Trianglet

• The Trianglet is an invented shape poem found in Berg’s Pathways for the Poet. It forms the shape of a triangle and was created by Mina M Sutherland.

The trianglet is:
○ a decastich, a poem in 10 lines.
○ syllabic, 1-2-3-4-5-5-4-3-2-1 syllables per line.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme AbcxddxcbA
○ composed with the 1st word repeated as the last word.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1001#trianglet
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Yummy (Trianglet)

Yummy

 

Worms
don’t look
delicious
(at least to me),
but they’re protein-filled
and the fish seem thrilled
when presented
nutritious
fish-hook
worms.

© Lawrencealot – February 4, 2015

Mini-monoverse

The Mini-monoverse is a poetry form originated by Emily Romano. Each Mini-monoverse is made up of two stanzas of five three-syllable lines. They rhyme scheme is a/a/a/a/a for the first stanza and b/b/b/b/b for the second stanza. For a double Mini-monoverse just add two more stanzas. They rhyme scheme for the third stanza should be c/c/c/c/c and for the fourth stanza, d/d/d/d/d. It is desirable that the Mini-monoverse tell a story, but this is not a hard and fast rule.

How Many Times?

Thunderbolt!
Foolish dolt,
On a colt,
Feels the jolt
Of a volt.

Aftermath:
Venting wrath
In the bath,
Second swath!
Do the math.

Copyright © 2007 Emily Romano

Airborne

Cattail fluff
Velvet stuff
Colored buff
Watch it luff
Toward the bluff.

A light breeze
will appease,
lightly tease,
lift with ease
seeds like these.

Copyright © 2007 Margaret R. Smith

Pasted from http://www.shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/minimonoverse.html
Many thanks to the ShadowPoetry site.

My example

Ego-lust

It’s a cinch
Marshawn Lynch
shrunk an inch.
His crotch pinch
made me flinch.

Gone awry
a black eye
will apply.
A sad guy,
don’t know why.

© Lawrencealot – Dec 29, 2014

Visual template

Mini-Monoverse

Copla Real

Copla Real, popular in 15th century Spain, is a decastich which is made up of 2 Quintillas.

The Copla Real is:
○ a decastich (10 line poem) made up of 2 Quintillas (Spanish 8 syllable line quintains turned on only 2 rhymes of any combination other than never ending with a rhymed couplet.)
○ syllabic, all lines are 8 syllables.
○ rhymed, the rhyme scheme established in the first quintain is repeated in the 2nd quintilla. Possible rhyme schemes ababa, abbab, abaab, aabab, or aabba. The one no-no is it should never end in a rhyming couplet.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/1031-copla-copla-real-pie-quebrado/
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

To Pee or Not to Pee (Form: Copla Real)

I put my first foot on the floor
then know I want to sleep some more.
It’s early yet; there’s snow outside
Get up? Stay here? It’s either/or.
My need to pee might soon subside.

The trip to pee I do abhor;
to go and pee’s no little chore.
You think I’m silly? Don’t be snide.
I’d have to open our backdoor.
Your own bathroom must be inside.

© Lawrencealot – December 22, 2014

Visual template
This template is for iambic tetrameter.

Copla Real

Zeno

I’m on a JPat roll at the moment, happy to share news of another contribution of J. Patrick Lewis. He has invented a new poetic form, the zeno! Tricia scooped the news at The Miss Rumphius Effect earlier this week, but I think it bears repeating. I know teachers enjoy introducing the form of poetry to kids, as they model for children the different ways a poem can look and sound. And kids often enjoy this aspect of poetry too—approaching it as a puzzle to solve and understand. And I know poets themselves approach the form and structure of poetry with great intentionality and I’m always curious about why a certain choice is made. Well… drum roll… you can see Pat’s past as a professor of economics in the roots of his new poem form, the zeno. He describes it so: 

“I’ve never invented a new verse form… until now… It was inspired by the mathematical “hailstone sequence,” simply explained here…. I call the form a “zeno,” so named for Zeno, the philosopher of paradoxes,especially the dichotomy paradox, according to which getting anywhere involves first getting half way there and then again halfway there, and so on ad infinitum. I’m dividing each line in half of the previous one. Here’s my definition of a zeno: A 10-line verse form with a repeating syllable count of 8,4,2,1,4,2,1,4,2,1. The rhyme scheme is abcdefdghd. Naturally, I don’t expect it to displace the sestina, villanelle, triolet, et al. But it would be grand if they all moved over one seat and made room for it.”

Here are a few examples to illustrate the form:

Nature’s Art Gallery 
By J. Patrick Lewis 

Wind’s paintbrush strokes in streaks the trees,
a miracle,
ages
old,
it knows without
being
told—
Novembering
maples
gold.

Traveling by Armchair
By J. Patrick Lewis

You can take a trip by Greyhound,
motorcycle,
paddle-
wheel,
ocean liner
(package
deal)—
I prefer a
bookmo-
bile.

Pasted from http://poetryforchildren.blogspot.com/2009/10/birth-of-zeno.html
Thanks to POETRYFORCHILDREN.BLOGSPOT for bring this to my attention.

Specifications restated:
Zeno is named after a pre-Socratic philosopher of paradoxes.

Zeno is:
a poem of 1o lines invented by J. Patrick Lewis,
syllabic: 8/4/2/1/4/2/1/4/2/1
Rhyme scheme: abcdefdghd

.

 

My example

Any Chore (Zeno)

The first half is the biggest chunk
of any job
you do.
You
can prevail if
you know
that
you’re already
half-way
through.

© Lawrencealot – November 1, 2014

Pirouette

• The Pirouette is an invented verse form with very little detail provided.
The Pirouette is:
○ a decastich, a poem in 10 lines.
○ syllabic, 6 syllable per line.
○ L5 is repeated in L6.
○ rhymed or unrhymed at the discretion of the poet.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/2192-invented-forms-from-poetry-styles/
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

Pirouette
 10 line free verse   Each line contains 6 syllables Line 5 and 6 are identical
Line 5 ends first half   Line 6 starts second   Both halves different

Pasted from http://the.a.b.c.of.poetry.styles.patthepoet.com/OtoS.html
Many Thanks to Christina R Jussaume for her work on the Poetry Styles site.

Well, after scouring the internet, I found conflicting information on whether to poem could rhyme or not, and only free verse examples. SO, I am going to opt for Judi Van Gorder’s take, and pen a rhymed version as I have found her research most frequently correct in the past.

My example

Reno, Santa Crawl

The Santa Crawl (Pirouette)

Tying one on last night
wobbling from bar to bar,
each dressed up like Santa,
none allowed in a car.
It made downtown a sight.

It made downtown a sight.
Santa was everywhere;
It’s worth the trip downtown.
Each tavern gets its share.
A grown-up kid’s delight.

© Lawrencealot – October 25, 2014

 

Photo Credit, and info on this annual Reno Event

http://www.visitrenotahoe.com/reno-tahoe/what-to-do/events/special-events/12-13-2014/reno-santa-pub-crawl

 

 

Double Five

Type:  Structure, Other Requirement
Description:  The double five is two quintet stanzas of short lines. It should be done as a portrait of a person (loved one), preferably titled with the individual’s name. This form was referenced in Sol’s Magazine.
Schematic:  Since this is a nonce form other than the number of lines
requirement, a schematic is unavailable.
Rhythm/Stanza Length:  5
Line/Poem Length:  10

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/000/91.shtml
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

I Include this is my list, merely to make the list complete.
Since my normal contribution is to make a visual template available, and such a thing would be meaningless here, I have included no personal example.

Carpe Diem

Carpe Diem
This is a new style created by Pat Simpson Aug 15th 2010
The carpe diem is latin meaning live for the day
So subject must be about anything that makes you happy
The style is a ten line poem with varying syllables on each line
Line 1..8syllables:Line 2..6syllables: Line 3..4syllables:Line 4..2syllables:Line 5..10syllables:
Line 6..2syllables: Line 7..4syllables: Line 8..6syllables:Line 9..8syllables:Line 10..10syllables

Pasted from http://the.a.b.c.of.poetry.styles.patthepoet.com/index.html
Many Thanks to Christina R Jussaume for her work on the Poetry Styles site.

The Carpe Diem is:
A poem of 10 lines.
Syllabic, with lines of 8/6/4/2/10/2/4/6/8/10
No metrical or rhyme requirement.

My Example

‘S Okay (Carpe Diem)

Today has started out okay.
My house did not burn down.
My coffee’s good
and hot.
My dog has gone outside to take a pee.
I don’t
yet think I’m nuts,
and don’t suppose I would
as long as my reality
is not at odds with simply feeling good.

© Lawrencealot – October 7, 2014

 

Visual Template
Note: no specific meter is mandated.

Carpe Diem

Brady’s Touch

Brady’s Touch
A two-stanza poem with a strict syllable count of 9, 9, 8, 8, 2; 9, 9, 8, 8, 2: the rhyme scheme is abcde;abfde. You may change the rhyme sounds (although not the scheme) for the second stanza.
*Note:This reader has no idea what the previous sentence means. – Lawrencealot
This style was created by Maryann Merryweather-Travis, in November of 2006, to honor Allen Brady.

 

Sepecifications restated.
Brady’s Touch is:
Stanzaic: consisting of two cinquains
Syllabic: Both stanzas having lines of 9/9/8/8/2
Rhyme Scheme: abxcd abxcd, where x is unrhymed.

My example

I Judge They’re Quick to Judge (Brady’s Touch)

Seemingly the speeding days have wrought
a group-thought shift, a transformation
that takes too far the axiom
that “Brevity’s the soul of wit”,
though true.

Early on as it approached, I thought
“This is a dreadful situation;
there’ll be a one-word contest soon.”
…and it came to pass. I’ve seen it!
Did you?

© Lawrencealot – October 6, 2014

 

San Hsien

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• San Hsien (three strings) is another invented verse form in a decastich. It was created by Jessamine Fishback.

The San Hsien is:
○ a decastich, a poem in 10 lines.
○ metric, iambic dimeter. L1 is acephaletic (drops the 1st unstressed syllable).
○ rhyme, rhyme scheme ABbaccabBA.
○ composed with a refrain, L1 & L2 are repeated as L9 & L10 in reverse.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Specificity

Sober Thought (San Hsien)

You are here
the sign proclaimed.
“Where?”, I exclaimed.
“That final beer
was just too much;
you’re out of touch
that much is clear;
aren’t you are shamed?”
The sign proclaimed
You are here.

© Lawrencealot – September 25, 2014

 

Picture Credit:  ea of Allpoetry

Visual Template

San Hsien

Sacred Signia

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.
• The Sacred Signia is an invented verse form is a decastich. Introduced by Viola Berg.

The Sacred Signia is:
○ a decastich, a poem in 10 lines.
○ metric, L1,L3,L5,L7-L10 are iambic pentameter and L2,L4,L6 are iambic dimeter.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme ababcbccaa.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Her Eyes
Her Eyes (Sacred Signia)

Her eyes compel, intrigue, and they entice.
I feel controlled
at ease, yet seeking solace and advice.
I dare be bold,
when lifted by her steady knowing gaze
There is no cold
within those eyes, they’re warm and quite ablaze –
intelligent and able to appraise.
The magic’s broad and strong and yet, concise,
I need no more to know for sure she’s nice.

© Lawrencealot – September 24, 2014

Visual template

Sacred Signia