Rondeau Prime

• The Rondeau Prime is a short variation of the Rondeau originating in 13th century France. It allows more rhyme than the Rondeau, but incorporates its defining feature of the integration of the rentrement. (opening phrase of the first line which is repeated as a refrain.)
The Rondeau Prime is:
○ in French syllabic, in English tends to be iambic meter, line length is optional as long as the lines are relatively equal, with the exception of the shorter rentrement.
○ 12 lines, made up of a septet (7 lines) followed by a cinquain (5 lines).
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme abbccbR abbaR, R being the rentrement.

Wind on the Terrace by Judi Van Gorder7-12-05

A leaf in the wind taps the pane,
reminding me that you have gone.
Although my busy days move on,
it is small moments that I miss,
a gesture, glance, a touch, a kiss.
You went away before the dawn,
a leaf in the wind.

I watch the clouds bring in the rain,
the tears that fall and splash upon
the terrace of a time withdrawn,
the sound repeating your refrain,
a leaf in the wind.

 

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1382#prime
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

Rondeau Prime
Type: Structure, Metrical Requirement, Repetitive Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement
Description: Two-part French form that is isosyllabic except for the shorter refrains. The refrain is the first part of the first line.
Origin: French
Schematic: (Ra)bbaabR abbaR

R = refrain and first part of first line.
Line/Poem Length: 12

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/002/230.shtml
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

Specifications restated, The Rondeau Prime is:
A 12 line poem of French origin, (variation of the Rondeau)
Syllabic in French, often iambic in English
Isosyllabic lines, except for the shorter refrain lines
Rhyme Scheme: (Ra)bbaabR abbaR,
where R is the first part of the first line and becomes the refrain.

My example

If Pigs Could Fly (Form: Rondeau Prime)

If pigs could fly men would have had
another bacon source of course
and fought their wars on pig and horse,
and knights courting their maidens fair
would routinely arrive by air
(and no-fly zones would be in force),
if pigs could fly.

Demand for goats would rise a tad
as farmers would of course endorse
a new refuse disposal source.
My backyard mud-hole would be rad
if pigs could fly.

© Lawrencealot – January 18, 2015

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Rondeau Prime

Lira

Spanish Poetry
Lira, is a shortened variation of the Canción. The Lira “loosely refers to any short strophe” NPEOPP. The most commonly referred to features of the verse are the repetition of L2 in L5 and a rhyme scheme of aBabB, both of which narrow the verse to a stanzaic form, the quintain. Other frames were also suggested but with less definition. The quintain stanzaic form was apparently the most popular form of the Lira in 16th century Spain. 

The Lira is:
• stanzaic, popularly written in one or a short number of cinquains. The form is occasionally found in sixains and on rare occasions, quatrains.
• syllabic, the lines are usually in a fixed pattern of Italianate lines, (7 and 11 syllables). The last line of the stanza is always 11 syllables. The first stanza establishes the fixed pattern.
• often written with L2 repeated as L5.
• rhymed, often using only consonant rhyme. The most common rhyme scheme is aBabB, but alternatives could be aBaBcC, abbacC, abABcC 

Computer Connection by Judi Van Gorder

Fingertips rapidly tap, 
chosen letters appear in black on the screen.
Words are formed to fill the gap 
between thoughts and sounds unseen.
Chosen letters appear in black on the screen.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1016
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Arrival on Track 3 (Lira)

When she stepped down from the train,
approaching from behind I quickly kissed her.
But, but, but I must explain,
’twasn’t her – ’twas her sister.
Approaching from behind I quickly kissed her.

© Lawrencealot – December 16, 2014

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The Tennyson

The Tennyson is a stanzaic form patterned after Ask Me No More by English poet,Alfred Lord Tennyson (1802-1892).

The Tennyson is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of cinquains.
○ metric, iambic, L1-L4 are pentameter and L5 is dimeter.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme abbaC deedC fggfC etc.
○ written in with L5 as a refrain repeated from stanza to stanza.

Ask Me No More by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Ask me no more: the moon may draw the sea;
The cloud may stoop from heaven and take the shape,
With fold to fold, of mountain or of cape;
But O too fond, when have I answer’d thee?
————–Ask me no more.
Ask me no more: what answer should I give?
I love not hollow cheek or faded eye:
Yet, O my friend, I will not have thee die!
Ask me no more, lest I should bid thee live;
————–Ask me no more.

Ask me no more: thy fate and mine are seal’d:
I strove against the stream and all in vain:
Let the great river take me to the main:
No more, dear love, for at a touch I yield;
————–Ask me no more.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful PMO resource.

My Example Poem

Wastrel ( The Tennyson)

I wasted time throughout my early years.
and emphasized my chase for corporate gold.
I knew of course, that everyone grows old
unless an early death brings loved-ones tears.
I wasted time.

I wasted time while children’s magic bloomed,
and took for granted miracles in play.
I let too many moments slip away.
I failed to nurture love that was presumed.
I wasted time.

I wasted time just letting days go by.
But now I savor simple daily things-
a child that laughs, a parakeet that sings-
and cannot help but often wonder why
I wasted time.
© Lawrencealot – July 29, 2014

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The Tennyson

Badger’s Hexastitch

This form was found on PoetryMagnumOpus with the information below.  I will give full attribution to the creator when I can.
Badger’s Hexastich is a fun variation of the Crapsey Cinquain invented by our own Badger. It simply expands the cinquain to another line and 2 more syllables.
Badger’s Hexastich is:
  • a poem in 6 lines.
  • syllabic, 2/4/6/6/4/2.
  • unrhymed, optional rising and falling end-words.
reading,
rooted in mind,
not tasting ripe berries,
the oozing summer scent,
window open,
waiting
~~Phil Wood
First flight,
small granddaughter
visits Grandma with Dad,
Mom, brother and sisters
in soccer play-offs
back home.
Judi Van Gorder
My Example Poem
Growing
Fall down
consider tears–
crawl to where grandpa sits
grab onto grandpa’s leg
grin like a fox–
stand up
© Lawrencealot – February 16, 2014

Whyquain

A form invented on AllPoetry.com by Gloria Kim, aka Porphery. 
It is a single verse of five iambic tetrameter lines in monorhyme
which answers some asked or un-asked question.
 
Example Poem:
 
Why Do Cats Purr
 
While dogs can bark and growl and grrrr
and guard, and stealthy thieves deter,
which earned their place with men for sure,
The cats had only pretty fur,
so asked if God would add a purr.
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