Loonies

Loonies: Five lines. Syllable Count or Word Count:
1-5-5-1-1 hyphenated word-1 hyphenated word

Contemplating Angels
Angels
carry our imaginations and hopes.
Metaphors for good or bad
rainbow-winged
halo-hoopers.

http://www.rainbowcommunications.org/velvet/forms/
My Thanks to Linda Varsell Smith for her contributions above.

Specifications re-stated:
A 5 line, 13 word poem.
It is word-based with 1/5/5/1/1 words per line.
It is formulaic: the words in the final two lines must be hyphenated.
There are no metric or rhyming requirements.

My example

Semi-retirement (Form: Loonies)

I’m
tired of working every day
and aiming to become a
full-time
part-timer.

© Lawrencealot – December 28, 2014

Cinquo

• The Cinquo is a half Crapsey Cinquain.

The Cinquo is:
○ a pentastich, a poem in 5 lines.
○ syllabic, 1-2-3-4-1 syllables per line.
○ unrhymed. 

Favored by jvg
pear
apple
banana
watermelon
grapes

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2008#cinquo
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Short

Short?
Heck yes.
Toward what end?
Brevity I guess.
Yep!

© Lawrencealot – November 22, 2014

Cinqku

The “cinqku” is a new Tanka analogue; a seventeen syllable cinquain that assimilates as much as possible from the Japanese haiku and Tanka traditions into the English poetic tradition.

Form Type: Syllabic
Origins: American
Creator: Denis M. Garrison
Number of Lines: 5
Rhyme Scheme: Not Applicable
Meter: Not applicable

Rules
1. A strict syllable count (2,3,4,6,2) making 17 syllables on 5 lines

2. No title

3. Tanka style free diction and syntax

4. No metrical requirement

5. A turn that may be similar to kireji or a cinquain turn.

Cinqku’s can be linked. A linked sequence may have a title.

Examples

buried
five cold years
but never gone – 
our bedroom’s fragrant with
her scent

Denis M. Garrison

Notes
A primary concern for the cinqku is the effective use of the line break.

Pasted from http://bensonofjohn.co.uk/poetry/formssearch.php?searchbox=Cinqku

My example

fires burn
far away
unseen ashes –
are felt and smelled upon
the wind

© Lawrencealot – October 7, 2014

Trillium

Pathways for the Poet by  Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source… Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Trillium is an invented verse form, a pentastich with long and short lines.

The Trillium is:
○ a pentastich, a poem in 5 lines.
○ metric, iambic, L1 & L5 are trimeter and L2 – L4 are catalectic, hexameter.
○ rhymed, abbba.
○ because L2-L4 are catalectic they will have feminine endings.
xx xx xa
xx xx xx xx xx b
xx xx xx xx xx xb
xx xx xx xx xx b 
xx xx xa

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

21st Century Schooling (Trillium)

To teach to youth I know
it helps to present single facts as lyrics
and not as theories, notions esoteric,
avoiding nuances, and themes satiric.
Indoctrinate them though.

© Lawrencealot – September 28, 2014

Visual template

Trillium

Quintanelle

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Quintanelle challenges the poet to write a complete sentence and break it into 5 metric lines with rhyme. This stanzaic form was introduced by Lyra Lu Vaile.

The Quintanelle is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quintains.
○ metered, L1, L2, L5 pentameter, L3 dimeter and L4 trimeter. Each quintain should be one complete iambic sentence.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme aabbb, ccddd etc.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Winter Forage (Quintanelle)

I’ve left the apples where they’ve fallen, still; 
it’s natures harvest for the birds that will
not let them waste,
although there is no haste
for they’ll remain when fresh food is displaced.

© Lawrencealot – September 20, 2012

Visual template

Quintanelle

Waka

Waka
Type: Structure, Metrical Requirement, Other Requirement
Description: Quintet in syllables 5-7-5-7-7. The first two lines treat one subject, the second two treat another, and the last line is a refrain or paraphrase. The first two lines are a dependent clause, while the last three are independent.
Origin: Japanese
Schematic:
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxxxx
Rhythm/Stanza Length: 5

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/003/332.shtml
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

_____

Researching, I found: that this is a general and ancient classification of Japanese poetry, where Wa means Japanese and Ka means poem. It differentiated poetry writing in their own language from that written in Chinese, which was the more formal method.

All of the following are then examples of Waka. But I shall persist
and write one specifically to the form indicated by Mr. Weatherford.

_____

Name                     Form                 Note
Katauta                 5-7-7                 One half of an exchange of two poemThas; the shortest type of waka
Chōka                    5-7-5-7-5-7…5-7-7
Repetition of 5 and 7 on phrases, with a last phrase containing 7 on.
Mainly composed to commemorate public events, and often followed by ahanka or envoi.
Numerous chōka appear prominently in the Man’yōshū, but only 5 in the Kokinshū.

Tanka                  5-7-5-7-7         The most widely-composed type of waka throughout history
Sedōka                 5-7-7-5-7-7     Composed of two sets of 5-7-7 (similar to two katauta).
Frequently in the form of mondōka (問答歌 “dialogue poem”?)

_____
or an exchange between lovers
Bussokusekika  5-7-5-7-7-7       A tanka with an extra phrase of 7 on added to the end

Pasted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waka_(poetry)

_____

Co-dependent? (Waka)

Men of power use
young women as their just due.
Groupies seek the light.
They will comply completely.
They’re quid quo pro dependent.

© Lawrencealot – August 30, 2014

Mad Song Stanza

Mad Song Stanza
Type: Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Other Requirement, Stanzaic
Description: Five line form with 3 feet, 3, 2, 2, 3, usually iambic and rhyme Xabba, often of a non-linear nature.
Origin: English
Schematic:
xX xX xX
xX xX xA
xX xB
xX xB
xX xX xA
Rhythm/Stanza Length: 5
Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/001/176.shtml

My Thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for the fine Poetrybase resource.

Restated Specifications: The Mad Song Stanza is:
Stanzaic: One or more quintains
Syllabic: 6/6/4/4/6
Rhymed: xabba
Metric: Iambic
Poem length: 5 lines or multiple.

My Example poem

Post-Haste ( Mad Song Stanza)

A lim’rick takes too long
and I’ve no time to waste.
This form seems fast,
and not half-assed
and can be done post-haste.

© Lawencealot- July 22, 2014
Visual Template

Mad Song Stanza

Marianne

  • The Marianne is a verse form that is written with a combination rhyme and syllable count. It was created by Viola Berg . The lines should be centered on the page.The Marianne is:
    • a pentastich, a poem in 5 lines.
    • syllabic, 4/6/8/4/2 syllables per line.
    • rhymed, axaxa x being unrhymed.
    • titled and centered on the page.
My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO
My Example
A Centered Pentastitch (Marianne)
I don’t know why
Viola invented
this form. There’s not much to apply.
But, being me,
I’ll try.
© Lawrencealot – March 31, 2014

Bina

Bina
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, End Word Requirement, Isosyllabic
Description:
Bob Newman has taken the general idea of the sestina and extended it both upwards and downwards from the six-line stanza it normally uses. The Bina is the two-line stanza version. Like the sestina, it is preferable to use isosyllabic lines.
Attributed to:
Bob Newman
Origin:
England
Schematic:
End word repetition pattern:
12
21
Envoy: (12)
Strengths:
It is much shorter and more practical that the sestina.
Weaknesses:
Having shorter stanzas, the end words come back very quickly, so while it isn’t as repetitive and possibly monotonous as the sestina, they will be a very strong presence in the poem. This could make the poem somewhat comic, intentionally or not.
Starting Point:
Because it is only five lines, the flexibility of the end words is not nearly as important as in the sestina; however, they should be chosen well enough that they can be used three times each in five lines and not grate on the nerves.
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
2
Line/Poem Length:
5
Status:
Complete
Bina
An even smaller variation with just 2 keywords and 5 lines is possible; we may as well call this the bina, then we can have:
Wry Bina
When young Michelle was thirsty, she would long
For “that blackcurrant drink – is any left?”
I wonder, now that she’s grown up and left,
If maybe I indulged her for too long.
When in the tooth she’s long, she’ll have none left.
A big thank you to Bob Newman

My Example

Trained Wives     (Bina)

The earning of money has been up to me,

the spending of it’s been up to my wives.

I’ve tried adjusting by taking new wives

but they’ve all done their jobs better than me.

The question for me is who trains those wives?

© Lawrencealot – December 26, 2013

Visual Template

Cinquain

(Standard) Cinquain
The cinquain, also known as a quintain or quintet, is a poem or stanza composed of 5 lines. Examples of cinquains can be found in many European languages, and the origin of the form dates back to medieval French poetry.
The most common cinquains in English follow a rhyme scheme of ababb, abaab or abccb. Sixteenth and seventeenth-century poets such as Sir Philip Sidney, George HerbertEdmund Waller, and John Donne frequently employed the form, creating numerous variations.
Other examples of the form include “To Helen” by Edgar Allen Poe, which begins:
Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore,
That gently, o’er a perfumed sea,
The weary, way-worn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.
A Visual Template:
Rhyme optional with Crapsey cinquain
Crapsey cinquain
American poet Adelaide Crapsey invented the modern form,[2] inspired by Japanese haiku and tanka.[3][4] In her 1915 collection titled Verse, published one year after her death, Crapsey included 28 cinquains.[5]
Crapsey’s cinquains utilized an increasing syllable count in the first four lines, namely two in the first, four in the second, six in the third, and eight in the fourth, before returning to two syllables on the last line. In addition, though little emphasized by critics, each line in the majority of Crapsey cinquains has a fixed number of stressed syllables, as well, following the pattern one, two, three, four, one.[citation needed] The most common metrical foot in her twenty-eight published examples is the iamb, though this is not exclusive. Lines generally do not rhyme. In contrast to the Eastern forms upon which she based them, Crapsey always titled her cinquains, effectively utilizing the title as a sixth line.
The form is illustrated by Crapsey’s “November Night”:[6]
Text
Syllables
Stressed
Listen…
2
1
With faint dry sound,
4
2
Like steps of passing ghosts,
6
3
The leaves, frost-crisp’d, break from the trees
8
4
And fall.
2
1
Variations
The Crapsey cinquain has subsequently seen a number of variations by modern poets, including:
Variation
Description
Reverse cinquain
a form with one 5-line stanza in a syllabic pattern of two, eight, six, four, two.
Mirror cinquain
a form with two 5-line stanzas consisting of a cinquain followed by a reverse cinquain.
Butterfly cinquain
a nine-line syllabic form with the pattern two, four, six, eight, two, eight, six, four, two.
Crown cinquain
a sequence of five cinquain stanzas functioning to construct one larger poem.
Garland cinquain
a series of six cinquains in which the last is formed of lines from the preceding five, typically line one from stanza one, line two from stanza two, and so on.
Another form,  Called a Didactic cinquain, sometimes used by school teachers to teach grammar, is as follows:
Line 1: Noun
Line 2: Description of Noun
Line 3: Action
Line 4: Feeling or Effect
Line 5: Synonym of the initial noun