Dionol

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

 

The Dionol created by Dion O’Donnell is another exercise in meter. This form employs a rentrament which is the repetition of a phrase from one line as a line elsewhere in the poem. 

The Dionol is:
an octave with a rentrament as an added line, the last phrase of L2 is repeated as L9.
metered, iambic pentameter with L9 iambic trimeter.
abcddcbab.

xx xx xx xx xa
xx xx rr rr rb
xx xx xx xx xc
xx xx xx xx xd
xx xx xx xx xd
xx xx xx xx xc
xx xx xx xx xb
xx xx xx xx xa
rr rr rb
 

Pasted from  http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Repayment (Dionol)

My happiness is not just mine to keep
I borrowed it, and loans must be repaid.
I borrowed it from dogs and cats and trees,
and jokes from friends and smiles from passers-by
and books I’ve read and flowers, creeks, and sky.
I’m never left without, for by degrees
each offering to others that I’ve made
have brought me more and set me more at ease,
and loans must be repaid.

© Lawrencealot – Septembet 8, 2014

 

Visual template

 Dionol

Kyrielle Hymn

Kyrielle Hymn is a recent stanzaic form that is a variation of the 16th century, English Hymnal Measure. From the name, one could assume this American invented form was a variation of the Middle Ages verse form theKyrielle. But, the only thing it has in common with the Kyrielle is they both have a refrain. 

The Kyrielle Hymn is:
○ lyrical.
○ stanzaic, written in any number of cinquains.
○ metered, L1,L3,L5 iambic tetrameter, L2,L4 iambic trimeter.
○ composed with refrain, the 5th line of each stanza is a refrain.
○ rhyme, rhyme scheme ababR cdcdR etc. R being the refrain which need not rhyme with other end words in the stanza.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/1197-forms-found-at-poetry-basepoetry-gnosis/

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

_____

Kyrielle Hymn
Type: Structure, Metrical Requirement, Repetitive Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Stanzaic
Description: A hymnal stanza with appended one line iambic tetrameter refrain.
Origin: American
Schematic: ababR cdcdR, etc.

Rhythm:

xX xX xX xX
xX xX xX
xX xX xX xX
xX xX xX
xX xX xX xX
Rhythm/Stanza Length: 5

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/001/161.shtml

My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

My example poem

Choose Up Sides ( Kyrielle Hymn)

“If one could reason with a fool
would fools cease to exsist?
If men used logic as their tool
would group-thought still persist?
I ask you that rhetorically.”

“Do some require a membership
to validate their worth,
must they be cleansed with bunk sheep-dip*
by groups upon this earth?”
I ask you that rhetorically.”

“Once one has chosen sides or teams
they measure outside folk
as being enemies, it seems.
Does that seem like a joke?
I ask you that rhetorically.”

© Lawrencealot – August 20,2012

*sheep dip also see sheep-dip
n.  Any of various preparations of liquid disinfectant into which sheep are dipped to destroy parasites and to clean their wool, especially before shearing.

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Kyrielle Hymn

Swinburne 7776

This is an octain form patterned on Algernon Charles Swinburne’s “Before Dawn.”

I simply named this form after it’s syllable pattern since Swinburne created several distinct octave forms.

It is:

Stanzaic: consisting of any number of octains.

Metered: Iambic Trimeter.

Rhyme pattern: aaabcccb, where only the b-rhymes are masculine.

Before Dawn by Algernon Charles Swinburne

SWEET LIFE, if life were stronger,

Earth clear of years that wrong her,

Then two things might live longer,

Two sweeter things than they;

Delight, the rootless flower,

And love, the bloomless bower;

Delight that lives an hour,

And love that lives a day.

From evensong to daytime,

When April melts in Maytime,

Love lengthens out his playtime,

Love lessens breath by breath,

And kiss by kiss grows older

On listless throat or shoulder

Turned sideways now, turned colder

Than life that dreams of death.

This one thing once worth giving

Life gave, and seemed worth living;

Sin sweet beyond forgiving

And brief beyond regret:

To laugh and love together

And weave with foam and feather

And wind and words the tether

Our memories play with yet.

Ah, one thing worth beginning,

One thread in life worth spinning,

Ah sweet, one sin worth sinning

With all the whole soul’s will;

To lull you till one stilled you,

To kiss you till one killed you,

To feed you till one filled you,

Sweet lips, if love could fill;

To hunt sweet Love and lose him

Between white arms and bosom,

Between the bud and blossom,

Between your throat and chin;

To say of shame—what is it?

Of virtue—we can miss it;

Of sin—we can but kiss it,

And it’s no longer sin:

To feel the strong soul, stricken

Through fleshly pulses, quicken

Beneath swift sighs that thicken,

Soft hands and lips that smite;

Lips that no love can tire,

With hands that sting like fire,

Weaving the web Desire

To snare the bird Delight.

But love so lightly plighted,

Our love with torch unlighted,

Paused near us unaffrighted,

Who found and left him free;

None, seeing us cloven in sunder,

Will weep or laugh or wonder;

Light love stands clear of thunder,

And safe from winds at sea.

As, when late larks give warning

Of dying lights and dawning,

Night murmurs to the morning,

“Lie still, O love, lie still;”

And half her dark limbs cover

The white limbs of her lover,

With amorous plumes that hover

And fervent lips that chill;

As scornful day represses

Night’s void and vain caresses,

And from her cloudier tresses

Unwinds the gold of his,

With limbs from limbs dividing

And breath by breath subsiding;

For love has no abiding,

But dies before the kiss;

So hath it been, so be it;

For who shall live and flee it?

But look that no man see it

Or hear it unaware;

Lest all who love and choose him

See Love, and so refuse him;

For all who find him lose him,

But all have found him fair.

Pasted from <http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/before-dawn-7/>

My example poem

Putting Decorum Before ‘Em (Swinburne 7776)

I turned and saw you staring
and knew you were comparing
my dress with girls more daring
than shyness lets me be.
Some say my clothes are fusty,
well it’s because I’m busty
and seem to make men lusty
when there’s too much to see.

While I’m too shy for posing
and chesty flesh exposing
I find myself supposing
that I could test the guys.
I’ll lean across the table
like Greta did with Gable
and see if you are able
to look me in the eyes.

© Lawrencealot – July 31, 2014

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Swinburne 7776

 

The de Tabley

• The de Tabley is a verse form patterned after Chorus from Medea by John Leicester Warren, Lord de Tabley (1835-1895). De Tabley’s poetry reflected his study of the classics and his passion for detail.

The de Tabley is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
○ metric, alternating iambic pentameter and iambic trimeter lines. L1 of each stanza begins with a trochee
○ rhymed, rhymed scheme abab cdcd etc.

Chorus from Medea by John Leicester Warren, Lord de Tabley

SWEET are the ways of death to weary feet,
Calm are the shades of men.
The phantom fears no tyrant in his seat,
The slave is master then.

Love is abolish’d; well, that this is so;
We knew him best as Pain.
The gods are all cast out, and let them go!
Who ever found them gain?

Ready to hurt and slow to succour these;
So, while thou breathest, pray.
But in the sepulchre all flesh has peace;
Their hand is put away.

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668>
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the fine PMO resource.

My example poem

An Old Man’s Dog (The de Tably)

Fate had to play a part in bringing you
looking at pups that day.
Your wife thought it was something fun to do,
and thus you said okay.

Tiny, and still unsteady on my feet,
knowing we had a fit,
I curled up in your hand and felt complete.
How soon you did commit!

Less than a minute passed before we knew
we’d be each other’s pride.
The bond, so evident twixt me and you,
the kennel-master cried.

Never was I an incidental pet
Not just a thing or toy;
We taught each other and we’re learning yet,
thus multiplying joy.

Chewing on shoes is part of puppyhood
and I did spoil one pair.
You said, “Bad dog!” to me, then like you should
hid them from me somewhere.

Bad Dog! became a phrase without a smile
warning me to change my ways.
Those words I haven’t heard now for a while;
I try to earn your praise.

Likely I’ll live until you die my friend.
I’ll miss you every day
and dream of you each night until my end.
I hope it works that way.

Should I become so ill I cannot cope
please take me to the vet.
That in your arms I pass, remains my hope;
just give me one more pet.

© Lawrencealot – June 27, 2014

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The de Tabley

The Arnold

The Arnold is a stanzaic pattern that links stanzas with rhyme. It is named for English poet Matthew Arnold (1822-1888) and patterned after his poem The Hymn of Empedocles. Arnold was actually better known for writing the classic Dover Beach.

The Arnold is:
• stanzaic, written in any even number of cinquains.
• metered, L1 through L4 are trimeter, L5 is hexameter.
• rhymed. L1 through L4 are alternating rhyme, L5 rhymes with line 5 of the next stanza. The L5 rhyme changes every 2 stanzas. Rhyme scheme: ababc dedec fgfgh ijijh etc.
• L1 through L4 are indented 9 spaces. Now that is getting specific.
The Hymn of Empedocles by Mathew Arnold

IS it so small a thing
To have enjoy’d the sun,
To have lived light in the spring,
To have loved, to have thought, to have done;
To have advanced true friends, and beat down baffling foes;

That we must feign a bliss
Of doubtful future date,
And while we dream on this
Lose all our present state,
And relegate to worlds yet distant our repose?

Not much, I know, you prize
What pleasures may be had,
Who look on life with eyes
Estranged, like mine, and sad:
And yet the village churl feels the truth more than you;

Who ‘s loth to leave this life
Which to him little yields:
His hard-task’d sunburnt wife,
His often-labour’d fields;
The boors with whom he talk’d, the country spots he knew

But thou, because thou hear’st
Men scoff at Heaven and Fate;
Because the gods thou fear’st
Fail to make blest thy state,
Tremblest, and wilt not dare to trust the joys there are.

I say, Fear not! life still
Leaves human effort scope.
But, since life teems with ill,
Nurse no extravagant hope.
Because thou must not dream, thou need’st not then despair.
Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668>

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the fine PMO resource.

My Example poem

Jar of Coins (The Arnold)

Jar of Coins

The coins are waiting now
in a five gallon jar.
They were not spent somehow
so that is where they are –
received as change when bread or milk was bought one day.

Those coins would not be missed
for times were not that bad.
coin hoarding would persist.
Someday I might be glad.
For years and years the coins joined others put away.

The economic tide
made metal prices race.
Some coins that rest inside
are worth more than their face.
That jar became a rock against emergency.

That heavy bottle seems
too much for me to lift.
It’s for my grandson’s dreams,
I plan it for a gift.
Bequeathing him some jingle, left unused by me.

© Lawrencealot – June 12, 2014
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The Arnold

Brain Strain Refrain

During my first two years on Allpoetry it became obvious that one of, if not the most utilized new form was Jan Turner’s Trijan Refrain. To honor it, and simultaneously give a poet a vehicle for a weightier topic, with more flexibility I created, what I now consider an ill-advised form which in a contest was given the name San Gabriel Refrain. I consider it ill-advised because it has too much flexibility and therefore is fine as a writing exercise, but loses it’s identity as a recognizable form. It has one more line than the venerable TR, the first line need not be repeated in each stanza, and the refrain may be taken from one line and repeated, be multiple refrains taken from any of the longer lines. Later, I amended the specs to allow iambic pentameter, further diluting the form identity.
I am now of the opinion that a new form should be identifiable, and that all deviations from the specific requirements be simply up to the poet’s discretion.

There comes now a newer form created by Allan Emery, aka Joe King on Allpoetry which has a unique identity, with one fewer lines than the TR, but with no stanza limit, or line one repetition requirement.

I have interpreted the specifications as:
It is stanzaic, consisting of any number of septets
It is syllabic: 8/8/8/8/4/4/8
It is rhymed: aabbccb
It requires the first half of L3 to be a repeated refrain as lines 5 and 6
It is metric, writing in iambic tetrameter/dimeter.

I proposed the name of this form to be the Bastard Refrain and ran an Allpoetry contest.  The participation was slight, and some thought it was because the name put off some, so it has been re-christened the Brain Strain Refrain.

My example poem:

Lifted (Brain Strain Refrain)

Her wings are hidden but they’re there
beneath her golden locks of hair
unseen by men who walk this earth,
who note her happiness and mirth.
Unseen by men –
unseen by men
though all of them can see her worth.

Those wings extend to touch my mind
and when our thoughts are so combined
We fly to heights reserved for few.
I’m blessed by being loved by you.
We fly to heights;
We fly to heights
while other people have no clue.

© Lawrencealot – June 3, 2014
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Bastard Refrain

Streambed’s Ripple poetry form

Streambed’s Ripple a form created by Lisa Morris known as Streambed on Allpoetry.com

It is:

Stanzaic: Written in 3 ten line stanzas

Syllabic: 10/8/10/8/10/10/10/8/10/8

Refrain:  Requires the last half of L5 to repeat in each stanza

Rhymed: xaxaBbxaxa xcxcBbxcxc xdxdBbxdxd

Metric: Written in iambic tetrameter and iambic trimeter

 

Example poem

Love’s Corset     (Streambed’s Ripple)

For centuries we have believed
the attributes of form
as they relate to motherhood
ought be considered norm.
So bind yourself with stays and lace
before you paint or rouge your face.
For parturition hips must be
expanded, round and warm.
The breasts to suckle one or more
are ample to conform.
A standard then however wrought
in western cultures seem
to drive the fashion engines to
promote this female scheme.
So women then with stays and lace
constrict themselves so men will chase.
But girls have found and boys have too
that essence reigns supreme,
and being kind and being true
is what will fuel love’s dream.
Once one is found to share your heart,
then regulate your mind
and recognize that devotion
provides the stays that bind.
I’ll bind my love with stays and lace
to make sure romance stays in place
and corset non-complying thoughts
and set them far behind.
For nothing fits the human soul
like lovers so aligned.

© Lawrencealot – April 19, 2014

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Swinburne Decastitch

This form combining the rhyming pattern of an interrupted Petrachan Sonnet, with the breathing  cadence of common meter may have somewhere been used before, but it was definitely used and captured for us by Algernon Charles Swinburne in his “A Ballad of Death”.
I merely record it here and give it a name by which we can refer as we attempt to write such poems of our own.
It is stanzaic, consisting of any number of stanzas.
It is Syllabic: 10/10/6/10/10/10/6/10/10/10
It is Rhymed: abbacdecde
It is composed in iambic meter.
Example Poem
Cultural Patrimony     (Swinburne Decastitch)
When any culture deems it right to maul
and kill, inflicting pain, can you explain
away my great disdain?
Can you excuse the citizens and all
who legislate and rule who use as tool
the very worst impulses of man’s mind?
Against such things let’s rail!
We simply cannot fool ourselves- it’s cruel
to torment any species that we find.
With that in mind I’d like to tell this tale.
Young boys are often wooed by danger’s taunt
and while still teens endeavor to learn skills
to please the crowds with thrills.
‘Tis machismo alone that these boys flaunt,
and doubtlessly they want to earn the fame
accruing to the greatest in this “sport”
so fam’lies can be proud.
And many boys who play this dangerous game
will end up lame or have their life cut short
where death and torture’s commonly allowed.
In training some are killed or truly maimed.
and never set their feet into bull’s ring.
This is an honored thing!
But culture failing still persists unnamed,
where people think this cost perhaps is small;
and small it well may be when men have learned
compassion has no role.
If humankind is not herewith appalled
by acts dispensing pain where it’s unearned
each man accepts canker on his soul.
When man pits bull against a lion foe,
again to entertain and titillate,
we each should fee self-hate.
The gladiator games we must outgrow,
like burning ants and pulling off fly’s wings.
Each species may do harsh things to survive.
But evil has its cost.
When man accepts it’s right to torture things
which share our space and roam our earth alive,
compassion for all life will soon be lost.
© Lawrencealot – April 13, 2014
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Soft-Songed Tercet

Soft-Songed Tercet
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Other Requirement, Simple
Description:
This form has four requirements.
  1. It is iambic.
  2. The schema is:xxxxxa
    xxxxxbxxxxxb
    xxxxxa
  3. There must be an unusual image or turn of phrase.
  4. It must have a soft feel to it.
There is also a multi-stanza form called the soft-songed triplet.
Schematic:
Rhyme/Syllable:
xxxxxa
xxxxxbxxxxxb
xxxxxa
Meter:
xX xX xX
Thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for the wonderful resource.
  • Soft Songed Tercet is an invented verse form found at Poetry Base that has an unusual request, the verse must have a “soft feel”.The Soft Songed Tercet is:
    • a tristich, a poem in 3 lines. When written in more than one tercet the form is oddly named the Soft Songed Triplet. (“Tercet” is 3 line unit as is a “triplet”, both of which can be written in any number within a poem. The words are often used interchangeably however, the classic English “triplet” is usually monorhymed. So technically the name Soft Songed Tercet properly should apply to both a single tristich or the stanzaic form of any number of tercets.)
    • metered, iambic, L1 &L3 are trimeter, L2 is hexameter.
    • rhymed, rhymed a(bb)a L2 has internal rhyme.
    • composed with an unusual image.
    • composed with a “soft feel”.
      x x x x x a
      x x x x x b x x x x x b
      x x x x x a
       

      Furry Fix by jvgSilky fluff warms my palm
      as I cup a small plump rabbit waiting to jump
      free. Its fine fur a balm.

Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource.
Example Poem
Fluppet
So fluffy I’ve been made
I’ll bring your daughter joy – become her favorite toy,
she’ll never be afraid.
© Lawrencealot – February 6, 2014
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Ballad

A short narrative poem with stanzas of two or four lines and usually a refrain. The story of a ballad can originate from a wide range of subject matter but most frequently deals with folk-lore or popular legends.

They are written in straight-forward verse, seldom with detail, but always with graphic simplicity and force. Most ballads are suitable for singing and, while sometimes varied in practice, are generally written in ballad meter, or common meter, i.e., alternating lines of iambic tetrameter and iambic trimeter, with the last words of the second and fourth lines rhyming. (xaxa)

 

Example Poem

Part of a composite poem called
Loves Lost

When cancer took my mom away
I wished it had been me.
Yet Johnnie’s pain was just the same,
that anyone could see.

I took the emo route and thought
I’d maybe end my life.
Then Johnny took up guiding reins
no longer held by wife.

He brought me back from self-abuse
and stopped me being wild.
He gave me strength and sound advice
a mother gives her child.

He told me my virginity
was not for common guys;
it was a one-time gift to give
to true love as a prize.

“To honor your mom, succeed now
and in your coming life.”
He cared for me relentlessly
while having now no wife.

My love for Jonny, grew with me,
(for I’d begun to bloom.)
I fantasized about my  “dad”
when lonely in my room.

He was a “hunk” my girl-friends thought.
I’d always shared that view.
Two hundred pounds of sculptured male
and standing six-foot-two.

My want was such I had to touch
his beauty every day.
I’d accidently show down blouse
and make my cute butt sway.

And when I’d sit upon his lap
before “goodnights” were said,
I’d feel him grow and I would know,
what he would do in bed.

Then one warm summer day instead
of sitting I just rode
his leg.  It was spontaneous
and caused me to explode.

His want was clear, but one lone tear
I saw roll down his face.
He thought accepting offered gift
would be his life’s disgrace.

We talked and hugged and he held
me closely while he said,
“My sweetheart Ann, when you’re eight-teen
I think that we should wed.

© Lawrencealot – November 10, 2012