Double Seven

This interesting form was created by Lisa La Grange of Allpoetry.
It is stanzaic, consisting of any number of quatrains.
Each quatrain will have its own abab rhyme pattern,
Where the a-rhymes will always be feminine.
It is isosyllabic, each line being seven syllables.
It is metric, each line having two metric feet, the first foot being four syllables, and the second foot being three syllables.
The a-rhyme lines consist of a secundus paeon + an amphibrach: da DUM da da / da DUM da
The b-rhyme lines consist of a tertius paeon + an anapest
 da da DUM da / da da DUM
So the meter of a stanza is thus:
da DUM da da da DUM da
da da DUM da, da da DUM
da DUM da da da DUM da
da da DUM da da da DUM.

Example Poem

Just-Married(Double Seven)

I wonder if the bridegroom
has accepted yet the fact
that access to the bathroom
will be science, inexact.
I she wants to go shopping
and he’s planned a poker game,
I think that he’ll be copping
friends a plea they’ll know is lame.
But he may find his laundry
looks much better than before
and find there is no quandary
for it’s him she does adore.
© Lawrencealot – February 24, 2014
Visual Template
Where the red letters indicate lines with feminine rhyme.

Black Narcissus Tercet Rima

This form was invent by Barry Hopkins, aka Black Narcissus on Allpoetry.

As it turns out this is NOT a new form, indicated be the comment below: but the poet thought it was, and I am not knowledgeable enough to recognize historic precedents all of the time.  I’m leaving it, as it is a friendly form that has already gained some traction on Allpoetry, but a reading of the link below will give some proper attribution to previous users.
_____
Quote from Mary Boren:
“I agree that it’s a very pleasing metrical pattern, Larry, but I wouldn’t call it a newly invented form.  It has been used extensively in traditional verse of  the past and is especially popular in Australian Bush Verse.  I can’t point to any specific examples from famous poets, but
was written in 2001.”
________
It consist of tercet stanzas.
It is syllabic 8/8/11
Rhyme Pattern: aab ccb dde ffe...(aabccbddeffe…)
Meter: Anapest,
Sort lines:  Amphibrach,Trochee for the short lines.
                   da da DUM da DUM da DUM da (hence feminine rhyme)
Long Line   Anapest, Amphibrach,Trochee,Amphimacer for the long line
                   da da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM
Example
Cricket. ( By Jiminy! ) – Black Narcissus
It’s the willow on the leather
and the doubts about the weather
that make cricket, lovely cricket, great for me.
There’s a batsman and a bowler
and a light or heavy roller
that make cricket more like outdoor poetry.
There’s a googly and a flipper,
there’s the team and there’s the skipper,
there is D.R.S and snicko for an edge.
There’s a twelfth man and a third man,
there was body line and Bradman
and the Aussies who are often known to sledge.
There’s a bouncer and a beamer
and the wily English seamer
who can move the ball in ways I can’t describe.
There are pace men there are spinners,
there are losers there are winners
and some cheaters who’ve been known to take a bribe.
We’ve created twenty/twenty
where the runs are scored a’plenty
and one fifty is about an average score.
Yet I much prefer test cricket
on a fifth day turning wicket;
after five days though it might just be a draw.
Visual Template



Amaranth poetry form

Amaranth is an invented verse form that was probably created as a teaching tool by Viola Gardner. It makes deliberate use of the 9 most common metric feet. Each line is one metric foot, the pattern changing from line to line. 
The Amaranth is:
  • 9 lines strophe. It is a stand alone poem.
  • metric, the 9 most common metric feet are used in sequence.
    L1 Spondee SS
    L2 Iamb uS
    L3 Pyrrhic uu
    L4 Dactyl Suu
    L5 Trochee Su
    L6 Amphimacer SuS
    L7 Choriamb SuuS
    L8 Anapest uuS
    L9 Amphibrach uSu
  • rhymed at the discretion of the poet, although the metric restrictions are probably enough to contend with in this verse form.On the Cross by Judi Van GorderBehold!
    I am
    without
    sinfulness.
    Blameless,
    innocent
    guileless, bereft
    pleasing God
    forever.
With sincere thanks to Judi Van Gorder  for the above from the wonderful PMO site.
My Example Poem
Psychiatry     (Amaranth)
Wisecracks
are made
in the
analyst’s
office
shedding light,
clearing the way
for a true
discourse.
© Lawrencealot – November 27, 2013
Visual Template

Lisa Rima

This is a new form invented by Lisa La Grange of Allpoetry.
It consists of two or more quatrains of set syllabic length.
and with a specified rhyme pattern.
Syllable are: 8/8/8/3, and
Rhyme is: zzza
Meter is:
da da DUM da DUM da DUM da for the 8 syllable lines, and
da da DUM for the final line of each stanza.
(Anapest, amphibrach, trochee,  (same thing as Anapest, iamb, iamb) then
Anapest for line 4)
Example Poem












Pony Up
 

 
I suppose our band is corny,
and our plight about as thorny,
as a Bishop getting horny.
That’s a bit. 

Now John Wayne is bold and dashing,
and friend Clint is big on smashing,
and they both are really cashing
in on it. 

The guitar I play beautif’ly,
I quaff my beers down dutif’ly
and play poker quite fruitfully
when I sit. 

When required my firearm shooting
at the bandits who are looting
will just leave the children hooting
quite a bit.
It’s for peanuts that we’re playing
that’s despite skill we’re displaying
so if they do not start paying
I shall quit. 

© Lawrencealot – August 24,2013
Here is a Visual Template:
 
 

Gregory’s Refrain – (Gregi)

This is a poetry form invented in 2008 by Gregory James, writing on Allpoetry.com as Psydewaystears
The poem is Stanzaic, consisting of three or more octets.
Syllable: 8/7/8/7/7/7/7/7
Rhyme: ababxcxc
Refrain: Lines  5 through 7, first four syllables
The Refrain is required for the majority of the stanzas.
Meter:  long lines generally: Anapest,Iamb,Anapest  (da da DUM da DUM da da DUM)
                             Other lines: Anapest,Iamb,Iamb         (da da DUM da DUM da DUM)
Note: These specifications were derived and interpreted by myself, and the meter particularly is not hard and fast, but serves only as the normal guideline.
Example Poem
When the task you have before you
seems too large for just one man
just remember there’s one more view
to describe your total plan.
Do a little bit right now
Do a little more today
Save a little for tomorrow
it’s more doable that way.
When your tea’s much too hot to drink
you don’t throw it all away,
you just wait a while I would think.
come back later, it’s okay.
While you’re waiting check your mail,
While you’re waiting make a call,
While you’re waiting tidy up.
Oh, that tea– you’ve drunk it all.
When the trellis stands starkly bare
though it wants to be embraced
it just waits, and does not despair.
and soon vines will kiss its face.
The vine pushes through the earth.
The vine pushes up the wall,
The vine pushes every day,
up the trellis proud and tall.
While the Mona Lisa looks fit,
I hear Leonardo deigned
it unfinished, he never quit
in the doing much was gained.
Just do part of what you figure
is the task ahead of you
even though you never finish
when you’re done the job is through.
© Lawrencealot – August 28, 2013
Visual Template

Fifteener

This form was introduced to AllPoetry and promoted by Jeff Green, aka Crickenjeff.

I find references to the fifteener as being a very old poetic form, but with no specifications as to meter or rhyme.  Jeff’s form requires lyrical meter and couplet rhyme.  You may choose any meter and rhyme pattern.
The meter of a fine tertius fifteener is like this:
diddy-DUM-di diddy-DUM-di diddy-DUM-di diddy-DUM
It is quite addictive meter, much more complex than the rest
With it’s triple tertius paeons followed by an anapest.
 
Example Poem

Play? Bawl? (Fifteener)

The most talented of poets had all gathered at the meet,
they had traveled from afar on this occasion to compete.
When the master from olde England asked for anapestic verse,
or for tertius combinations, which I figured would be worse,
like a quakin’ asp I shivered for just iambs give me pause.
Though my mentor’s shoulders shrugged, “You won’t be breaking any laws
but the caliber of poet, especially at the top
all deserved their invitation, you won’t want to pen a flop.”
With that ringing non-endorsement I was tempted then to pass,
when I thought of all the heroes who had struggled to the last;
While the wisps of nighttime zephyrs then pushed random thought a way,
I remembered all the champions who down, still chose to play.
It was time for this young poet to show all that he was stout.
‘Cus the ball game isn’t over until Casey’s bat strikes out.

© Lawrencealot – September 23, 2013

Here is a Visual Template:
 

15-10 Alternating Poetry Form

A poem where 15 syllable stanzas which begin with an anapest foot and having couplet rhyme

alternate with 10 syllable iambic stanzas with cross rhyme.

Rhyme Pattern: aabb cdcd

(aabbccdd), 16 lines or more, alternating line length

 

I first saw this used by Jeff Green but have no idea if is already a name form.

 

Example Poem

Constitutional Deficiency

 A democracy cannot endure when gimme people learn
that they can persuade their reps to confiscate what others earn.
This was first proclaimed by Tytler, then Alexis de Tocqueville
The right to direct one’s earnings is in fact what makes one free.

My liberal friends think as I once did,
that government should cure whatever’s wrong.
I recognized my error as a kid.
Someone must pay the piper for his song.

 We’ve had only one elected man at top who truly tried
to impede the juggernaught we’ve wrought but could not hold the tide.
To defend our nation, use its strength to minimize abuse
are enough, but power wants more growth and leaps to find excuse.

The Tytle Cycle must run its full course.
Our try died not from faulty prior design.
We’ll work for masters like the noble horse.
The blame my friends is really yours and mine.

© Lawrencealot – Feb. 7, 2013

Visual Template

5/3 Meter Poetry form

A poem consisting of an odd number of quatrains (15 lines or more)
I have no idea if this form has been otherwise named, if you know please advise.
Alternating lines of 5 and 3 syllables, where
the odd lines consist of  an IAMB and an ANAPEST
da-DUM da-DUM-da
and the even lines consist of a DACTYL
DUM-da-DUM

Each stanza uses individual rhyme pattern –abab
where the b-rhymes are always feminine rhyme

The first stanza is a refrain, repeated as the final stanza. 

 

Example poem:

Paradise Kept   (5 3 Meter)

Such colors are not
accidents
so birds then forgot
abstinence.

Their evolution
manifest
a bright solution
was the best.When foes are but few
we evolve
with different view,
with resolve.

Most survive with ease
but compete
to awe and appease–
the elite.

They sung and they played
and they danced
their colors arrayed
to enhance.

Let man not destroy
thru his greed
the habitat of joy
where.they breed.

Such colors are not
accidents
so birds then forgot
abstinence.

© Lawrencealot – March 30, 2013

Visual Template
5-3 Meter
 
 
 

Limerick

A limerick (is):
  1. is five lines long,
  2. is based on the rhythm “da-da-DAH” (anapest meter)
  3. has two different rhymes.
  4. Lines 1, 2, and 5 have three of those da-da-DAH “feet,” and rhyme with each other.
  5. Lines 3 and 4 have two, and rhyme with each other.
So the basic form is:
da da DAH / da da DAH / da da BING
da da DAH / da da DAH / da da DING
da da DAH / da da BAM
da da DAH / da da WHAM
da da DAH / da da DAH / da da PING
Limericks can:
  1. drop the first “da” in a line, changing that foot to da-DAH (iamb).
  2. add an extra “da” or two at the end of a line IF it’s used for an extended rhyme, such as people and steeple or cannibal and Hannibal.
  3. use special fonts or characters to make a point,
A Limerick is a rhymed humorous or nonsense poem of five lines which originated in Limerick, Ireland.
The Limerick has a set rhyme scheme of : a-a-b-b-a with a syllable structure of: 9-9-6-6-9.

Limericks can also be written in AMPHIBRACH meter

– two lines of amphibrachic trimeter, two lines of amphibrachic dimeter,

and a final line of amphibrachic trimeter.

Below my visual template shows two perfectly acceptable Limerick Forms.
In the strictest sense limericks should be a single five line poem.  Currently you find many poets stringing them together as stanzas.
Example Poem

The Lady and the Hat

The Lady in the Hat

The lady was well put together
with her tats and hat with a feather
I longed so to treasure
her feminine pleasure
at my place or hers, if she’d rather.

A limerick in amphibrach meter.

With a hat with a feather in place
and a corset constricting her waist
She said, nodding at me
“Take me home if you’re free
I so need a young man to embrace. “

A limerick in anapest meter

(c) Lawrencealot – 2013

_______________________________________________-

For most of three years, that is all I had to say about the subject. During which I a learned a great deal about the permitted mechanics and devices formally allow in writing a poem in a specific meter.
Note: The following explanation is the most correct I have seen, and shows that one FOOT can easily morph into another, because headless feet, and catalectic feet are always s permitted poetic devise which denies counting syllables any validity in defining metrics.

THE STRUCTURE OF A LIMERICK
 
 
Limericks are short poems of five lines having rhyme structure AABBA. It is officially described as a form of ‘anapestic trimeter’.
The ‘anapest’ is a foot of poetic verse consisting of three syllables, the third longer (or accentuated to a greater degree) than the first two: da-da-DA. The word ‘anapest’ shows it’s own metric: anaPEST.
Lines 1, 2 and 5 of a limerick should ideally consist of three anapests each, concluding with an identical or similar phoneme to create the rhyme.
Lines 3 and 4 are shorter, constructed of two anapests each and again rhyming with each other with the overall rhyme structure of AABBA.
 
The anapest metric must show the following pattern:
(da) da DA da da DA da da DA (da) (da)
(da) da DA da da DA da da DA (da) (da)
(da) da DA da da DA (da)
(da) da DA da da DA (da)
(da) da DA da da DA da da DA (da) (da)
Meaning that you can leave off the syllables in parentheses.
But 1, 2 and 5 should match each other, and 3 and 4 should match.

Pasted from
http://whvvugt.home.xs4all.nl/Archives_TCCMB/Limericks/Structure.htmlI

I would love to give attribution, but can do no better than the URL, which belongs to a private domain, but I do thank Andrea Detriech for bringing it to my attention.

But you will note, that by paying attention to these requirements our amphibrach limerick is indeed anapestic as well.

 

Visual Templates

Anapest version

Amphibrach Version