Ripple

This is a form created by Larry Eberhart,  aka Lawrencealot on Allpoetry.

It is similar to the Monometric form but with the additional constraint of
line-length in feet being required to match the stanza line count.

The form may be written in three modes:
First as an Augmented Ripple, were the first stanza is two lines, with each additional stanza adding one line.
Next, as a Dimishished Ripple where the first stanza contains the maximum number of lines, with each following stanza having one less, until the two line stanza concludes.

Finally the Reversing Rippled which  can begin as either of the above, and then upon reaching its normal conclusion point reverse the process until it concludes with a stanza the length of the beginning stanza.  The turning stanza is not repeated.

All stanzas are mono-rhyme, or all are blank verse.

Example Poem

[Is Coco Nuts?]    (Ripple-Reversing)

Is Coco nuts
or just a klutz?

She’s always out of breath.
All things are life or death.
I think she’s hooked on meth.

She writes graffiti on the wall
and runs half-naked through the hall
but she’s so nice to one and all
so every night a boy will call.

Each guy gets just one turn
no matter how they yearn.
Her own desire’s to learn.

I would replay
my single day.

© Lawrencealot – February 16, 2013

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Monometric

The Monometric Form was
Invented by  Walter E. Ferguson III, aka Thunder_Speech on Allpoetry

The form can be manifest in three modes:
The norm is Augmented Monometric, illustrated below by that author’s poem.

This form requires the poet to begin with a couplet, then augment
each succeeding stanza with one more line.

Each stanza is to be independent mono-rhyme.

Lines can be of any constant meter, e.g.,
Iambic trimeter, Iambic tetrameter, Iambic pentameter, etc..or
Trochaic tetramter, trochaic pentameter, etc., or
Amphibrach Dimeter, amphibrach Trimeter, etc..
To summarize, the poet may choose ANY consistent meter and feet, and
then apply mono-rhyme to increasing length stanzas.

If the poet chooses to start with his maximum stanza length and subtract one line
each stanza, ending with a couplet, it is then called a Diminished Monometric.

Clearly an enterprising poet could append each type and have a Reversing Monometric.

Example Poem

Routine   (Reversing Monometric)

Joe digs the hole each day.
It’s always been that way.

I stick the bloody pole
into the bloomin’ hole
That’s always been my role.

The hole’s then filled by Ned.
while Joe goes on ahead.
I fetch poles from the shed,
so nothing need be said.

Well I was sick one day.
Work went on anyway.
They knew their jobs okay.
They did them the same way.

Joe dug; Ned filled the hole.
They both knew their own role
but didn’t know the goal.

It’s OK, now I’m back.
We’ll get the fence on track.

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