Vignette Form

The Vignette is also the name of a syllabic invented verse form introduced by Fozari Rockwood found in Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg,1977.
The Vignette is:
a hexastich, an unrhymed poem in 6 lines.
syllabic: 2/4/4/6/7/3  syllables per line.
Example Poem:

Activities Director ( Vignette form )

Supine,
reading a book.
My yorkie drops
his chew ball upon my
chest, holds it with one paw; quiet
bark, “Let’s go.”

Villanelle

Villanelles are required to have an intricate rhyme scheme and two lines that are refrains – like refrains in songs, they get repeated over and over.

The rhyme scheme is AbA’abAabA’abAabA’abAA’, so there are only two rhymes that end all the lines.

In addition, the first line and third line, the refrains, are repeated four times each –
the first line appears at the end of stanzas 2 and 4 and as the second-to-last line in stanza 6.
The poem’s third line appears again at the end of stanzas 3, 5, and 6.

So if we call the first line A and the third line A’, and any line that rhymes with them a,
then the rhyme scheme is: AbA’ abA abA’ abA abA’ abAA’
Example Poem:

Sensuality’s Source

Arousal flows from love’s thought and intent.
Thus age is harmless to this wife of mine.
A tease fulfilled, assures a mates ascent.

Desire for one another will invent
Innumerable paths leading to cloud nine.
Arousal flows from love’s thought and intent.

Performance, age related, has been bent
by years;  her voice and touch revokes decline.
A tease fulfilled,  assures a mates ascent.

A failure now and then she’ll not  resent
If he in other ways her wants enshrine.
Arousal flows from love’s thought and intent.

Endearments overshadow the event
and fill two hearts most willing to entwine.
A tease fulfilled, assures a mates ascent.

Today’s youth may not know how much is meant
by such commitment.  Love makes all things fine.
Arousal flows from love’s thought and intent.
A tease fulfilled, assures a mates ascent.

© Lawrencealot – March, 2012

Visual Template:

Whyquain

A form invented on AllPoetry.com by Gloria Kim, aka Porphery. 
It is a single verse of five iambic tetrameter lines in monorhyme
which answers some asked or un-asked question.
 
Example Poem:
 
Why Do Cats Purr
 
While dogs can bark and growl and grrrr
and guard, and stealthy thieves deter,
which earned their place with men for sure,
The cats had only pretty fur,
so asked if God would add a purr.
Visual Template

Wreath

A Wreath Poem is:
 Any poem which is constructed with or without  rhyme or fixed meter in which every line in to poem is linked to the line preceding it a word or by derivation of  a word  in the preceding line or by a homonym of that word,  or apparently by a derivative of a false rhyme of that word.
They are fun to read, AND write.

Example Poem:

Glued Wreath

I started this poem no topic defined.
Definitely sure something would occur.
Would you believe it? Still I cannot find
a foundation for words which I prefer.
The witch of sticky mucilage has stuck
My muse at large with two wheels off the track.
The traction needed now may call for luck.
Lucky I have been, I just came unstuck.

© Lawrencealot – May 2, 2012

YaDu

S.E.Asia. (Burma)
Ya Du
 
The yadu is a Burmese climbing-rhyme verse. Each of the stanzas —up to three in all— has 5 lines. The first four lines have 4 syllables each, and the last one can have 5, 7, 9, or 11 syllables. The last two lines rhyme in the usual way. The climbing rhymes occur in syllables four, three, and two of both the first three lines and the last three lines of a stanza. There should be a reference to the seasons since the word yadu means “the seasons.
As the Than Bauk is to the Haiku, then the Ya Du is to the Tanka
and consists of four syllable lines and a fifth one that can
comprise of 5, 7, 9,or 11 syllables.
The staircase rule applies to the four lines,
and the last syllable of the fourth and fifth
line must rhyme, giving a pattern of:
O. O. O. a.
O. O. a. O
O. a. O. b
O. O. b. c.
O. O. O. O. O. O. O. O. c.

Related forms:  Than-BaukThan-Bauk PoemYaDu,  Ya Hoo.

Example Poem
Blue sky’s curved moon
appeared at noon, as
gray loon’s song note
surged afloat clouds —
bird’s songs circled dreams, quietly abound.
We watched it stay
on its way, silk
breaths swayed tree leaves;
freshly weaved thoughts
seized summer notions the afternoon moon brought.
Visual Template

Ya Hoo

The Ya Hoo is an enhanced version of the Yadu.
It was invented by Lawrencelot of AP
There are 1 to 3 stanzas, each with five lines.
Each of the first four lines have four syllables.
The last line has either 5, 7, 9 or 11 syllables.
The defining feature of this form is that it has internal staircase rhyme, as does the yadu, but unlike the yadu it has right and left staircases.
Also unlike the yadu, there is NO requirement that the poem have a theme about seasons.
Here is a syllable schematic of the rhyme required.
a.O.O.b
O.a.b.c
d.b.a.e
O.d.e.c
O.e.d.c
Where “–” equals from 1 to 7 syllables.

Related forms:  Than-BaukThan-Bauk PoemYaDu,  Ya Hoo.

Example poem.
Maybe Time, by Lawrencealot
Shine a dim light
of fine nightowl
sky;  white wine pour
for my poorgal. 
She’s sore. Why? I dunno but I see a scowl.
I could propose
then I ‘spose she
would close my night
out good, right?We
don’t fight. Should work for everybody.
Visual Template:

ZaniLa Rhyme

The ZaniLa Rhyme is a poetry form created by Laura Lamarca.

A ZaniLa Rhyme has an minimum of three quatrain stanzas with a specific rhyme scheme and syllable count.
There is no maximum length requirement for the form.

In each stanza, the rhyme scheme is abcb 
and the syllable count is 9/7/9/9.
Along with the end-line rhyme scheme, the ZaniLa Rhyme
also has an internal rhyme in line 3 of each stanza.
Line 3 repeats in all odd-numbered stanzas, as written in stanza one.
In all even-numbered stanzas, line 3 repeats
but the order of the line is reversed.

Example Poem:

Right ZaniLa Wrong   ( ZaniLa Rhyme )

ZaniLa threw me a couple times
So I’ll write another one.
Internal rhyme in this line this time
to illustrate how it should be done.
I had a d-rhyme within my rhymes
and of d’s there should be none.
In this line this time- internal rhyme
in reversed order from when begun.

I can toot the horns and ring the chimes
for I’ve got the battle won.
Internal rhyme in this line this time.
Finally my errors are undone.

     © Lawrencealot – December 30, 2012

 
Visual Template: