Englyn Milwr

The traditional Welsh form Englyn Milwr (soldier’s englyn):  three 7-syllable lines rimed on the last syllable.  (Englynion are short epigrammatic verses.)  Further, it has the Cynghanedd required of a Welsh bard, in this case Cynghanedd Groes (cross consonance), where the second part of the line repeats the sequence of consonant sounds in the first part (n can be ignored, as can the sounds at the end of the last syllable of either part, while w and y are treated as vowels).

Eyes ask sweetly; nose seeks tail;
she purrs soft, a show:  prize sale!
With man so fooled, the mice flail.

Example Poem

Obama Care

O-care cuts the doctors’ pay,
deigns to proscribe doctors’ play.
Mine says “Why?”, and moves away.

© Lawrencealot – Edited December 10,2012

 

Related Welsh Form are HERE.

Visual Template
syllabic: 7/7/7
rhymed: aaa

Haiku

HAIKU is both singular and plural.

A Japanese form designed to be small and concise by limiting the number of lines and the number of syllables in a line. Japanese haiku are three-line poems with the first and the third line having five syllables and the middle having seven syllables. English-language Haiku may be shorter than seventeen syllables, though some poets prefer to keep to the 5-7-5 format.

A true is much more than a poem is 5-7-5 format.

• Use concise, simple and clear language
• Write in two sections, using a fragment and a phrase
• Use sense images, in particular what you see or hear
• Write in the present tense
• Compare or contrast two different images as juxtapositions
• Try to include a seasonal reference
• Write in 17 syllables or less, preferably between 8-12
• Use minimal (if any) punctuation
• Try to make your haiku open-ended and evocative
• Try not make judgments or express your opinions
• Limit your use of adjectives and try not to use adverbs
• Do not use rhyme, simile, metaphor or personification
• There is no need for capital letters, except for proper nouns

And there are many Haiku knock-offs:

Example Poems

voluptuous wife approaches –
low-cut gown
perfume excites

dog on lap
puppy barks –
two dogs on lap

(c) Lawrencealot –

SIJO

SIJO  (from Shadow Poetry Handbook)
A short Korean poetry form consisting of three lines,
each line having a total of 14-16 syllables in four groups
ranging from 2 to 7 (but usually 3 or 4) syllables, with a natural pause at the end of the second group and a major pause after the fourth group.

The third line often introduces a resolution, a touch of humor, or a turn of thought.

Nature is often the subject matter of these poems like traditional haiku.”

Either narrative or thematic,
this lyric verse introduces a truth (perhaps a problem) in line 1,
development (called a turn) in line 2,
and a strong conclusion beginning with a surprise (a twist) in line 3,
which resolves tensions or questions raised by the other lines
and provides a memorable ending.

 

Example Poem

Surprise Test

Trained by nature over time, learned and changed my DNA.
Teacher springs surprise exam; tough, could be season ending.
Snow bonnet fends off freezing adds resilience to my beauty.
 (C) Lawrencealot – July 23, 2012
Visual Template

Triquain

Triquain…created by Shelley Cephas,
A Triquain is a seven line poem with syllables in multiples of 3 as follows:
3, 6, 9, 12, 9, 6, 3 This form is always centered.
syllabic,3/6/9/12/9/6/3,unrhymed,7 lines
ALWAYS Centered
 
 
Example Poem:
 

Interim Heaven  (Triquain chain – Cephas) 

 
The puppy
brought to the hospital
where the boy was dying adopted
him on first sight.  The lad’s pain was subdued by drugs.
Nothing could subdue the instant joy
filling him as he hugged
The puppy.
 
The cancer
would not relent, and yet
the boy’s eyes were brighter than before
and he never cried another day.  The puppy
snuggled when he slept and licked his face;
played gently other times
with the boy.
 
When the boy
passed on while he slept, the
puppy knew and whined, parents wept.  In
tears a younger brother took the pup, who shut up
and licked away that boy’s tears.  Wiping
grief away, replacing
it with love.
 
(c) Lawrencealot – May 7,2012
 
 
Visual Template:

As it happened, the Triquain above was the first one that I encountered.
It was not however, the first form given the name.

• The Triquain, found in Berg’s Pathways for the Poet 1977 appears to be an attempt at combining the haiku and Crapsey cinquain. It was created by L. Stanley Cheney and referred to in both the Caulkins’ Handbook and Pathways. This form comes a little closer to the purpose of haiku than some other haiku wannabees. There is another invented form also called a Triquain that appeared on the internet about 25 years later written in a syllabic heptastich.

The Triquain is:
○ a tristich, a poem in 3 lines. It is composed in 3 units, L1 introduces the subject, L2 expands and leads into action, L3 is the enlightenment or question.
○ syllabic, with 2-7-7 syllable count per line.
○ Titled, unlike the haiku.

stud by Judi Van Gorder

newborn
leggy colt struggles to stand
first of many challenges

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1188#triquain
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Inquiry (Triquan-Cheney)

questions
preceding words, as babble
most unanswered before death

(c) Lawrencealot – October 29, 2014