Blood Quill

The Blood Quill form was invented in 2008 by Jim T. Henriksen writing on Allpoetry.com.

The Blood Quill form has two stanzas, each made of six lines. First and fourth line rhymes, second and fifth line rhymes, and third and sixth line rhymes per stanza. First, second, fourth and fifth line has six syllables, while third and sixth line has nine syllables. Rhyming pattern is abcabc defdef, and rhythm pattern is 669669 669669, or visually:

Blood Quill

Poetic Justice

Poetic Justice

I will tell you a tale
of a powerful guild,
with brave members all over the Horde;
And not once would they fail,
for this group was so skilled,
with a feather they held like a sword.

They fought till the last breath,
whether theirs or their kill,
and the ground trembled hard with a thud;
With their enemies death,
in their heart was a quill,
and a poem was written in blood.

© Jim T. Henriksen. All rights reserved.
January 8th, 2008

Specifications restated:
Stanzaic: Two Sestets
Syllabic: 6/6/9/6/6/9
Rhymed: abcabc defdef
Metric option: Anapestic dimeter and trimeter.

My example

Race Riots

Race Riots (Blood Quill)

In reacting to hate
caused by eras long past
the aggrieved now have earned disrespect.
When they somehow equate
one man’s acting too fast,
just to race, they’re not most circumspect.

In destroying a store
or committing a crime,
their behavior is rising a flood.
All their own ought deplore
men behaving like slime
and then forcing more payment in blood.

© Lawrencealot – December 8, 2014

Mystic Butterfly

Mystic Butterfly form is one created by two poetesses
and combines their pen names of Mystictaurusritr and DarkButterfly.
The form is intricate in style and utilizes both of their own styles
as well as incorporating extended echos of Edgar Allan Poe.
Their form is penned as follows:
2 Sestets (6 lines per stanza)
Each line starts with a capital letter.
Rhyme scheme:  abcddd
Internal and External rhyme using the same pattern, on every line.
Line 6 is your refrain, which the first word may be altered
if needed to fit stanza better. Syllable pattern as follows:
L1 ~ 16 syllables
L2 ~ 18 syllables
L3 ~ 16 syllables
L4 & L5 ~ 15 syllables (L5 ends with end word of L4)
L6 ~ 7 syllables
Example Poem
A Night Out with a Role Playing Mistress      (Mystic Butterfly)

I followed her into the park across the street and in the dark.
Her coat hid her skimpy and bold clothes that exposed much to view, more to cold.
She’d turned him down with much disdain, and picked another just as plain,
He, had no doubt, much money spent; back downstairs he looked content.
She’d  struck out  with a spiffy gent, who left clearly not content.
Evil doers must repent.

As she approached the wooded dark, cutting through the secluded park.
Death was gaining through the dim cold.  This attack would be quick evil and bold.
There remained nothing to explain. The whore simply must feel the pain.
He pulled her from the hard cement, promised loud he would torment.
Before he could my knife’s descent cut his throat without torment.
Evil doers must repent.

© Lawrencealot – October 28, 2013
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Hex Sonnetta

The HexSonnetta, created by Andrea Dietrich, consists of two six-line stanzas and a finishing rhyming
couplet with the following set of rules:
Meter: Iambic Trimeter
Rhyme Scheme:  abbaab cddccd ee  (abbabbcddccdee)
Iambic Trimeter means the usual iambic (alternating unstressed/stressed)  meter for every line of the poem, but instead of the ten syllables that comprise a typical sonnet’s iambic pentameter, this particular form uses
six syllables of iambic trimeter per line.
Thus, the name HexSonnetta.
The first part of the form’s name refers to the syllable count per line.
The second part of the name, Sonnetta, is to show this to be a form similar to the sonnet, yet with its shorter lines and different rhyme scheme, it is not the typical sonnet. Not only does this poem have six syllables per line, it also has a set of two six-line stanzas, giving an extra “hex” to the meaning of HexSonnetta.
The rhyme scheme is a bit of a mixture of the two traditional sonnet types, with the two 6-line stanzas having more the rhyme scheme of an Italian sonnet, but with the ending rhyming couplet being the featured rhyme scheme of the English sonnet. The first stanza presents the theme of the poem, with the second stanza serving to change the tone of the poem, to introduce a new aspect of the theme or to give added details.
The final couplet, as in an English sonnet, can be either a summary (if the theme is simple) or it could be the resolution to a problem presented in the theme. In any event, it should nicely tie together the whole piece and could even appear as a nice “twist” presented at the end.
Example Poem
Gam-boy No Batteries
The tramp stamp tattoo’s swell
but now it is passé.
This tat’s for every day.
It’s sure to cast a spell
and start-up jitters, quell.
Just need a pen to play.
You verbal skills may suck.
You may be shy to boot.
The guys will closer scoot.
Keep in your car or truck
a pen for your own luck.
and playing is a hoot!
Put one upon your thighs.
for really studly guys.
© Lawrencealot – May 22, 2012
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Staccato

The Staccato, created by Jan Turner, consists of two or more 6-line stanzas.
 
Rhyme scheme: aabbcc.
*Required internal rhyme scheme interplay between line #1 and line #2 (see below explanation and examples).
 
Meter:  10/10/8/8/10/10
 
Repeats: This form requires a 2-syllable repeat in Lines #3 and #6 as specified below.
 
As in a musical notation, The Staccato poetry form uses
short repeats which are abruptly disconnected
elements. The repeat words are read as rapid-fire speech,
such as staccato music when played or sung.
This form lends itself to strong emotion or instruction
(i.e. military poems: “Charge on! Charge on!” etc.),
a declaration (such as of an event: “We’re married!
We’re married!” etc.), an instruction or emphasis of
human emotion (such as love, hate, longing: “Be mine!
Be mine!” etc.), strong observation (such as
“Those eyes! Those eyes!” etc.) or any similar
situation where a strong staccato repeat is desired.
 
The emphatic two-syllable repeat in this poetry form
is written twice, consecutively, at the beginning of
Line #3 (each repeat in Line #3 is followed by an exclamation mark),
 and once again at the beginning of Line #6
(with or without an exclamation mark in Line #6).
 
Also, Line #2 requires an internal rhyme scheme that rhymes
with a word within Line #1, usually falling on
the 6th syllable (see examples below), but can fall earlier
in those two lines as long as the internal rhyme
matches the syllabic stress in both lines .
 
Example Poem
 
Let’s Write a Staccato
 
A staccato let’s write, right here and now.
It’s simple, really quite forward, here’s how.
Notice! Notice! Internal rhyme
in lines one and two just in time
for a repeated exclamation, yet
notice third repeat may in quiet set.
 
That inversion my dear, was just for show
to make the rhyme quite clear of course you know.
I know! I know! Poor form to teach
Is most certainly a bad breach.
Since this poem with that err I fetter
I know you, my readers, can do better.
 
(c) Lawrencealot – September 11, 2012
 
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