Compound Word Verse

The Compound Word Verse is a poetry form invented by Margaret R. Smith
that consists of five 3-line stanzas, for a total of 15 lines.
The last line of each stanza ends in a compound word and
these compound words share a common stem word which is taken from the title.
(In the example below the stem word is “snow” from the title “The Unexpected Snow”;
the compound words related
to the title are snowflakes, snowdrifts, snowstorms, etc.)

The Compound Word Verse has a set rhyme scheme and meter as follows:

Rhyme Scheme: aab
Syllabic: 8/8/3
Formulaic

Example Poem

Dancing in the Rain

Choking on dust– driving cattle.
Pushin’ them home’s been a battle.
It’s rainless.

A local  Injun decided
he could help so he provided
a  raindance.

I’ll be home with my gal to night.
So guess what? It’s starting… all right!
Some rainfall.

As I ran from the barn my true
love was running toward me through
a rainstorm.

Dancin’ wet together so free;
each damp and hot… today there’ll be
no raincheck.

© Lawrencealot – April 17, 2012

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