Bagarthach

Bagarthach verse was hatched in the science fiction novel The Reefs of Earth by American writer R. A Lafferty. In the novel, alien immigrants to earth occasionally speak in verse. They call it Bagarthach Verse and it has powers beyond the words. (Well, doesn’t all good poetry?) In the book, the mean spirited wishes of the verse often come true. The verse is similar to Ruthless Rhyme. In this world written by earthlings, the verse form would be categorized as Light Verse.

The Bagarthach is:
• funny or clever but mean spirited.
• short, one quatrain.
• syllabic 8-9-8-9 syllables per line, sometimes all lines are 8 syllables.
• rhymed abab.
Here is the first Bagarthach verse in Lafferty’s book, spoken during an argument between two aliens.
“I’m turning livid in this bog,
This wooly world that spooks and spites you.
You’ll find that picture’s got a dog!
I hope the blinking bugger bites you!”
So be careful what you write..Consequently the alien to whom the verse is directed is found dead from a dog bite…..
(Yes, I actually bought and read the book for this research.)

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=110
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My Example

Just Standing in Line (Bagarthach)

You had to rush to get ahead
with thirty-four items in your cart.
I hope you feel a sense of dread
while I turn around right here and fart.

© Lawrencealot – November 11, 2014

Pantun

Malaysia is at the most southern tip of Euroasia and is split by the South China Sea. The country borders Thailand, Indonesia and Brunei. The history of poetry in Malaysia goes back to the 14th century and is classified by the language in which it is written, Malay or national poetry, regional (indigenous) poetry and sectional (mostly English or French) poetry. Poetry in Malaysia is highly developed and uses many forms.

• The Pantun was at one time an integral part of Malaysian life, used to propose marriage, to tell a proverb, or to celebrate just about any occasion, even shared between warriors about to battle. I was surprised at how unlike it is from its French variation the Pantoum, which I had previously believed was synonymous with the 15th century Malaysian form. The Pantun is said to go back much further in oral tradition but I could find no agreement on how far or what source, one refers to it as an ancient fishing song. 

The Pantun is a poem of two halves almost unrelated. The first half, the pembayan (shadow) sets the rhythm and rhyme of the whole poem, and the second half, the maksud (meaning) delivers the message. The form has been referred to as a riddle. 

These poems were to be exchanged between individuals, not recited to an audience. 

The Pantun is
○ most often a poem in a single quatrain made up of two complete couplets.
○ syllabic, all lines are of the same length, lines are written in 8 to 12 syllables each.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme abab.
○ written in two complete couplets. The first , the shadow is to set the structure but its focus may be quite different from the second couplet, the meaning in which the message is set.
○ less commonly written in structural variations, still retaining the shadow and meaning components:
§ The shortest is called Pantun Dua Kerat in 2 unrhymed lines.
§ Also written as a sixain made up of 2 tercets, rhyme abcabc.
§ And an octave rhymed abcdabcd.
§ sometimes written in three quatrains rhymed abab abab abab the poem turned on only 2 rhymes.
§ The longest is Pantun Enam Belas Kerat in 16 lines made up of 2 octaves rhyme abcdabcd abcdabcd.
The Choices We Make by Judi Van Gorder

Do I ignore or heed the voices,
the reminder that often festers?
We are all a product of choices, 
our own and our forgotten ancestors. 

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1037
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

OCD? (Pantun)

My wife – the stove, a strong compunction
a life-long habit, I believe.
She checks the stove, its knobs, their function
a second time before we leave.

© Lawrencealot – October 23, 2014

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Pantun

Left-Handed Poems

Left-Handed Poems
Type: Structure, Style, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Other Requirement
Description: A quatrain rhymed abab where the first three lines lead the reader in one direction, then the fourth line shocks by pulling the whole meaning of the poem in a different direction.
Technically, this could be any poem which starts out misleading the reader, but the developer, Johnn Schroeder, tended toward the abab quatrains. It is more of a style than a form in that sense.
Attributed to: Johnn Schroeder
Origin: American
Schematic: abab
Rhythm/Stanza Length: 4
Line/Poem Length:         4

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/001/164.shtml
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

My example

The Daisies Were the Clue

I did not shirk with my home work; my teacher’d made it clear
that in her view I’d better do the work and get on track.
There was enough quality stuff beginning to appear
but then I saw the fatal flaw; it wasn’t my knapsack.

(c) Lawrencealot – October 22, 2014

Tulip

Pathways for the Poet by  Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source… Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Tulip is an invented verse form, a tetrastich with a combination of metric patterns. It was introduced by Viola Gardener.

The Tulip is:
○ a tetrastich, a poem in 4 lines.
○ metric, L1 & L3 are iambic pentameter, L2 i dimeter, a spondee followed by an amphibrach and L4 is dimeter, an iamb followed by an amphibrach.
○ rhymed abab.
○ because of the amphibrach foot at the end of L2 & L4 they have feminine endings.
Starbucks by Judi Van Gorder

The price of java going up and up
Good God! Horrendous!
The cost of coffee is four bucks a cup.
The line, tremendous!

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My Example

Another Birthday (Tulip)

I hope you’re happy, laughing and content.
Hail! Years are mounting.
It’s more important how your day is spent
than annual counting.

© Lawrencealot – September 28, 2014

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Tulip

Lyrell

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Lyrelle is a stanzaic form that seems to be an exercise in metric line length. It was created by Velta Myrtle Allea Sanford. 

The Lyrelle is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
○ metered, iambic. L1 dimeter, L2 trimeter, L3 tetrameter, L4 pentameter.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme abab

Lyrelling by Judi Van Gorder

I’m late again
I am computer bound
the words I write in meter penned,
although in truth I do not like the sound.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

My example

Wizbits (Lyrell)

Go not alone
into a raucous bar.
unless you are a hulk or crone,
or play a really awesome steel guitar.

When posing nude
for fame or just for fun,
remember photos can be skewed
and wide web posts can’t likely be undone.

Do not complain
when you become a joke
who’s viewed by others with disdain
because of Facebook foibles shared with folks.

© Lawrencealot – September, 17 2014

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Lyrell

Serventisio

Serventesio
Type:  Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Stanzaic
Description:  An eight-syllable quatrain rhyming abab. A variant on the redondilla.
Schematic:
Rhyme: abab
Line meter: xxxxxxxx
Rhythm/Stanza Length:  4

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/002/249.shtml

My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

_____

Redondilla Stanza (from redondo meaning round) is one of the most popular Castillian stanzas since the 16th century. It appears to have been the standard for Spanish dramatic dialogue at one time. Apparently experimentation with the form by Ezra Pound brought about a resurgence in popularity in the 20th century. 

The Redondilla is:
• syllabic, usually written in 8 syllable lines. (In Spanish an 8 syllable line can vary to 7 0r 9 syllables depending on the placement of the last accented vowel. In English sources suggests trochaic tetrameter.)
• stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains. This could also be written in verse form, limiting the poem to 16 lines made up of 4 quatrains.
• rhymed, assonant or consonant rhyme. (Remember, consonant rhyme in Spanish prosody refers to full rhyme in English)The most common rhyme scheme abba. No where could I find a change of rhyme, this would suggest the entire poem is limited to 2 rhymes throughout. Luckily assonant rhyme is not true rhyme which could make it easier in English than if you chose “consonant rhyme”. abba abba abba abba etc.
• called the Serventesio when rhyme abab is used.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/1013-redondilla-and-serventesio/

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example poem

Slight Shadows (Serventisio)

Trees provide small shade at night
when the moon is sliver thin.
Shadows fall, obscured from sight
nestled ‘tween the leaves they’re in.

Even stars lend night some light
drifting through the woods again
further filtering it’s right
to dispel the black cat’s grin.

Clouds deny that meager bright
Making graveyard dark begin.
Only feline eyes still might
See enough to find din-din.

© Lawrencealot – August 19, 2014

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Serventisio

 

Droighneach

Droighneach (drá-yi-nah, ‘thorny’) is a traditional Irish quatrain stanza of 9-to-13-syllable lines alternately rimed (abab), always on 3-syllable words, with at least two cross-rimes linking the pair of lines in each half and involving those lines’ end-words, plus alliteration in every line, usually between the end-word and the preceding stressed word—always the case for a quatrain’s last line. Being Irish, it also requires the dunedh, meaning it should end where it began (opening word or phrase or line repeated at the end). It is also described here:

http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/celtic1.html#dro

…and here:

http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1172
My thanks to Gary Kent Spain, aka Venicebard on Allpoetry.
I have copied below both links he provided, unfortunately neither poet was able to follow the first requirement – ending each line with a three-syllable word.
Author Notes accompanying Gary’s Poem below:

My hobby since childhood—never quite grew up! In the 80s, when I was a programmer and had tons of money but no life, I acquired a collection of micro-scale (1/300) WW2 Russian front stuff: once counted just draft horses and had over a thousand, plus several hundred cavalry. Now, of course, no time nor space for them, so the above is all in my mind at the moment.
God’s Paintbrush (Self-Satirical Droighneach)
I’m a military miniature:  commander,
whose panzer division invades a vast library.
No adversary yet:  I’d prefer to philander
but, in all candor, can’t, be’ng lead—quite the contrary!

I’m ten millimeters tall, dark-haired, and handsomely
decked-out in dandy garb, my honor unimpaired.
A fine match! had God not dared, rudely, randomly,
to make me small, handy for his wars, all undeclared.

I see God now, armed with air-brush, advancing
to paint pants with coats field grey, dapper and debonair.
Care He’ll take to touch hands and face with flesh, enhancing
our stance’s appearance, dirt-dappled and doctrinaire.

Shall we commend God’s industry?  Call His quandary
fond, airy prospect of war-games couched on calendar.
His hand arrays us, ready by time’s boundary.
I’m a military miniature:  come and err.
[And, dear jongleur, please pronounce err properly, else all will end up unseemly and up in the ‘air’!]

_________________________

Droighneach (dra’iy-nach) Gaelic, is Oglachas, straying from some of the stringent rules of dán direach yet adding other requirements which make the frame no less difficult. It is sometimes referred to as “the thorny” because of the degree of difficulty in writing this ancient Irish Verse Form that employs cross rhyme and requires 3 syllable end words.

The Droighneach is:
• a loose stanzaic form usually written with any number of octaves but it could be quatrains.
• syllabic with each line with 9 to 13 syllables.
• terminated, written with 3 syllable end words.
• rhymed, with alternating end rhyme abab cdcd etc.
• composed with cross rhyme. There are at least two cross-rhymes in each couplet and alliteration in each line; usually the final word of the line alliterates with the preceding stressed word, this is always true of the last line.
• written with the defining features of most Celtic poems, cywddydd (harmony of sound) and dunadh (beginning and ending the poem with the same word, phrase or line.)

(x x d) b x x x (x x a)
x x x x a x x x (x x b)
x x x x x b (x x a)
x x x x a x x (x x b)
x x x x x d x x (x x c)
x x x c x x x x x x (x x d)
x x d x x x x x x (x x c)
x x x x c x (d x d)

Incomprehensible by Judi Van Gorder
Brutality bursts in the streets of Fallujah,
a plethora of purposeless mutilation,
the execution, a disgrace to Allah,
a disgusting coup d’ etat in jubilation.

Humanity is not served by the criminals,
victim’s funerals expose the amorality.
A pity mankind oft’ acts as cannibals,
animals display less base brutality.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/1172-droighneach/
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on the PMO resource.

____________

Droighneach (dra’iy-nach):
A loose stanza form. Each line can have from nine to thirteen syllables, and it always ends in a trisyllabic word. There is rhyming between lines one and three, two and four, etc. Stanzas can have any number of quatrains. There are at least two cross-rhymes in each couplet and alliteration in each line; usually the final word of the line alliterates with the preceding stressed word, and this is always true of the last line.

x x d b x x x (x x a)
x x x x a x x x (x x b)
x x x x x b (x x a)
x x x x a x x (x x b)
x x x x x d x x (x x c)
x x x c x x x x x x (x x d)
x x d x x x x x x (x x c)
x x x x c x (x x d)

Silken Lady

A silken coat enhances her elegance,
casually clad, but warm and enfolding
her slim limbs in folds of furry fragrance;
green eyes gaze haughtily- a heart beholding.

She licks her lips, a pink tongue seen- disappears;
a lazy yawn, with blinking eyes, amazes,
her devoted audience she domineers.
A soft scream- hairs on end- her purr appraises.
©Leny Roovers 29-10-2004

Pasted from http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/celtic1.html#dro
__________________________________

My example poem

Grandiose (Droighneach)

Contemplate before the jongleurs congregate.
If your work is great, that work they may elevate
some day (some say you’ have to wait and die), consecrate
what they appreciate, and critics nominate.

Given my more likely fate (if you are wondering)
to wander in obscurity (we populate
the wide world, mate) and cause laughs by my blundering.
To be but an underling is hard to contemplate.

© Lawrencealot – August 8, 2014

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Droighneach

The Noyes

• The Noyes is a stanzaic form using uneven short emphatic lines. It is named for English poet Alfred Noyes (1880-1958) patterned after his poem Art. Noyes is better known for The Highwayman.

The Noyes is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
○ metered, L1,L2,L4 are trimeter, L3 is monometer.
abab cdcd efeg ghgh.

Art by Alfred Noyes
I
Yes! Beauty still rebels!
Our dreams like clouds disperse:
She dwells
In agate, marble, verse.

No false constraint be thine!
But, for right walking, choose
The fine,
The strict cothurnus, Muse.

Vainly ye seek to escape
The toil! The yielding phrase
Ye shape
Is clay, not chrysoprase.

And all in vain ye scorn
That seeming ease which ne’er
Was born
Of aught but love and care.

Take up the sculptor’s tool!
Recall the gods that die
To rule
In Parian o’er the sky.

II
Poet, let passion sleep
Till with the cosmic rhyme
You keep
Eternal tone and time,

By rule of hour and flower,
By strength of stern restraint
And power
To fail and not to faint.

The task is hard to learn
While all the songs of Spring
Return
Along the blood and sing.

Yet hear—from her deep skies,
How Art, for all your pain,
Still cries
Ye must be born again!

Reject the wreath of rose,
Take up the crown of thorn
That shows
To-night a child is born.

The far immortal face
In chosen onyx fine
Enchase,
Delicate line by line.

Strive with Carrara, fight
With Parian, till there steal
To light
Apollo’s pure profile.

Set the great lucid form
Free from its marble tomb
To storm
The heights of death and doom.

Take up the sculptor’s tool!
Recall the gods that die
To rule
In Parian o’er the sky.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the years of work on the wonderful PMO resource.

My Example poem

Be Thus (The Noyes)

I think therefore I am
Rene DesCartes once wrote.
and damn,
I think he’s one to quote.

I’m sure of my belief,
as each of us should be,
Good grief!
…and it’s not fed to me.

I’ve paid some heavy dues
and learned along the way.
Excuse
me- I’ve much more to say.

Examine your own life
let none impose a veil
of strife.
All dogmas will grow stale.

Do I equivocate?
I very seldom do!
It’s late
but I’m not nearly through.

For seeking out what’s fun
that harms no other soul
when done
could well define your role.

Bring joy to all you meet
Don’t magnify your needs
Don’t cheat
then count on prayer beads.

Remember greed provides
no way to be content.
Besides,
it causes discontent.

Enjoy the grass, the trees,
the animals that roam;
and please
enjoy the gifts of home.

© Lawrencealot – July 6, 2014

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The Noyes

The Dowson

• The Dowson is patterned after the poem They Are Not Long, the Weeping and the Laughing by English poet Ernest Dowson (1867-1900). It is this poem that coined the phrase, “the days of wine and roses.” Dowson died at the age of 32 a direct result of his alcoholism.

The Dowson is:
○ stanzaic, 2 quatrains.
○ metered, L1-L3 pentameter, L2 trimeter, L4 dimeter.
○ rhymed abab cdcd, L1-L3 of each stanza ends in feminine rhyme and L2-L4 is masculine rhyme.

They Are Not Long, The Weeping and the Laughing by Ernest Dowson

They are not long, the weeping and the laughter,
Love and desire and hate:
I think they have no portion in us after
We pass the gate.

They are not long, the days of wine and roses:
Out of a misty dream
Our path emerges for awhile, then closes
Within a dream.

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668>
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on the fine PMO resource.

*Note: Although is it not set forth above, I noticed that his poem has each line 2 beginning with a trochee, thus I formed my template below with that construct.

My example poem

Make Time Race (The Dowson)

Though time decays most everything it touches
we can and should have fun.
Though mountains crumble finally in time’s clutches,
We’re not yet done!

The wine and roses really matter, mister.
Life is, it seems, too short.
The thrill, the heat, the trembling when you kissed her.
Enjoy! Cavort!

© Larencealot – June 27, 2014

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The Dowson

The de Tabley

• The de Tabley is a verse form patterned after Chorus from Medea by John Leicester Warren, Lord de Tabley (1835-1895). De Tabley’s poetry reflected his study of the classics and his passion for detail.

The de Tabley is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
○ metric, alternating iambic pentameter and iambic trimeter lines. L1 of each stanza begins with a trochee
○ rhymed, rhymed scheme abab cdcd etc.

Chorus from Medea by John Leicester Warren, Lord de Tabley

SWEET are the ways of death to weary feet,
Calm are the shades of men.
The phantom fears no tyrant in his seat,
The slave is master then.

Love is abolish’d; well, that this is so;
We knew him best as Pain.
The gods are all cast out, and let them go!
Who ever found them gain?

Ready to hurt and slow to succour these;
So, while thou breathest, pray.
But in the sepulchre all flesh has peace;
Their hand is put away.

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668>
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the fine PMO resource.

My example poem

An Old Man’s Dog (The de Tably)

Fate had to play a part in bringing you
looking at pups that day.
Your wife thought it was something fun to do,
and thus you said okay.

Tiny, and still unsteady on my feet,
knowing we had a fit,
I curled up in your hand and felt complete.
How soon you did commit!

Less than a minute passed before we knew
we’d be each other’s pride.
The bond, so evident twixt me and you,
the kennel-master cried.

Never was I an incidental pet
Not just a thing or toy;
We taught each other and we’re learning yet,
thus multiplying joy.

Chewing on shoes is part of puppyhood
and I did spoil one pair.
You said, “Bad dog!” to me, then like you should
hid them from me somewhere.

Bad Dog! became a phrase without a smile
warning me to change my ways.
Those words I haven’t heard now for a while;
I try to earn your praise.

Likely I’ll live until you die my friend.
I’ll miss you every day
and dream of you each night until my end.
I hope it works that way.

Should I become so ill I cannot cope
please take me to the vet.
That in your arms I pass, remains my hope;
just give me one more pet.

© Lawrencealot – June 27, 2014

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The de Tabley