Staccato

The Staccato, created by Jan Turner, consists of two or more 6-line stanzas.
 
Rhyme scheme: aabbcc.
*Required internal rhyme scheme interplay between line #1 and line #2 (see below explanation and examples).
 
Meter:  10/10/8/8/10/10
 
Repeats: This form requires a 2-syllable repeat in Lines #3 and #6 as specified below.
 
As in a musical notation, The Staccato poetry form uses
short repeats which are abruptly disconnected
elements. The repeat words are read as rapid-fire speech,
such as staccato music when played or sung.
This form lends itself to strong emotion or instruction
(i.e. military poems: “Charge on! Charge on!” etc.),
a declaration (such as of an event: “We’re married!
We’re married!” etc.), an instruction or emphasis of
human emotion (such as love, hate, longing: “Be mine!
Be mine!” etc.), strong observation (such as
“Those eyes! Those eyes!” etc.) or any similar
situation where a strong staccato repeat is desired.
 
The emphatic two-syllable repeat in this poetry form
is written twice, consecutively, at the beginning of
Line #3 (each repeat in Line #3 is followed by an exclamation mark),
 and once again at the beginning of Line #6
(with or without an exclamation mark in Line #6).
 
Also, Line #2 requires an internal rhyme scheme that rhymes
with a word within Line #1, usually falling on
the 6th syllable (see examples below), but can fall earlier
in those two lines as long as the internal rhyme
matches the syllabic stress in both lines .
 
Example Poem
 
Let’s Write a Staccato
 
A staccato let’s write, right here and now.
It’s simple, really quite forward, here’s how.
Notice! Notice! Internal rhyme
in lines one and two just in time
for a repeated exclamation, yet
notice third repeat may in quiet set.
 
That inversion my dear, was just for show
to make the rhyme quite clear of course you know.
I know! I know! Poor form to teach
Is most certainly a bad breach.
Since this poem with that err I fetter
I know you, my readers, can do better.
 
(c) Lawrencealot – September 11, 2012
 
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Swap Ottava


Created by Discoveria of Allpoetry.com.

The form has an Ottava Rima framework in which the sections of the first line are swapped to become the last line of the stanza.
 
A Double Swap Ottava
requires that technique to be applied to two of the early lines, normally Line 1 and 2, to become the closing couplet of the octet.
 
 
Minimum length 8 Lines, no maximum
Meter: Iambic pentameter
Rhyme: ababaabcc
 
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Example Poem:


Synchonicty   (Swap Ottava)

 
A random meet- a gift of God’s great plan.
She stepped into the bus I seldom take. 
I looked at her is how it all began. 
I found her cute, I was not on the make. 
My glance became a stare as a glance can. 
Our eyes met, then moved on for manner’s sake. 
She looked again ,and smiled; the smile was sweet.
A gift of God’s great plan– a random meet.

 
It is likely by chance: meeting a mate. 
This woman’s smile was brief, beguiling,  true. 
Not just her lips, but her eyes were more bait. 
I’d hoped that my face invited her too. 
My shyness abated… let me test fate. 
There may be no chance if I now eschew 
risking rejection.  I’ll ask her to dance. 
Meeting a mate: it is likely by chance.

 
One out of three: seems like the odds are fine 
This lady gave me her number and said, 
“I think I’d like that, but first let us dine”. 
A note for ladies… you take charge instead. 
Meet where you can leave if  things misalign. 
‘Cause likely, like me, guys want you in bed.
Results run the gamut, but try, be free. 
Seems like the odds are fine: one out of three. 
 


(c) Lawrencealot – April, 2012


Example of Double Swap Ottava



Social Schism  (Double Swap Ottava)

Some do less, some do more to help the whole. 

all members knew the score when tribes were small. 
Great hunters, all the members would extoll. 
Their prowess was a benefit for all. 
The tribes were healthy when each played their role, 
Our tribe will fail if no one heeds that call. 
When tribes were small all members knew the score. 
To help the whole,  some do less, some do more. 

© Lawrencealot – January 2, 2013 

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Tempo Composto

Tempo Composto means “time’s up” in Latin.

A form invented by L. Allen Bacon, aka Allen a Dale of Allpoetry.

The first three stanzas of a “tempo composto” are made up of
1) A Spondee (DA-DA)
2) two lines of Dactyl (DA-da-da)
3) 12 syllables free verse.

The fourth stanza differs in that the final line is only
4 syllables of free verse.

The rhyme pattern is
a-a-x-x
b-b-x-x
c-c-x-x
d-d-x-x

Looks good centered, but that is not a requirement.

Example Poem

Ride in the Country
Roadside
countryside
Lemonade
For sale sign draws me in to find they have just corn.
Quite hot!
Day is shot.
I have got
no lemonade. Drive on looking for the next stand.
Need gas,
Still I pass
twenty-one
stations looking for fruit stand, then run out of gas.
Walk back!
Station sez,
Out of gas,
Got lemonade.
(c) Lawrencealot – May 30, 2012
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Terza Rima

Terza Rima, “third rhyme”, adapted from the Italian poets of the 13th century is a stanzaic form that employs a pattern of interlocking rhyme. Some connect the form’s origins to the three-lined Ritournel, which was an early Italian form of popular poetry, but others to the Sirventes of the Provencal troubadours. It is most likely the latter because the Tuscan poets of the 13th century tended to emulate the metrical patterns of their predecessors, the Provencals.

Written in tercets of interlocking rhyme known as the Sicilian tercet, there is no limit on the number of stanzas in the poem, however it is difficult to divide without breaking the continuity of the rhyme. It was Dante’s, The Divine Comedy written in 1307, that brought the Terza Rima from folk-verse, to a major poetic form.

• The Capitolo is framed with the same metric, rhyme and stanzaic structure as the Terza Rima. In 15th century Italy when the Terza Rima adopted didactic subjects, it was called a Capitolo but by the 19th century the term Capitolo was used for a Terza Rima frame with a satirical or light subject.

The Terza Rima and Capitolo are:
• narrative and/or lyrical poetry.
• in English usually iambic pentameter but can be written in tetrameter.
• stanzaic, with any number of tercets that interlock by rhyme. The poem is concluded by a single final line that rhymes with the 2nd line of the preceding tercet.
• rhymed in an interlocking rhyme scheme aba bcb cdc ded . . . until the conclusion when the end line rhymes with the 2nd line of the last tercet.
• when written in a satirical tone, is called a Capitolo.

Hand in my Back by Judi Van Gorder
I’ve felt the pure persuasive power of God,
a mighty hand placed squarely in my back
that gently pushes me to tread unshod.

He’s sure and solid, taking up all slack,
reminding me He’s here and He is strong
and I am not alone against the pack.

When I am lost and life is going wrong
the earth beneath me shifts like desert sand
it’s then I seek to hear Him in a song
and feel His hand that seers me with His brand.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1146
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

_____

Terza Rima is a chained form with three-line stanzas (tercets). In each stanza, the first and third lines rhyme. The second line rhymes with the first and third lines of the next stanza. There are three different ways of ending the poem:
• a final line that rhymes with the middle line of the previous stanza
• a final pair of lines, both of which rhyme with the middle line of the previous stanza
• a final tercet, using the same rhymes as the previous stanza, but transposed i.e. the last two stanzas rhyme aba bab.
Here’s a short example:

Stranded on Cheam station

Nothing but the tick of the station clock,
And the sound of the wind in the trees
That grow untended between the tracks.

This is the way it will be in the last days.
Machines stand idle with none to work them.
Doors swing and chatter in the breeze.

In a world indifferent, blandly suburban,
Shops open, unstaffed, are making no sale.
Foxes roam free in overgrowing gardens.

Streetlamps stay lit, till the elements fail.
Alarms are all false; no-one is alerted.
Man’s handiwork crumbles into new soil.

Cameras scan blindly, the bypass deserted,
The last ever up-train long since departed.

This precise form and length of terza rima happens to have 14 lines, and is therefore sometimes known as a terza rima sonnet – though some would quibble over whether it was a “proper” sonnet.
We could end it in either of the other two ways if we replaced the final couplet by just:

Cameras scan blindly, the bypass deserted.
or by the tercet:

Cameras scan blindly, the bypass deserted.
Horsetails spread, like the rust on the rail,
The last ever up-train long since departed.

Notable Terze Rime
Dante (who invented it) used this form for the entire Divine Comedy.

Pasted from http://www.volecentral.co.uk/vf/terza.htm
My thanks to Bob Newman for is work on the wonderful Volecentral resouce.
_____

Terza Rima
Type:  Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Stanzaic
Description:  Accentual syllabic or syllabic form written in tercets with an interlocking rhyme scheme. At some point, the poem ends with a single line stanza rhyming with the preceding stanza’s middle line.
At least one soi-disant expert claims that it is usually iambic pentameter and that it ends in a couplet as: yzy zz. But he seems to be incorrect on many of his assertions.
Another variation is ending with a uniformly rhymed triplet: aba bcb cdc…yzy zzz.
Why can’t these poets make up their minds or stick to the original?
Origin:  Italian
Schematic:
Rhyme: aba bcb cdc…yzy z
Meter: xX xX xX xX xX
Rhythm/Stanza Length:  3
See Also:
Capitolo, Enclosed Tercet, Enclosed Triplet, Iambic Pentameter, Sicilian Tercet, Sicilian Triplet, Terza Rima Sonnet, Terzanelle, Villanelle xxx

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/003/310.shtm
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

Example Poem:

Second Chance (Form:Terza Rima)

Oh dearest one can you believe that fate
has saved us for each other? Even though
I wanted you, I acted way too late?
When Europe called, with scholarship I know
you had to leave. My duties kept me here,
and let me grieve, still thinking I should go.
Then accident with dad, and duties clear
delayed me; slammed doors. ’til we each were wed.
For both of us our lives were filled with cheer.
New hurts were hurled at both; young spouses dead,
such hateful hurts so thoroughly depriving.
Each now alone, with loneliness ahead.
I found a poem and thru that you–surviving.
You found me, old love, happiness arriving.
© Lawrencealot – January 1, 2014

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Terzanelle

The Terzanelle is a poetry type which is a combination of  the villanelle and the terza rima forms invenated by Lewis Turco.
It is a 19-line poem consisting of five interlocking tercets plus a concluding quatrain in which the first and third lines of the first triplet appear as refrains. The middle line of each triplet is repeated, reappearing as the last line of the succeeding triplet with the exception of the center line of the next-to-the-last stanza which appears in the quatrain.
The rhyme and refrain scheme for the triplets is as follows:
ABA’ bCB cDC dED eFE fAFA‘ or
ABA ‘bCB cDC dED eFE fFAA’ 

Meter is Iambic Pentamter
Example Poem:
Simpler times   (Terzanelle)
The simple times remembered are worthwhile.
Those memories are treasured gifts to keep.
We were innocent and lived without guile.
        
Our curiosity was very deep,
inviting us always to be alive.
Those memories are treasured gifts to keep.
        
Adults have designed their plans to survive
we have a docket that precludes just being–
inviting us always to be alive.
        
Adults predispose and look without seeing.
Now  we can’t dawdle, we all must compete
we have a docket that precludes just being–
        
As kids, a mistake was not a defeat,
we had no agenda but just to be
Now  we can’t dawdle, we all must compete
        
Adults must relearn that gift, to be free.
The simple times remembered are worthwhile.
we had no agenda but just to be.
We were innocent and lived without guile.
By Lawrencealot, © 2012, All rights reserved.
 
 
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Tetractys

Tetractys, a poetic form invented by Ray Stebbing, 
consists of at least 5 lines of  1/2/3/4/10 syllables (total of 20).
Tetractys can be written with more than one verse, but must follow suit with an inverted syllable count.
Tetractys can also be reversed and written 10/4/3/2/1.
Double Tetractys:  1/2/3/4/10/10/4/3/2/1
Triple Tetractys:  1/2/3/4/10/10/4/3/2/1/1/2/3/4/10
Example Poem

What?  Now?

Half
of the
populous
always want sex.
Women I think, tend to be more choosy.

(c) Lawrencealot – 2013

Time Coupletnelle

This is a form invented by MystiqueWizzard, aka Alberto Jose Alvarez Gonzalez

The Time Coupletnelle is a 16-line poem conformed by 8 couplets
with a rhyme scheme  AabbccddccddaA*AA*,
The syllabic progression  is:  9/8/7/6/7/8/9/9

The first 3 couplets represent a “plea”
the 4th couplet is an assertion that portrays what the plea evokes;
the last 3 couplets are the conclusion based on the first 4 couplets.

The themes may vary but basically they´re centered in love, sadness, hope or another strong
emotion worth exploring. It was named “Time Coupletnelle “because it isset in a progression of time and the visual shape is like an hour glass.

The structure should always be centered for visual effect.

Example Poem:

I Must Ask
I can’t carry on without your love.
I go through the actions, just kind of.
I think you like me but how much?
I daydream thinking of your touch.
I wait all week to date you
I’m bewitched is my friends’ view.
Action now is required,
waiting time has expired.
This week, waiting time is thru.
A diamond makes its debut.
You’ll see how much you are desired,
how much you’re treasured and admired.
I’ll bring a rose and a turtle dove.
I’ll be your hand, if you’ll  be my glove.
I cannot carry without your love.
I’ll be your hand, if you’ll  be my glove.
© Lawrencealot – October 2, 2012
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Tory Meter

The ToryMeter was invented by Victoria Sutton, known as Passionspromise on Allpoetry. 
An easy form that is similar to the Rictameter with a slightly different approach. Example follows.


2 syllables (R) last line
4 syllables
6 syllables
8 syllables
10 syllables
12 syllables
10 syllables
8 syllables
6 syllables
4 syllables
2 syllables (R) first line (2/4/6/8/10/12/10/8/6/4/2)

 

Rhyme scheme can vary I have done multiple in different end rhymes.
But they must have a rhyme scheme…

Example Poem

Good Friends
Good friends
share anything
because their trust extends
beyond the boundary that will  spring
from propriety and good common sense
between casual friends. Their trust may stem from shared
experiences or things learned at expense
of innocence with feelings bared.
If that trust should fail, how
can they be now
Good friends
© Lawrencealot – April 5, 2012
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In this poem I chose rhyme scheme ababcdcdeea
 
 

Tri-Fall

Tri-fall                                                                
The Tri-fall, created by Jan Turner,                                         
consists three 6-line stanzas, for a total of 18 lines.                         
 
Rhyme Scheme: abcabc                                        
Line-length  for each stanza is as follows: 6/3/8/6/3/8.          
Meter optional
                                                
This form requires little to no punctuation and can be written on any subject matter.     
 
Example Poem
 
  Surrender
 
Her passion was too much.
Now it’s gone.
She condemned, deplored all abuse.
She praised the thrill of touch.
We’ll bear on.
The jealous piled on, no excuse.
 
Her life was filled with hurt.
despite that,
or because of it, she performed
as an erotic flirt.
When at-bat
she homered passion unreformed.
 
Some men became aroused,
not content
to live within her fantasies,
and when requests were doused
time was spent
in fighting her apostasies.
 
 
 
© Lawrencealot – Aug 23, 2012    
Written about a very real AP Poet.
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Trijan Refrain

The Trijan Refrain, created by Jan Turner, consists of three 9-line stanzas, for a total of 27 lines.
Line 1 is the same in all three stanzas,
although a variation of the form is not to repeat the same line
at the beginning of each stanza.
In other words, the beginning line of each stanza can be different.
The first four syllables of line 5 in each stanza are repeated as the
double-refrain for lines 7 and 8. The Trijan Refrain is a rhyming poem
with a set meter and rhyme scheme as follows:
Rhyme scheme: ababccddc
 Meter: 8/6/8/6/8/8/4/4/8
source: shadowpoetry.com
note: on the template below I have colored line 1,
Indicated that in the formal poem it should be first line of each verse.
in the poem below, I followed formal protocol for the first complete Trijan Refrain, then lapsed to the ever more poplular technique of not requiring first line stanza repetion.

Example Poem

(This poem in the strictest sense is NOT a Trijan Refrain, for it violate TWO of the requirements.
It is NOT three stanzas, AND it does not repeat the first line of the first stanza, as the first line
of the other stanza.  It’s failings may make it instructional….)

Crop Circles
Crop Circles are works to amaze.
Sources of awe and hate!
For two score plus, a world-wide craze
to shock and aggravate.
It aggravates the farmers who
lose cash when fields are trampled through.
It aggravates.
It aggravates,
but there’s not much that they can do.
Crop Circles are works to amaze
from ancient times ’til now.
A marvel upon which to gaze,
made in the night somehow.
They were simple in early days.
Mere circles. shown in diff’rent ways.
They were simple,
They were simple.
Complex now, harder to appraise.
Crop Circles are works to amaze
across our planet earth.
Hoaxers we know have made displays
Art forms of splendid girth.
Not all are false; most have proved true.
Could not be made by me or you.
Not all are false,
Not all are false.
Messages require a global view.
Crop formations they are now called.
Using geometry.
Mathematics leave us enthralled
with their complexity,
Math is the same in every land.
Greek, Chinese, Arab understand.
Math is the same.
Math is the same.
So global message must be planned.
Crop formations they are now named,
choose pre-historic sites
like Stonehenge and others so famed
to inscribe their delights.
Unsolved myst’ries believed to be
formed by some intelligentry.
Unsolved myst’ries,
Unsolved myst’ries
clues now distributed widely.
Since I began this poem to write.
This three-D box was made.
Of course it sprang up overnight.
It doesn’t look homemade.
It baffles me what it might mean
laid out so nicely on the green.
It baffles me,
It baffles me.
If it’s a hoax that will be seen.
The Mormons have not staked a claim,
nor have the Jews, I think.
Christians, Buddhists don’t seek acclaim,
some odd cults may, don’t blink.
We don’t know how just over night
Huge shapes appear, proportions right.
We don’t know how,
We don’t know how.
Energy remains at each site.
Mayan themes have been oft addressed.
Celestial cycle lore
hints that earth shall soon be distressed
by changed magnetic core.
We can have help as ancients did,
in building the great pyramid
We can have help,
We can have help.
It could be; that would be splendid.
(c) Lawrencealot – July 6, 2012
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