Puente

“Puente” means bridge in Spanish. This form was invented by James Rasmusson.
Constructed in 3 stanzas, the 1st and 3rd are separate thoughts but share an equal number of lines and the center, bridge stanza. The middle stanza is one line and is enclosed in tildes (~) to distinguish itself as both the last line of the first stanza and the first line of the last stanza.
The meter and rhyming are at the poet’s discretion, free verse being perfectly acceptable. The title is has no guidelines; it need not match the bridge stanza like the example below.
 
Example Poem 

Opportunity Knocks 

A new form came upon the scene
and sep’rate topics are required
with bridging line in between
as linked by poet, so inspired. 

~ it’s both a test and opportunity~ 

Another contest has appeared
it features something yet untried
but that is nothing to be feared;
try it, you’ll be satisfied.

© Lawrencealot – May 31, 2013 

Piaku

The Piaku form takes part of its name from the fact that the syllable count for each line matches the digits in Pi.

Form Type: Syllabic
Origins: American
Creator: Mike Rollins
Number of Lines: Unlimited
Rhyme Scheme: Not Applicable
Meter: Not applicable

Pasted from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pi>

Rules
1. Each line must be the same syllable length as the digit in that location in the PI sequence.

2. Poems may be of any length.

Pi:  3.14159 26535 89793

Examples
The Storm

Flash, Rumble
Rain
Awesome thunder
Wind
The wind will plunder
As did the pirates from on yonder
Raid, fall
Damn! My ship is sinking
The water stinging
Quivering
The storm moves onward
I’m tired, I’m cold, I sink, I die.

Mike Rollins

The Rain

I say old
man ,
listen to that
wind.
Walking is no fun
on a night when horizontal rains
transpire.
Scurry to the back yard
hurry quick then lie
by the fire.

(c) Lawrencealot – January 22, 2013

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