Sapphic Stanza

The Sapphic Stanza is classic Aeolic verse and attributed to the poetess Sappho 6 BC, Greece. Plato so admired her that he spoke of her not as lyricist, poet but called her the 10th Muse. Her poems spoke of relationships and were marked by emotion. In a male dominated era she schooled and mentored women artists on the island of Lesbos and her writing has often been equated with woman-love. “Rather than addressing the gods or recounting epic narratives such as those of Homer, Sappho’s verses speak from one individual to another.” NPOPP. 
Sappho’s work has often been referred to as fragments, because only two of her poems have survived in whole with the vast majority of her work surviving in fragments either from neglect, natural disasters, or possible censorship.
Sapphic Stanza is:
  • quantitative verse, measuring long / short vowels. In English we transition to metric measure of stress / unstressed syllables which warps the rhythm a bit but brings it into context the English ear can hear. L= long s = short
  • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains. This evolved to a quatrain during the Renaissance period from the ancient variable 3 to 4 line stanzas. The quatrain is made up of 3 Sapphic lines followed by an Adonic line which is usually written as a parallel to L3.
    Sapphic line = 11 syllables, trochaic with the central foot being a dactyl
    Adonic line = 5 syllables, a dactyl followed by a trochee
    (see below for more detail on these two components)
  • The modern Sapphic scansion should look like this (Stressed or Long = L; unstressed or short = s )
    Quantitative Verse (L=long syllable * s=short syllable)
    Ls-Ls-Lss-Ls-Ls
    Ls-Ls-Lss-Ls-Ls
    Ls-Ls-Lss-Ls-Ls
    Lss-Ls
    with substituted spondee
    Ls-Ls-Lss-Ls-LL
    Ls-Ls-Lss-Ls-LL
    Ls-Ls-Lss-Ls-LL
    Lss-Ls
  • originally unrhymed, in the Middle Ages the stanza acquired rhyme, rhyme scheme abab. Because of the predominant use of trochee and dactyls the rhyme will generally be feminine or a 2 syllable rhyme with the last syllable unstressed.
  • Adonic line is most often written as a parallel to a previous line. It is the last line of the Sapphic stanza. It is composed in 5 syllables, a dactyl followed by a trochee. It can also be found as a pattern for the refrain in song to honor Adonis, from which it derived its name.
    “death has come near me.”
    last line of 
    Like the gods
    . . . by Sappho 4th century BC
    edited by 
    Richmond Lattimore
    Quantitative Verse
    Lss-Ls
    Meaningless prattle. —jvg
  • Sapphic line -Since the Renaissance period the Sapphic line has been recognized as being a 5 foot trochaic line with the central foot being a dactyl. Prior to the Renaissance period this 11 syllable trochaic pattern was known as the “lesser” Sapphic line and the Sapphic line was a combination of the lesser Sapphic line and an adonic line.After Renaissance Sapphic line Ls-Ls-Lss-Ls-Ls : Passion, lust, consumed our beginnings fully.
    Prior to Renaissance Sapphic line Ls-Ls-Lss-Ls-Ls,- Lss Ls : greed to love? It happened deceptively, tricking emotions.
    Apparently, the technical terms of “lesser” Sapphic and Sapphic lines have been corrupted over time.
My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO

I am restating the specifications for the 21st century English writing poets, knowing full well that academicians may insist we have corrupted Sappho’s use of long and short vowel sounds.  A real poet might strive to make those sounds and the syllabic accents coincide, then none can argue.

A Sapphic Stanza is:
Stanzaic, consisting of any number of quatrains.
Syllabic, each stanza consisting 3 Sapphic Lines plus a Adonic line.
Metrical.  The Sapphic lines being trochaic with the central foot being a dactyl (11 syllables), and          The Adonic lines being a dactyl followed by a trochee (5 syllables)
Rhymed, the pattern being abab.

Example Poem

Quantitative Verse       (Sapphic Stanza)

Seek out passion, write of the trials that poets
face, with no complaint but with guidance, using
items neither trite nor near dying, so it’s
true and amusing.

© Lawrencealot – April 17, 2014

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In this example I have tried to make each accented syllable also use an English long vowel sound.
Sapphic Stanza

Cro Cumaisc Etir Casbairdni Ocus Lethrannaigecht

Cro Cumaisc Etir Casbairdni Ocus Lethrannaigecht
This is an Irish verse form. The name means “Sorry, the translator can’t take your call at the moment”. No, I’m kidding. I have no idea what it means, and not much idea how to pronounce it, though I expect there will be a few “v” sounds in there somewhere. I chose to tackle it because it had the longest name of any in Skelton’s book.
The form calls for 4-line stanzas rhyming abab, with syllable counts of 7/5/7/5. Being Irish, the lengths of the rhyming words are also specified, in this case as 3, 1, 3, 1. Note though that the 3’s don’t necessarily indicate triple rhymes; the requirement is simply that the rhyming words are three syllables long. The stress could be on any of the three syllables.
This example was provoked (I hesitate to say inspired) by the “MP’s expenses” scandal/hysteria of 2009. It amounts to propaganda for the Official Monster Raving Loony Party, a long-established and respected force in British politics. At the time of the 1983 general election, when party splits were fashionable, there was a rival group called the Green Chicken Alliance.
Thanks to Bob Newman for his wonderful Volecentral resource site.
My Example Poem

Suave     (Cro Cumaisc Etir Casbairdni Ocus Lethrannaigecht)

The man was not a millionaire
but ladies sought him out
for he appeared most debonair
and kind without a doubt.

He was at all times affable
with handshake or a hug,
and the idea was laughable
to picture him as smug.

His notions all seemed prevalent
well thought out and germane,
considered and most relevant
and certainly urbane.

He has a style to emulate,
a model for my role.
I’ll have a cause to celebrate
If I achieve that goal.

© Lawrencealot – April 10, 2014

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The a-rhymes must be triple rhyme

 

Classical Hendecasyllable

Classical Hendecasyllable
Type:
Line, Metrical Requirement
Description:
This is a trochee, a dactyl, and three trochees. The first and last trochees can be spondees.
Origin:
Greek
Schematic:
XX Xxx Xx Xx XX or
Xx Xxx Xx Xx Xx
Line/Poem Length:
11
See Also:
Status:
Incomplete
To contact us, e-mail thegnosticpoet@poetrybase.info.
Copyright © 2001-2013 by Charles L. Weatherford. All rights reserved.
Thanks to Charles for the wonderful resource above, which after investigation is frequently the only one I need.
I found these in quatrains with abab rhyme, and in a single 15 line unrhymed stanza by Robert Frost. “For Once, Then, Something” the only such he ever wrote in this form.
Example Poem

Extinguished          (Classical Hendecasyllable)

Glowing embers ignite when fanned with ardour
left alone they conserve by self-containment.
Love’s lost heat can be flamed by trying harder
Or, ignored and then settled by arraignment.

(c) Lawrencealot – March 2, 2014

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Double Seven

This interesting form was created by Lisa La Grange of Allpoetry.
It is stanzaic, consisting of any number of quatrains.
Each quatrain will have its own abab rhyme pattern,
Where the a-rhymes will always be feminine.
It is isosyllabic, each line being seven syllables.
It is metric, each line having two metric feet, the first foot being four syllables, and the second foot being three syllables.
The a-rhyme lines consist of a secundus paeon + an amphibrach: da DUM da da / da DUM da
The b-rhyme lines consist of a tertius paeon + an anapest
 da da DUM da / da da DUM
So the meter of a stanza is thus:
da DUM da da da DUM da
da da DUM da, da da DUM
da DUM da da da DUM da
da da DUM da da da DUM.

Example Poem

Just-Married(Double Seven)

I wonder if the bridegroom
has accepted yet the fact
that access to the bathroom
will be science, inexact.
I she wants to go shopping
and he’s planned a poker game,
I think that he’ll be copping
friends a plea they’ll know is lame.
But he may find his laundry
looks much better than before
and find there is no quandary
for it’s him she does adore.
© Lawrencealot – February 24, 2014
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Where the red letters indicate lines with feminine rhyme.

Trolaan

Trolaan, created by Valerie Peterson Brown, is a poem consisting of 4 quatrains.
Each quatrain begins with the same letter. The rhyme scheme is abab.
Starting with the second stanza you use the second letter of the first line of the first stanza to write the second each line beginning with that letter.
On the third stanza you will use the second letter on the first line of the second stanza and write the third each line beginning with that letter.
On the fourth stanza you will use the second letter on the first line of the third stanza and write the fourth each line beginning with that letter.
There is no mandatory line length or meter specified. (Added)

Example #1:
Distraught Blessings

Desire the sound or hope,
deluding minds in darkness.
Daunting though its scope,
deluged now with the access.

Elope into the morrow,
envelope me with song.
Enclose me now in sorrow
easing against the throng.

Longing for succulent prospect,
laying waste to eager night,
Lopsided in neglect,
listless with delight.

Only now will I protest,
owning nothing less.
Opening now I detest,
one more time to bless
.

Copyright © 2008 Valerie Peterson Brown

 
My example poem

In Sincerity, One Word or Two     (Trolaan)

Don’t you now know I love you so?
Did I not tell you many times?
Do leaves not rustle when wind blows?
Devotion I spell out in rhymes.

Oh Sweetheart, never doubt my love.
Other young ladies hit on me.
Occasionally I will sort of
Omit offending, don’t you see?

How can you feel demeaned, my sweet?
Harangues are not required at all.
Heaven knows they are not as neat.
Have trust! I love you most of all.

Open relationships are fun.
Of course I only play around
on those times I am with someone.
Otherwise, it’s with you I’m found.

© Lawrencealot – July 7, 2013

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LaGrange Quatrain

 La Grange Quatrain created by Lisa La Grange of AllPoetry
Syllabic: 8/7/8/7
 Rhyme scheme: aba                  
Meter: Tertius paeon

dee dee DUM dee, dee dee DUM dee                                
dee dee DUM dee, dee dee DUM                                
dee dee DUM dee, dee dee DUM dee                                
dee dee DUM dee, dee dee DUM
Note alternating feminine and masculine rhymes.
 Example Poem
 
Forfeited Opportunity     (La Grange Quatrain)

Undeserved, he’s still receiving
approbation from the left.
While the right is past deceiving
and he forces wide the cleft.

A white guilt, earned by grandfathers
and augmented by black pride
brought to office one who bothers
not at all laws to abide.

Our first black to claim the title
has mis-used the office throne
gaining wealth as though entitled.
redistributes what’s our own.

Were I black I’d be resenting
the destruction he’s allowed;
this historic representing
should have made all races proud.

© Lawrencealot – November 2,2013
Poem my be any multiple of 4 lines.
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Romantic Stanza

Stanzaic:   Any number of quatrains.
Syllabic:    Multiple versions. I have seen 11/11/10/7, but documented here are:
                 the Wordsworth version: 11/11/11/7, and the 11/10/11/7 version.
Meter:     Dactylic, with the final foot being either catalectic or brachycatalectic
                (lacking either one or two syllables).  
Rhyme:    cross rhyme, end-rhyme abab.
Refrain:   The first 7 syllable of line one making up line 4.
Romantic stanza
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, Repetitive Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Stanzaic
Description:
Alternating quatrains of basically dactylic meter where lines one and three have eleven syllables, line two has ten, and line four is the first seven syllables of line one.
Attributed to:
Maksim Bahdanovic, stanza so named by Bob Newman
Origin:
Belarus
Schematic:
Rhyme: (Ba)baB
Meter:
Xxx Xxx Xxx Xx
Xxx Xxx Xxx X
Xxx Xxx Xxx Xx
Xxx Xxx X
Starting Point:
With each quatrain, start with the first/last line, since that line establishes your rhymes.
Maksim Bahdanovič (1891-1917) was the greatest lyric poet in the Belarusian language, and one of his best-loved poems is entitled simply Romance. It begins, “Venus, new-risen above us appearing…” The verse form it uses is unusual and quite tricky. There is no standard name for it, so I have chosen to call it the romantic stanza. As an example, here is an alternative version of a well-known poem by Wordsworth: Daffodils
The form was named Romantic Stanza by Bob Newman
 
Example PoemsOut Genesis

Clustering, combining dust aggregates in time
Assembling Hydrogen particles as they must
be a bit weightier so they may start their climb.
Clustering, combining dust.

Billions of our years go by with no life at all.
Galaxies born, made of stars that explode and die.
Pressures of their dying create life’s wherewithal.
Billions of our years go by.

Busting outward from that blast, heavy elements
driven here by cosmic winds let know life commence.
all living things spring from cataclysmic events
bursting outward from that blast.

© Lawrencealot – January 26, 2013

unpublished

Since the specifications contain so much variance, I did the above in formal Dactylic tetramter, and the following in the indicated 11/10/11/7 format.
Neither are exactly the pattern used by the creator’s famous poem.

Our Genesis   (Romantic Stanza – 11/10/11/7 Version)

Clustering, combining dust aggregating
assembling Hydrogen just as it must.
Assembling atoms, Helium’s a-making,
Clustering, combining dust.

Billions of our years gone by with life absent.
Galaxies born, made from stars as they die.
Pressures of their dying create content .
Billions of our years gone by.

Busting outward from that blast, all elements
required for biologic life at last.
All living things sprung from stars’ final events,
bursting outward from that blast.

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Rannaigheacht mhor

Rannaigheacht mhor (ron-á-yach voor, the ‘great versification’) is an ancient Irish quatrain using 7-syllable lines with 1-syllable end-words rimed ababa-rime can be assonance, but b-rime must be rime, here meaning perfect ‘correspondence’ or Comharda, in which consonants of the same class (p-t-k, m-n-ng etc.) are interchangeable—plus alliteration in every line—preferably between end-word and preceding stressed word (always thus in each quatrain’s closing couplet)—with at least two cross-rimes per couplet (assonance okay in leading couplets), one being L3’s end-word rimed within L4.  Being Irish, it requires the dunedh(first word, phrase, or line repeated in closing).  Each quatrain, as well as each leading couplet, must be able to stand on its own.
Modern specs for this form are given here:
Great Versifiers
Men sometimes are dreamers, lost,
lust-driven schemers who, when
hunting, deceive.  With trust  tossed
at great cost; none believe men.

(c) Lawrencealot – May 16, 2012

No template can be more than a rough guide, but here one is:
Note here, I failed to use proscribed alliteration in the final line! Damn.
And upon sober review I find that this fails also, in that the first
couplet cannot stand alone.  Someone competent, please provide me with a perfect example.  I shall replace this.

Ragonelle

The form was invented by Adaline Reilly, aka -AJ on Allpoetry.

Rhyming: abab
Syllable Count: 12/7/12/7
There are no requirements for specific meter.

Example poem

Go Ahead (Ragonelle)

Every time I let some one jump ahead in line
Since their item count is small
I realize that for the folks who come behind
order matters not at all.

The time I did this last, was at a big box store
Gads! She only had ice-cream.
“Sure, go ahead”, I said suppressing dread once more.
Here’s my most recurring theme:

Here, membership’s required and knowing that’s not hard.
This miss tried to scam the game;
The supervisor said “Maa’m, that is not your card.
He let her stay, just the same.

Of course the credit card she first tried, failed the test
the second one would not do,
“A debit or a club card maa’m.” (or cash I guessed.
The lady was not yet through.

The third card was a debit card that rang the chimes,
the gal’s face lit up with joy,
to make it work she’d had to swipe the thing three times.
I was then a happy boy.

© Lawrencealot – August 4, 2013


Here is a visual template

 

7/5 Trochee Poetry Form

The 7/5 Trochee, created by Andrea Dietrich,
of 2 or more quatrain stanzas ( 8 lines or more)  with the following set rules:

Meter:  Trochaic
Syllabic: 7/5/7/5
Rhyme Scheme:  abcb or abab

The meter is trochee, which means alternating stressed and
unstressed beats in each line, with each line beginning and
ending in a stressed syllable. This is a simple lyrical type|little poem, so rhymes will be basic, nothing fancy.

The poem itself should give a description of something of interest to the poet.

There is not a set number of these quatrain type stanzas,

but a typical 7/5 Trochee would consist of two quatrains,

with the second stanza serving to tie up the idea presented in the first stanza.

Pasted from <http://www.shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/75trochee.html>

 Example Poem

Nap

Sleeping eight hours every night
Seems to some divine.
Choosing such is quite their right.
Just don’t make it mine.

 I will sleep that much or more.
taking smaller blocks.
For in afternoon I snore
Even wearing socks.

 

© Lawrencealot –  June 19, 2012
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