Rhaiku

A Poetry form invented on AP by Matt
A poem consisting of One stanza of Rhyme, one stanza of haiku,
 and one stanza of free verse.
The order of the components is up to the poet.
 
Example Poem
 
Without Repentance
semi-clad, somnolent,
climbing over broken logs–
kids explore their camp
There had been no time
in the circadian twilight
to properly define the false
Niagara bubbling, with snatches
of Mozart melodies
into nearby brook.
The first awake, they had to take their tawny dog and find
the wonders here that did appear, as frozen, left behind
for summer time respite.  They’d climb and swim and even shout;
for being loud was here allowed, and home-based rules were out-
maybe fleecing their sister (decreasing her oatmeal share),
Some things do last without contrast and happen anywhere.
(c) Lawrencealot – October 20, 2012
Visual Template
 
 

Paired Triquin

This is a form recently invented by Gary Kent Spain, aka venicebard on allpoetry.
To Quote Gary:
 Some paired what, you say?  This is a form I invented recently, not just to invent a form but because I liked the sound of it.
‘Triquin’ is a reversal of ‘quatrain’ (I dropped the a because both ‘triquain’ and ‘troisquain’ sounded funny to me) and is defined as a three-line stanza consisting of:
L1 – trochee-iamb-iamb-iamb
(DUM de de DUM de DUM de DUM);
L2 – iamb-iamb-iamb-iamb
(de DUM de DUM de DUM de DUM)
L3 – (indented) iamb-iamb 
(de DUM de DUM);
and it must contain alliteration between two consecutive stressed words in one of its lines,
and the final consonant sound of L2 must match that of L3(last two consonants,
if the last syllables of both end in two or more consonant sounds).
‘Paired Triquins’ specifically refers to two of these forming one six-line stanza,
with another variant allowed (only if one wishes) for the new L5, namely:
pyrrhic-spondee-iamb-iamb   (de de DUM DUM de DUM de DUM)
…and the additional requirement of having the 1st and 3rd DUMs of L2 rime the third DUM of L1,
and the 1st and 3rd DUMs of L5 rime the 2nd and 4th, respectively, of L4.
Syllabic schematic:
XxxXxAxX
xAxXxAxT
     xXxT [‘T’= terminal consonant]
XxxBxXxC
xBxXxCxT [or xxBXxCxT]
       xXxT

Example Poem

Mentor   (Paired Triquin Pair)
Scoundrels will scheme and squirm to make
you learn what you have spurned in past
    these tasks attest.
Welsh as this seems, it to’s been true
in dreams,  these I eschew sometimes,
     but not new forms.
Granted not gracing our fair bard
this hour would only sour myself.
    There’d be no riff.
Colleges fail,  but mentors don’t;
they’re hale and really won’t give up.
    They just can’t stop.
© Lawrencealot – June 20, 2013

Visual Template


Octameter

Octameter, created by Shelley A. Cephas,
is a poem made up of 16 lines
divided into two stanzas of 8 lines each.
Each line has a syllable count of 5.
The set rhyme scheme is: abcdedfd ghcgigdd  (abcdedfdghcgigdd)
I found this form defined on Shadow Poetry.
Of all the poetry forms I have studied none has been affixed with a more misleading and potentially confusing name.
Example Poem

T-aint Octameter  (Octameter)

Most mis-named form seen–
the Octameter.
That’s a standard line
length measured in feet.
I ambs, trochees, such
which decide the beat.
Confusing girth with
length was not too neat.

It’s an octastitch.
Can’t quarrel at all.
If this form were mine
There’d be a name switch.
Say.. an octapent;
gone the need to bitch.
Current name is scat,
Cephas should fix that.

© Februrary 5, 2013

Visual Template

Trilonnet

Created by Shelley A. Cephas
A 14 line poem made up of four tercets and one rhyming couplet.
Meter: iambic tetrameter or iambic pentameter.
Each 3 line verse is an unrhymed triplet, but there is rhyming between the stanzas..
2 rhyme schemes: abcabcabcabcdd  or abccbaabccbadd

Example Poem

Little Brick Library

When I was young,  and that means wee,
My nearby library did astound.
I started stopping every day.

I’d roam the shelves from about  three
’til five o’clock or ’til I’d found
one book I could not put away.

It was wonderful they were free;
the best resource that I had found
and books had so darn much to say.

This was long ‘fore girls intrigued me.
The building was a good friend found,
where I’d rather hang-out than play.

Those short years opened wide the door.
to much I still plan to explore.

(c) Lawrencealot – May 4, 2012

Visual Template