form used by Gilbert Keith Chesterton, (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936) better known as G.K. Chesterton, was an English writer,lay theologian, poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, literary and art critic, biographer, and Christian apologist. He used it to write the epic: The Ballad of the White Horse.

The Chesterson
Stanzaic: Any number of sestets.
Metered: The 2nd and 6th line are Iambic trimeter, the rest iambic tetrameter.
Rhymed: abaaab

My example poem

The Night I Didn’t Go to Jail (The Chesterton)

Midnight adventures; too much drink
had landed me in jail
more often than I’d like to think.
Tonight you found me on the brink
and posited that I re-think.
You had no cash for bail.

“That drink is just a substitute
for being with a girl.
Although I’m just a prostitute
you told me that you thought I’m cute.
The cops can never prosecute
if freely we do whirl.”

I’ve never quite been eighty-sixed
in such a pleasant way.
I briefly found myself transfixed
my mind was numb, my feelings mixed,
until to mine, her lips affixed;
now everything’s okay.

© Lawrencealot – June 20, 2014

Visual Template

The Chesterson

Wounded Couplet poetry form

This is a form invented by Lisa Morris , aka Streambed on Allpoetry.

This form contains within its rhyming pattern, two couplets, one of which seems wounded, and is wrapped by four other lines, hence some rationale for its name.

It is stanzaic, consisting of any number of octains.
It is syllabic 10/10/6/10/10/10/10/10
It is metric, using iambic meter.

It is rhymed, the pattern being: abccbadd

Example Poem

 

Elixir     (Wounded Couplet)

My lover went a wandering I think
for he believes that magic will restore
his potency and verve.
He wants to play around is all.  What nerve!
He claims he’s seeking mermaids by the shore
to find for him an elixir to drink.
Which beats testosterone in every way
whenever fortitude comes into play.

 

The tavern called the “Wharf” is near the beach
and frequently young barmaids catch his eye
(which seldom scans the shore.)
Perhaps it’s just the scanty clothes they wore
I guess he’ll look for fairies by and by.
The man’s intent let’s try not to impeach.
If elixir’s at home in foaming glass
he’ll need a test, and’s sure to make a pass.

 

I figured then that two could play that game
so put on fairy costume with a mask
and strode into the bar.
The men’s reactions  bordered on bizarre.
I had five drinks and didn’t have to ask,
But all their pick-up lines were truly lame.
When sitting, my costume revealed my thighs,
which seemed to be a magnet for the guys.

 

My lover was among the gazing flock,
He leered at me with barely hidden lust.
His fairy had appeared.
The absence of a potion was not feared,
as his eyes roamed from ankles up to bust.
His codpiece was enlarged, and not with socks.
The elixir was visual nothing more.
Adventure comes to men when they explore.

 

I saw some girls were equally entranced
with fairy wings and panty showing skirt,
and thus I tweaked my plan
and this is how my fairy tale began.
I planned and schemed and still had time to flirt
and with each wink I found my plan enhanced.
With stealth each girl departed then came back
prepared to mount our fairy tale attack.

 

Each girl returned in fairy tale attire
and each in turn gave their farewell that night
then walked out to the sea.
We danced and splashed and shared a fine esprit
and spoke of fairy kings and mortal’s plight
and all the fantasy the men require.
My lover saw his fairies on the beach
but all of us were well beyond his reach.

 

When I got home light hues announced the dawn;
my drunken lover was unconscious yet.
He needed all his sleep.
As planned, his dreams were bothersome and deep.
He woke and pulled me close and said, “Annette,
It frightened me when last night you were gone.
It gave me pause and gave me cause to grieve.
I’ll not again go chasing make believe.”

© Lawrencealot – April 14, 2014

Visual Template

Tanaga

  • The Tanaga is a Filipino stanzaic form that was originally written in Tagolog which to my ear is one of the more musical of languages. (Kumusta ka? Mabuti salam at) The form dates back to the 16th century and has an oral tradition. The poems are not titled. Each is emotionally charged and asks a question that begs an anwer. This form was found at Kaleidoscope.The Tanaga is:
    • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
    • syllabic, 7-7-7-7 syllables per line.
    • rhymed, originally aaaa bbbb cccc etc., modern Tanagas also use aabb ccdd etc or abba cddc etc or any combination rhyme can be used.
    • composed with the liberal use of metaphor.
    • untitled.

Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO.

My Example Poem

(Tanaga)

Casually boys contemplate,
Carefully they cogitate,
what will they appreciate
when they’re searching for a mate?

Will she need to cook and sew?
I suspect the answer’s no.
Will she need to use a wrench,
or speak Mandarin or French?

Need she work with quilting thread,
or perform with brush or pen?
I think I’ll say no again-
if she pleases him in bed.

© Lawrencealot – March 3, 2014

Visual Template

Note: For example only I used one of each rhyme pattern here.

Gwadodyn

This is a complex form for which I found disparate specifications on the internet.
What is certain is:
It is an old Welsh form
It is syllabic, usually 9/9/10/9
It is stanzaic, usually quatrains or sestets
It is rhyming, usually mono-rhyme of the 9 syllable lines
And with internal and/or interleaved rhyme for the long line.
Here are the better references I used:
The gwawdodyn is a Welsh poetic form with a couple variations. However, both versions are comprised of quatrains (4-line stanzas) that have a 9/9/10/9 syllable pattern and matching end rhymes on lines 1, 2, and 4. The variations are made in that third line:
  • One version has an internal rhyme within the third line. So there’s a rhyme somewhere within the third line with the end rhyme on the third line.
  • The other version has an internal rhyme within the third line that rhymes with an internal rhyme in the fourth line.
In both cases, the rhyme starts somewhere in the middle of the third line and it is a unique rhyme to the end rhyme in lines 1, 2, and 4.
Here’s a possible diagram for the first version (with the x’s symbolizing syllables):
1-xxxxxxxxa
2-xxxxxxxxa
3-xxxxbxxxxb
4-xxxxxxxxa
Note: The “b” rhyme in the middle of line 3 could slide to the left or right as needed by the poet.
Here’s an example I wrote for the first version:
“Cheat,” by Robert Lee Brewer
The rumors you’ve heard are true: I run
to forget my past. What I have won,
I’ve lost in lasting memories, blasting
through my brain like bullets from a gun.
As you can see, “run,” “won,” and “gun” rhyme with each other, as do “lasting” and “blasting.”
*****
*****
Here’s a possible diagram for the second version:
1-xxxxxxxxa
2-xxxxxxxxa
3-xxxxbxxxxx
4-xxxbxxxxa
Note: In this version, both “b” rhymes can slide around in their respective lines, which affords the poet a little extra freedom.
Here’s my example modified for the second version:
“Cheat,” by Robert Lee Brewer
The rumors you’ve heard are true: I run
to forget my past. What I have won,
I’ve lost in lonley moments, my sorrow
my only friend while others are stunned.
In this version, “run,” “won,” and “stunned” rhyme (okay, “stunned” is a slant rhyme), while “lonely” and “only” rhyme inside lines 3 and 4.
Please play around with the form this week, because it’ll be the focus of the next WD Poetic Form Challenge starting next week.
******
A big thanks to Robert Lee Brewer
Gwawdodyn, gwow-dód-in-heer (gwad = poem) is the 20th codified, Official Welsh Meter, an Awdl. It is a combination of a cyhydded naw ban couplet followed by either a toddaid or cyhydedd hir couplet.The Gwawdodyn is:
  • is stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains made up of a Cyhydedd Naw Ban couplet followed by either a Toddaid or Cyhydedd Hir.
  • syllabic, L1,L2,L4 are 9 syllable lines and L3 is a 10 syllable line.
  • when written with a cyhydedd hir couplet the stanza is
    • rhymed aaba, with L3 internal rhyme and L4 cross rhymed b.
  • when written with a Toddaid
    • mono-rhymed.
    • composed with gair cyrch following the main rhyme and caesura of L3. The gair cyrch end rhyme is echoed in the first half of L4 in secondary rhyme, assonance or consonance.
x x x x x x x x a
x x x x x x x x a
x x x x b x x x x b
x x x x b x x x a
x x x x x x x x c
x x x x x x x x c
x x x x d x x x x d
x x x x d x x x a
with Toddaid
x x x x x x x x a
x x x x x x x x a
x x x x x x x b – x c
x x x x c x x x b
x x x x x x x x d
x x x x x x x x d
x x x x x x x e – x f
x x x x f x x x e
House of Stone Turns to Sand by Judi Van Gorder
Ballots stolen, voters turned away,
but dead men will vote twice on the day.
No new fields to plow, there is no work now,
no sweat on the brow, no one to care?
Mugabe builds his army of boys
they now shoulder guns instead of toys
He took back white-farms without care – the fields
without yields leave black cupboards bare.
Sick mother has no milk for baby,
a crocodile barks in the belly.
Mother is dying, baby is crying
no one defying, no one will dare.
(Zimbabwe is Shona for house of stone)This poem uses Cyhydedd Hir end couplets in stanza 1 & 3 and Toddaid end couplet in stanza 2. I couldn’t resist creating a main rhyme in stanza 2 that was also a linking rhyme between all stanzas.
A big thanks to Judi Van Gorder
Gwawdodyn Hir
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Stanzaic
Description:
(gwow DOD in heer) A syllabic form that can go in two ways. Either way it consists of a syllabic sestet where all lines except the fifth are nine syllables and monorhymed. The fifth line is ten syllables and has a separate rhyme that may be internal (fifth and tenth syllable) or cross-rhymed with the sixth line (seventh through the ninth syllable of fifth line cross-rhymes with third through the fifth in sixth line).
Origin:
Welsh
Schematic:
xxxxxxxxa
xxxxxxxxa
xxxxxxxxa
xxxxxxxxa
xxxxbxxxxb
xxxxxxxxa
or
xxxxxxxxa
xxxxxxxxa
xxxxxxxxa
xxxxxxxxa
xxxxxxbxxx  (Syllable 7 to 9)
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
A Big thanks to Bob Newman
My Example
Uninvited      (Gwadodyn

My girl gone- my love unrequited
left me lonely and not delighted.
I gave girl next door transport from the store,
that and nothing more! How short-sighted.
You’d think perhaps I’d been benighted
I did not know what I’d ignited
That gal didn’t knock; my door wasn’t locked
from sleep I was shocked yet excited.
That she was nude was now high-lighted
by her chills that I soon had righted.
That she had applied could not be denied,
but midnight rides must be invited.
© Lawrencealot – December 25, 2013

Related Welch form at HERE.

Visual Templates

Impressionist

The Impressionist form was invented by Pamela Santini, writing on AllPoetry as Stands_In_Awe
It is a nine stanza poem
It is syllabic.
 The first eight stanzas consist of both a four and five syllable line, in either order, followed by a “quip” of one or two words limited to three syllables.
The final stanza consists of a pair of four syllable lines each followed by one of the “quips” previously used.
Example Poem
Unselfish Selfies
He wants to see some
more of me, I’m
Supposing.
The pic goes with the
sexting that I’m
composing.
So my face is not
all that I’ll be
exposing.
Several simple
sexy selfies I’m
enclosing.
Exactly what I’ll
show I’m not now
disclosing.
But I’ll bet my butt
it keeps him from
dozing,
stimulates and moves
him closer to
proposing.
I’ll sign myself, “all
yours, with love”, in
closing.
Selfies work when
Exposing;
that’s what girls are
supposing.
© December 16, 2014
Visual Template:
Note: Either the first or the second line
of each tercet may have five syllables.

Tableau

      • The Tableau is an invented stanzaic form that paints a single image in keeping with the name of the form, tableau meaning picture. Created byEmily Romano who suggests the word “tableau” be included in the title. The Tableau is:
        • stanzaic, written in any number of sixains.
        • isosyllabic, 5 syllable lines.
        • rhyme at the discretion of the poet.
        • written describing a single image.
        • written with a title that includes the word “tableau”.
With thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful PMO resource.

I changed syllabic above to
      • isosyllabic 5 syllable lines, indicating all lines are the same length.

The Tableau, a poetry form created by Emily Romano in October of 2008, consists of one or more verses, each having six lines. Each line should have five beats (syllables). There is no set rhyme scheme, although rhyme may be present. The title should contain the word tableau.
Write one stanza only.
Since the dictionary states the word tableau means picture or representation, the poem should reflect this. A picture should come to mind as the poem is read.

example:
Graveside Tableau
Sunlight cannot warm
The corpse of the bairn
Who drowned in the loch;
Stoic the father,
Silent the mother,
While a spinster weeps
Copyright © 2008 Emily Romano
My Example Poem
The Sting Tableau
Her felicity
and non-verbal cues
were evocative;
when his cash came out
then so did her badge.
© Lawrencealot – August 21, 2013

KyRenn

This form was created by Kylie Routley, aka KyRenn on Allpoetry.
It consist of six quatrains, each set of three having only two rhymes.
Verse one and two being mono-rhyme, and verse three being alternating or cross rhyme.
Specifications not confirmed on meter and line length.
Be consistent.
A six stanza, mono-rhyme form with the following
Rhyme Scheme: aaaa bbbb abab cccc dddd cdcd
 
 Example Poem
 
Form a Study Group (KyRenn)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In lieu of study I chased skirts, 
Could not resist a girl that flirts. 
In life’s a meal they were desserts. 
Their pheromones are my alerts.

When any girl would wish to play, 
she knew she’d get this guy’s okay. 
If there’s  a party – right this way,
just hurry, hurry, ándale.*

My education, this subverts, 
this frivolity on display. 
I think to change, but mind reverts- 
Exciting curves!  Enticing sway!

I’d never cause a girl to fret 
or leave my presence with regret 
or leave them wanting on a bet 
should their own appetite be whet.

If fun is mutual and fair 
and drug abuse you do not bear 
just seize the joy while it is there 
for when you’re eighty you won’t care.

If on the way a mate is met
and each excites each anywhere, 
that is as good as things can get, 
so marry her and homework share.

© Lawrencealot – July 4th, 2013

 
 
  * The term ándale is variously used in Mexican slang to mean come, or okay, or finally.
 
 
Here is a Visual Template 
for an Iambic Tetrameter version:
 
 
 
 

Raconteur

This is a new refrain poetry form invented by Elizabeth Reed, aka Silverechoes on Allpoetry.

The form is made up of 13 lines – two six-line stanzas and one final line. The two stanzas tell the majority of the story, and the first line of the second stanza should serve as the inspiration for the title (though not required). The last line will be a restatement or rephrasing of the first line of the second stanza. Rhyme scheme and corresponding syllable counts are as follows:
a (8 syllables)
b (9 syllables)
C (10 syllables)
a (8)
b (9)
C (10) (uses same word as line 3 for end-line rhyme)
D (8)
e (9)
F (10)
d (8)
e (9)
F (10) (same end word as line 9)
D (8 OR 10 syllables) (same end word as line 7)
In the rhyme pattern indicated by abCabCDeFdeFD, the lines indicated with capitals contain word refrains.
Example Poem
 
We Missed the Dance
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“Does my old cowboy hat look fine?”
you asked me just as we were leaving.
I turned and looked, and ran into the door.
“Well dear, I d say you look divine,”
“What hat?”-  My eyes were they deceiving?
There were those pokey things that I adore.
“If we perchance can miss the dance
and settle later just for dining
I think I’d rather stay at home instead
exploring signs of our romance
which we can do while we’re reclining.”
With that she led me to our bed instead..
And so we once again have missed the dance.
© Lawrencealot – September 10, 2013
(Notice: Being rebellious, I chose phonic identity, instead of absolute identity in choosing the “C” refrain.