Deachnadh Cummaisc

Deachnadh Cummaisc and Deachnadh Mor are ancient Irish Verse Forms that use consonant rhyme, not true rhyme. (easier said than done.)
• The defining features of the Deachnadh Cummaisc are:
○ written in any number of quatrains.
○ syllabic 8-4-8-4 or 8-4-4-8
○ written with consonance rhyme only abab cdcd etc
○ terminated, usually written with 2 syllable end words.
○ when L3 is written with a 2 syllable end word, aicill rhyme is employed.
○ written with the defining features of most Celtic poems, cywddydd (harmony of sound) and dunadh (ending the poem with the same word, phrase or line with which the poem began) Irish Verse Forms

x x x x x x (x a)
x x (x B) 
x x x x x x (x a)
x x a (x B) 

This Time of Year by Barbara Hartman

Today on Lizard Head, snow-pack 
recoils, recedes
— streams swell, dry reservoirs snapback, 
resource restored. 

Creeks cavort, rush to join rivers, 
boulders tumble. 
The Dolores races, shivers, 
quivers, trembles. 

White-water rapids slap riprap, 
romp, run away, 
Rocky Mountain snowcap renders 
runoff today.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1174
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

(Commonly used in Celtic verse forms.) According to the NPEOPP aicill rhyme is simply rhyming an end word of one line with a word somewhere early in the next line. Robin Skelton’s Shapes of our Singing takes it a step further and states aicill rhyme occurs when the end word of the first line is disyllabic. An on-line source describing Gaelic pronunciation takes it another step further describing aicill rhyme as occuring when the last stressed syllable of an end word rhymes with the next to last unstressed word in the next line with no mention that the end word need by disyllabic. (Gaelic examples I’ve been able to find seem to support all 3 definitions, of course I can’t really hear the stressed/unstressed definition but one example appeared as if the internal rhyme could be unstressed by the position in the line and the words around it.)

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1261#aicill>

 

My Example

Welcome (Deachnadh Cummaisc)

Welcome, Delighted you arrived.
There’s a passel
to pass around.
So party-up! Don’t be passive.

Just shove the cat or dog away
They’ll feel perplexed,
and put awry,
but will stay, willing to partake.

They’ll willingly clean your fingers
with tongues wagging
when you’re finished.
It’s our way to make you welcome.

© Lawrencealot – November 28, 2014

Note: Below is what happens when you return to the desk, thinking that you were to be writing a poem with rhymes in assonance not consonance. This was my first effort, replaced with the above.

Welcome (Deachnadh Cummaisc)

Welcome. Delighted you arrived.
Last year callers
have all survived.
We’re festive drinkers, not brawlers.

Just shove the cat or dog aside,
although pesky
pets, they’ll abide;
It’s granpa who could get testy

We’ll jointly address your spirit
and your welfare.
Hell? Don’t fear it .
There’s someplace you’re always welcome.

© Lawrencealot – November 28, 2014

Visual template

Deachnadh Cummaisc

 

Sneadhbairdne

Sneadhbhairdne (sna-vuy-erd-ne):
A quatrain stanza of alternating eight syllable lines and four syllable lines with two syllable endings. Lines two and four rhyme, line three consonates with both. All words in the final line must rhyme line, the final word of line four alliterating with the preceding stressed word.

(x B) x x x x (x a)
x x (x b)
x x x x x (b c)
b b (x B)

Pasted from <http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/celtic1.html>

Sneadhbairdne (snay-vuy-erd-ne) is an ancient Irish Form seemingly overloaded with features used in direct meter.

The Sneadhbairdne is:
• stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
• syllabic 8-4-8-4 syllables per line.
• alliterated in each line.
• written with two-syllable end words in each line.
• rhymed, L2 and L4 end rhyme. L3 consonates with the rhyme.
• every stressed syllable in L4 must rhyme.
• written with cywddydd (harmony of sound) and dunadh (beginning and ending the poem with the same word, phrase or line).

x x x x x x (x x) 
x x (x A) 
x x x x x x (x a) 
x A(x A)

October by Barbara Hartman

Beware! Canyon country’s ablaze
—gold leaves galore
glow by silver streams that glisten,
storms roar, restore.

Cumulus clouds shroud the Chuskas,
people prepare
for horny hunters who declare
“Let bears beware!”

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1166
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

She’s a Tease (Sneadhbairdne)

Warning! She will keep you waiting
playing, pleasing
quite despite impatient pleading
She likes teasing.

With her wiles you’ll welcome waiting
scorning mourning.
I’ll implore you’re not ignoring
forlorn warning.

© Lawrencealot – October 9, 2014

Visual template of sorts

Sneadhbairdne

Rhupunt hir

A Rhupunt hir is merely a Rhupunt that is NOT broken into short stanzas.
 Rhupunt
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Stanzaic
Description:
(RHEE-pint) This is a syllabic line of three to five tetrasyllabic sections. It is sometimes presented as stanzas (tercets, quatrains, quintets) rather than one line. The main rhyme can change after two or more lines. The internal rhyme can be consonance instead of true rhyme.
Origin:
Welsh
Schematic:
xxxa xxxa xxxa xxxb
xxxc xxxc xxxc xxxb
xxxd xxxd xxxd xxxb, etc.
Or
xxxa xxxa xxxa xxxa xxxb
xxxc xxxc xxxc xxxc xxxb
xxxd xxxd xxxd xxxd xxxb, etc.
Or
xxxa xxxa xxxb
xxxc xxxc xxxb
xxxd xxxd xxxb, etc.
or
xxxa
xxxa
xxxa
xxxb, etc.
Thanks to Charles L. Weatherford of PoetryBase

Related Welsh Form are HERE.

Visual template
 

Cyrch Gymeriad

Earliest strata of British Celtic poetry #1: cyrch gymeriad (wreathing).
Information provided by Gary Kent Spain.
In Welsh, cymeriad (‘memory’) refers to repetition of the same word or syllable, often at the start of successive lines.  Cyrch gymeriad means what we call ‘wreathing’, that is, to repeat the word or syllable ending one line (or line segment) at or near the start of the next (see below).  It can involve meaning as well, that is, synonyms.
Your prompt is to assemble short (roughly two-stress) line segments of 3-6 syllables (mostly 3-4 if possible) into at least two longer lines (printed as stanzas) that rime on the last syllable (stressed or not), and to link each line segment with its neighbors by one (or more) of the following techniques:
1.  Cymeriad (beginning with the same word or syllable, or a homophone or synonym)
2.  Cyrch gymeriad (word or syllable repetition linking end of one with start of next)
3.  Alliteration, or consonance (repetition of two or more sounds of a word, can both be consonant sounds or one can be a vowel sound)
4.  Rimed syllable, which even should it occur at the ends of two successive line segments still constitutes ‘internal’ rime, since more than one make up the complete ‘line’ (i.e. stanza)
…again, the cymeriad may involve homophones (different words that sound the same) or synonyms, in addition to actual repetition.
Schematic, where each letter represents a syllable, x = unlinked, lower case (abc etc.) rimed, upper case (ABC etc.) repeated (cymeriad)—spaces separate words, bold and italics (alternating) indicate alliteration, and underlinedindicates a proper name.
x  A-B / B  A-c
xxx  C / C  DD
DD  EE / EE  xf
G-GG  f / G-GG  H
H  xx / f   x  xH
x  x-xx / x-x-x-h
x  xxi / x i / xx  h
Example Poem
Abalone abound
bound below to rocks;
rocked not by salty waves
but safety waived by men.
Men-selfish divers
“shell-fish dinners” served as
dining divers’ can.
Bountiful before man
manufactured gear
that fractured, broke the ban
banning air- breathing man.
Man equipped to submerge
then eclipsed by base urge-
Urgent need for meals
of otters, and seals.
Tasting abalone,
Shellfish about alone
in taste, attests to why-
Why we’ve failed fishing ban.
© Lawrencealot – July 13, 2013
I have provided a Visual Template below that shows my attempt at various linkages.
Unfortunately, I could not make this schematic fit the example poem provide, and pretty much believe it is UNREALISITIC to assume a template can be constructed since almost everything is optional, from line-length to type of linkage.

Byr a Thoddaid

Byr a Thoddaid (beer ah TOE-thy’d), one of the 24 traditional Welsh

stanza forms, consists of four lines of syllable count 10/6/8/8

(or 8/8/10/6), rimed on last syllable except for the 10-syllable line,

 which has the main rime on the 7th, 8th, or 9th syllable with the

remainder set off by dash and either rimed within the 6-syllable

line or with its sequence of consonant-sounds repeated at the

start of the 6-syllable line, as above.

 

This poem has the Cynghanedd (consonance, harmony of sound)

required of Welsh bards, as detailed here:

 

http://allpoetry.com/column/7546199-Welsh_Poetry_-_Part_I_Cynghanedd_-by-Welshbard

 

 

Specifically, all but the last line of the first stanza

and the penultimate line of the second have Cynghanedd lusg

(trailing consonance), in which the accented penultimate syllable

 of the end-word is rimed earlier in the line

(the part of each 10-syllable line after the dash being excluded);

S1L4 and S2L3, then, both have Cynghanedd groes (cross-consonance),

 in which the second part of the line repeats the sequence of

consonant sounds in the first (end of last syllable of either

sequence can be ignored, as can n, while w and y the Welsh treat as vowels).

 

 

This form makes use of the gair cyrch in which the main rhyme appears somewhere near the end of a longer line and the end word is a secondary rhyme. The secondary rhyme is then echoed by alliteration or assonance in the first half of the next line.

  • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains made up of 2 couplets,

  • syllabic, either L1-L2 8 syllables, L3 10 syllables L4 6 syllables, or the couplets are reversed L1 10 syllables, L2 6 syllables, L3-L4 8 syllables.

  • rhymed, either aaba with the main rhyme A occurring somewhere near the end of L3 and the secondary rhyme b echoed by alliteration or assonance in the first half of L4 or the couplets are reversed baaa.

 

 Potential

I know that my life’s potent– gauged not small–
gives notice of quotient
believed not achieved to extent
that make it thus, this man’s intent .

Say I, one day still invent– mankind’s balm–
Might call on all unspent
forces of mine formerly misspent
then would I feel good and content?

©  Lawrencealot – June 29,2012

Authors’s Notes

This poem has the Cynghanedd (consonance, harmony of sound)

required of Welsh bards, as detailed here:

Specifically, all but the last line of the first stanza
and the penultimate line of the second have Cynghanedd lusg
(trailing consonance), in which the accented penultimate syllable
 of the end-word is rimed earlier in the line
(the part of each 10-syllable line after the dash being excluded);
S1L4 and S2L3, then, both have Cynghanedd groes (cross-consonance),
 in which the second part of the line repeats the sequence of
consonant sounds in the first (end of last syllable of either
sequence can be ignored, as can n, while w and y the Welsh treat as vowels).
Please note the correction suggested in the comments below and navigate there
for a fuller treatment of this form.

This correction by Gary Kent Spain, aka, Venicebard on Allpoetry.

You might want to alter the Cynghanedd part of your AN here (lifted from one of my poems, which is okay except it is inaccurate with respect to your poem) to reflect the slightly looser form of Cynghanedd Groes (and echoing of the gair cyrch) you have aimed for in this poem.  The following link gives for C. Groes the stipulation that all that is necessary is repetition of the initial consonants of words, which is close to what you’ve tried to do here:

 

Related Welch form at HERE.

 

Visual Template of sorts
Byr a Thoddaid

Rannaigheacht bheag (ran-á-yah voig)

A traditional Irish quatrain of 7-syllable lines [7/7/7/7] (‘old-school’),
 or 8/6/8/6, ending in 2-syllable words all linked by consonance
(in its old meaning, ‘having the same vowels’),
 with at least two cross-rimes in each couplet
 (can be consonance in first but should be rime in second)
and alliteration in every line, which in the second couplet
 must be between the last two stressed words in each line,
and with the dunedh, of course (ending in the same word, phrase,
 or line it began with).
Poem ExampleRon-a’yach Rhyme

Writing rhyming words, giving
living lines, fit for fighting
biting boredom while living
in style with witty writing.

(c) Lawrencealot – May 16,2012

Visual Template
As with the other Irish forms, a template can show you the syllable count and a bit more, but cannot be definitive as so much variation is possible while meeting the formal  requirements.
In the example below some words not hi-lighted could have been as serving one or more rules.