Rannaigecht chethar-chubaid garit rocamarcach

Rannaicheacht, randaigecht chethar-chubaid garit rocamarcach is:
• a Rannaicheacht (versification) gharid (clipped) with two-syllable end words. (chethar-chubaid)
• written in any number of quatrains.
• syllabic 3-7-7-7..
• alliterated, 2 word alliteration in each line.
• written with aicill rhyme, the end word of L3 internally rhymes with L4.
• written with the defining features of all ancient Celtic forms, cywdydd and dunadh.

x (x a)
x x x x x (x a)
x x x x x (x B)
x x bx x (x a)

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1170#chethar
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

Cywdydd = 7 syllable lines, couplets ending alternatively stressed and unstressed
Dunadh = Ending as it start

My example

Fashion (Randaigecht chethar-chubaid garit rocamarcach)

Pray perceive
clothing’s cultural I believe.
Sometimes nothing beats something
is a thing that you’ll perceive.

© Lawrencealot – January 9, 2015

Visual template

Randaigecht chethar-chubaid garit rocamarcach

Quintilla

The Quintilla is a 16th century Spanish quintain with a rhyme scheme that is more about what cannot be done than what can be done. 

The Quintilla is:
• syllabic verse, octasyllabic (8 syllable lines)
• stanzaic, written in any number of quintains (5 line stanzas).
• rhymed. In each quintain only 2 rhymes can be used and it cannot end in a rhyming couplet.
• There is choice of rhyme schemes of ababa, abbab, abaab, aabab, or aabba
• when written as a decastich, (2 quintillas) the verse is known as Copla Real

El Viejo by Judi Van Gorder 7/1/03

The ancient cur begins to rise 
ignoring stiff, defiant bones. 
Foolishly focused on the prize, 
his awkward pounce elicits groans. 
To snub one’s age, not always wise.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1015
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

I’m Shocked, I Did It!  (Form: Quintilla)

Impossibly demanding task
when twenty-two whole words are asked
and forty syllables I need
according to Quintilla’s mask
but perseverance did succeed.

© Lawrencealot – January 9, 2015

Visual template

Quintilla

Copla Real

Copla Real, popular in 15th century Spain, is a decastich which is made up of 2 Quintillas.

The Copla Real is:
○ a decastich (10 line poem) made up of 2 Quintillas (Spanish 8 syllable line quintains turned on only 2 rhymes of any combination other than never ending with a rhymed couplet.)
○ syllabic, all lines are 8 syllables.
○ rhymed, the rhyme scheme established in the first quintain is repeated in the 2nd quintilla. Possible rhyme schemes ababa, abbab, abaab, aabab, or aabba. The one no-no is it should never end in a rhyming couplet.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/1031-copla-copla-real-pie-quebrado/
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

To Pee or Not to Pee (Form: Copla Real)

I put my first foot on the floor
then know I want to sleep some more.
It’s early yet; there’s snow outside
Get up? Stay here? It’s either/or.
My need to pee might soon subside.

The trip to pee I do abhor;
to go and pee’s no little chore.
You think I’m silly? Don’t be snide.
I’d have to open our backdoor.
Your own bathroom must be inside.

© Lawrencealot – December 22, 2014

Visual template
This template is for iambic tetrameter.

Copla Real

Englyn cyrch

Englyn cyrch, én-glin circh (two rhyme englyn), the 5th codified Official Welsh Meter, an Englyn is verse that employs cyrch which means internal rhyme.

 

The defining features of the Englyn cyrch are:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains made up of 2 Cywydd couplets,
    the Cywydd deuair hirion[1] and Awdl gywydd [2].

  • syllablic, 7 syllable lines.

  • rhymed, AaBA with the end syllable of L3 rhymed somewhere in the first half of L4.

     

x x x x x x A (stressed last syllable)

x x x x x X a (unstressed last syllable)

x x x x x x B

x x B x x x A ( B ) can be in the 2nd 3rd or 4th syllables

el y cuddia’r llwyni gleision

ddolennog grwydriad Cynon

dymunwn innau lechu’r ferch

enynnodd serch fy nghalon

Fall by Judi Van Gorder

The wild wind and rain suppress
the dancing leaves in darkness,
telling time to disappear
while they clear away excess.

The Saguaro Cactus by Stephen Arndt 

Curses on the god of sun, 
His burn a crime like arson! 
Yet you battle him till night 
And fight until you have won. 

Curses on the gods of wind, 
Whose force is unimagined! 
When they bluster through your place, 
You face the attack, thick-skinned. 

Curse the gods of sand and dust, 
Who storm when winds wail loudest! 
Let them cloud the air and vaunt, 
Undaunted, you stand robust. 

Ball your fists to curse and cuss, 
Strong-armed Saguaro Cactus! 
Rail against the desert sky, 
Defy it for all of us!

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=983
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

[1] The Cywydd deuair hirion is: Wrenched Rhyme.
[2] Awdl gywydd is: internal rhyme with prior end-rhyme
Mid-line rhymes a and c can be various forms of rhyme but the end of line rhyme b should be perfect rhyme.

 

My example

Dragon’s Fire (Englyn cyrch)

Sean had a long scaly tail
he flew but left no contrail.
He feared not what warrior’s felt;
he’d just melt down their chain mail.

Cutie Pie teased a young Sean
often with flirty Come-on.
Sean (a dragon by the way)
came to play – the lady’s gone.

© Lawrencealot – December 9, 2014

 

Related Welsh Form are HERE.

Visual template

Englyn cyrch

Streambed Quintet poetry form

This is a form invented by Lillibet Waters, aka Streambed on Allpoetry.

 It is Stanzaic, consisting of two or more quintets.
Each stanza is syllabic 7/4/5/3/5
Rhyme pattern: aabba

Example Poem

 Advice to a Freshman     (Streambed Quintet)

 If you come upon a maid
who’s unafraid
and has a yearning
for learning,
please don’t act too staid. 

If perfume arouses you,
and bodice view
portends a measure
of pleasure
it just could be true.

 

If she pulls you close to kiss
don’t be remiss,
she’s not awaiting
dull dating,
act, don’t reminisce.

© Lawrencealot – March 28, 2014

Visual Template

Florette

The Florette, created by Jan Turner, consists of two or more stanzas for either of the two versions.
Version 1 – Quatrain Stanazas
Rhyme schemeaaba , with interlaced rhyme in line four, where syllable eight shares the “b” rhyme.
 Syllabic:           8/8/8/12 
Meter:               Iambic
Version 5 – Quintet Stanazas
Rhyme schemeaabba,  with interlaced rhyme in line five, where syllable eight shares the “b” rhyme.
 Syllabic:             8/8/8/8/12 
Meter:                 Iambic
Sample Poem
Meeting for a Drink     (Florette)While sitting near my fountain, dear
a pretty yellow finch appeared.
When he came by to say hello
it thrilled me much to simply know I wasn’t feared.

He studied me expression wise,
as if the sight was no surprise;
he groomed his feathers, seemed to think,
then bowed to me and took a drink, just we two guys.

© Lawrencealot – November 28, 2013

Visual Template

Clogyrnach

Clogyrnach clog-ír-nach, the 16th codified Welsh meter, an Awdl, is associated with what I can only assume is the name of an ancient poet, Cynddelw and is framed with a cyhydedd fer couplet combined with a longer form. It is rarely used by today’s poets.
The defining features of the Clogymach are:
  • stanzaic, written in any number of quintets, combining a cyhydedd fer *(a rhymed couplet of 8 syllable lines) and a tercet of two 5 syllable lines followed by one 6 syllable line of 2 equal parts, 3 syllables each.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme AABBA. The 1st phrase of L5 rhymes with the previous line and the 2nd phrase rhymes with cyhydedd fer couplet.
  • flexible, L5 of the cinquain can be added to the end of L4 creating a quatrain or can be broken into 2 separate lines creating a sixain.Clog Ear Nach by DC MartinsonInside my head there is a fight
    That leaves me void of sleep at night:
    My ear infected,
    By cure neglected.
    Dejected – Till dawn’s light.
x x x x x x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x x x B
x x x x B
x x B x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x x x B
x x x x B
x x B
x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x x x B
x x x x B x x B x x A
Youth
Smooth lines with the color of peach,
time invites them to dream and reach.
Peer imitates,
lust lures, promise baits,
a world waits, ours to teach.
— Judi Van Gorder
Prism
Within the gemstone, facets glint
like sun on snow with winter’s tint,
sparkling colors fuse
in translucent hues
mark my muse with fired flint.
Judi Van Gorder
Many Thanks to PMO, a fine resource,  for  the above information.
*Technically the cyhydedd fir has internal and linked rhyme so I would simply omit that
designation, with the rhyme schemes shown.

Example Poem

 

Thanksgiving Pies     (Clogyrnach)

Wife’s made more pies than we’ll have guests

Her cooking ranks among the best.

I’m inept – thus banned

can’t cook things not canned,

Works great I must confess.

 

© Lawrencealot – November 27, 2013

Related Welch form at HERE.

Visual Template

Limerick

A limerick (is):
  1. is five lines long,
  2. is based on the rhythm “da-da-DAH” (anapest meter)
  3. has two different rhymes.
  4. Lines 1, 2, and 5 have three of those da-da-DAH “feet,” and rhyme with each other.
  5. Lines 3 and 4 have two, and rhyme with each other.
So the basic form is:
da da DAH / da da DAH / da da BING
da da DAH / da da DAH / da da DING
da da DAH / da da BAM
da da DAH / da da WHAM
da da DAH / da da DAH / da da PING
Limericks can:
  1. drop the first “da” in a line, changing that foot to da-DAH (iamb).
  2. add an extra “da” or two at the end of a line IF it’s used for an extended rhyme, such as people and steeple or cannibal and Hannibal.
  3. use special fonts or characters to make a point,
A Limerick is a rhymed humorous or nonsense poem of five lines which originated in Limerick, Ireland.
The Limerick has a set rhyme scheme of : a-a-b-b-a with a syllable structure of: 9-9-6-6-9.

Limericks can also be written in AMPHIBRACH meter

– two lines of amphibrachic trimeter, two lines of amphibrachic dimeter,

and a final line of amphibrachic trimeter.

Below my visual template shows two perfectly acceptable Limerick Forms.
In the strictest sense limericks should be a single five line poem.  Currently you find many poets stringing them together as stanzas.
Example Poem

The Lady and the Hat

The Lady in the Hat

The lady was well put together
with her tats and hat with a feather
I longed so to treasure
her feminine pleasure
at my place or hers, if she’d rather.

A limerick in amphibrach meter.

With a hat with a feather in place
and a corset constricting her waist
She said, nodding at me
“Take me home if you’re free
I so need a young man to embrace. “

A limerick in anapest meter

(c) Lawrencealot – 2013

_______________________________________________-

For most of three years, that is all I had to say about the subject. During which I a learned a great deal about the permitted mechanics and devices formally allow in writing a poem in a specific meter.
Note: The following explanation is the most correct I have seen, and shows that one FOOT can easily morph into another, because headless feet, and catalectic feet are always s permitted poetic devise which denies counting syllables any validity in defining metrics.

THE STRUCTURE OF A LIMERICK
 
 
Limericks are short poems of five lines having rhyme structure AABBA. It is officially described as a form of ‘anapestic trimeter’.
The ‘anapest’ is a foot of poetic verse consisting of three syllables, the third longer (or accentuated to a greater degree) than the first two: da-da-DA. The word ‘anapest’ shows it’s own metric: anaPEST.
Lines 1, 2 and 5 of a limerick should ideally consist of three anapests each, concluding with an identical or similar phoneme to create the rhyme.
Lines 3 and 4 are shorter, constructed of two anapests each and again rhyming with each other with the overall rhyme structure of AABBA.
 
The anapest metric must show the following pattern:
(da) da DA da da DA da da DA (da) (da)
(da) da DA da da DA da da DA (da) (da)
(da) da DA da da DA (da)
(da) da DA da da DA (da)
(da) da DA da da DA da da DA (da) (da)
Meaning that you can leave off the syllables in parentheses.
But 1, 2 and 5 should match each other, and 3 and 4 should match.

Pasted from
http://whvvugt.home.xs4all.nl/Archives_TCCMB/Limericks/Structure.htmlI

I would love to give attribution, but can do no better than the URL, which belongs to a private domain, but I do thank Andrea Detriech for bringing it to my attention.

But you will note, that by paying attention to these requirements our amphibrach limerick is indeed anapestic as well.

 

Visual Templates

Anapest version

Amphibrach Version

Serenity Refrain

This poetry form was created by SerenityNChains, aka Billie Jean Murchinson.

It is a stanzaic poem, with six 5-line stanzas.
It is syllabic, requiring 7 syllable per line.
Rhyme Scheme: aabba
Refrain: Line 1 slides down another line in each stanza, and then the first stanza is repeated as the closing stanza.
There is no metric requirement other than a comfortable flow with accented rhyme.

Example Poem:

Fallen Friends

Some friends fall by the wayside
not retained ‘cus neither tried.
Other are just yanked away
outside factors having play,
wanted contact is denied.

By where they’re forced to reside
some friends fall by the wayside.
Some take tracks we do not choose,
then both opt, a friend to lose
when friend’s  stance we can’t abide.

A dear few we never lose.
Their advice we always use.
Some friends fall by the wayside.
A fact we just take in stride.
Their influence we excuse.

Friends so close we won’t let go.
We write and call; friendships grow.
Some friends might become our bride.
Some friends fall by the wayside.
Friends we keep make our lives glow.

I still recall that I cried.
when I learned a young friend died.
A treasure I felt I’d lost
when he was chilled by death’s frost.
Some friends fall by the wayside.

Some friends fall by the wayside
not retained ‘cus neither tried.
Other are just yanked away
outside factors having play,
wanted contact is denied.

(c) Lawrencealot – August 16, 2012

Visual Template

Sonnetina Cinque

SONNETINA CINQUE
1. This form comprises of two cinquains.
2. There is no set meter or rhyme scheme, though iambic pentameter or tetrameter is common.
I HAVE SEEN THIS POSTULATED:
iambic tetrameter, rhyme scheme aabba OR abbaa
3. The first cinquain gives a statement or sets up a question.
The second cinquain provides a counterpoint to that statement or answers the question.

Example Poem

Maybe   (Sonnetina Cinque)

A gentleman must always know
A “maybe” spoken by his date
means actions planned “might” have to wait.
While “yes” is clear and signals ” go,
“Maybe” seems meaning “yes,but slow.”

She needs some help and time to think
which will be moot if you inspire
emotionally ignited fire.
A “maybe’s” changed with just a wink
and kisses helped along with drink.

© Lawrencealot – January 6, 2013

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