Tableau

      • The Tableau is an invented stanzaic form that paints a single image in keeping with the name of the form, tableau meaning picture. Created byEmily Romano who suggests the word “tableau” be included in the title. The Tableau is:
        • stanzaic, written in any number of sixains.
        • isosyllabic, 5 syllable lines.
        • rhyme at the discretion of the poet.
        • written describing a single image.
        • written with a title that includes the word “tableau”.
With thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful PMO resource.

I changed syllabic above to
      • isosyllabic 5 syllable lines, indicating all lines are the same length.

The Tableau, a poetry form created by Emily Romano in October of 2008, consists of one or more verses, each having six lines. Each line should have five beats (syllables). There is no set rhyme scheme, although rhyme may be present. The title should contain the word tableau.
Write one stanza only.
Since the dictionary states the word tableau means picture or representation, the poem should reflect this. A picture should come to mind as the poem is read.

example:
Graveside Tableau
Sunlight cannot warm
The corpse of the bairn
Who drowned in the loch;
Stoic the father,
Silent the mother,
While a spinster weeps
Copyright © 2008 Emily Romano
My Example Poem
The Sting Tableau
Her felicity
and non-verbal cues
were evocative;
when his cash came out
then so did her badge.
© Lawrencealot – August 21, 2013

Le Jeune

The Le Jeune Form:

Invented by Barb_Brown of Allpoetry.
Three to five  six line stanzas, where each line has 5 syllables
Each stanza is 6 lines
All lines are 5 syllables
Internal mono-rhyme at syllable 2 in lines 2 and 4 throughout the poem.
The Final word in each stanza is the same word, and must rhyme with the other mono-end-rhymes.
No meter required.

–  Three to five stanzas
–  Each stanza is 6 lines
–  All lines are isosyllabic – 5 syllables
Rhyme notes with parenthetic words from example:
1.  L2 and L4, W2 (a) in all stanzas rhymes (seen, mean, deem, etc.)
2.  L2 and L4, last word (b) in all stanzas rhymes (dismay, displays, gray, etc.).
3.  L6, W3 (c) in all stanzas rhymes (ease, please, seize)
4.  L6, last word (d) in all stanzas is the same word and must rhyme with #2 above. (day)

This example should help clarify:

Now!

Of hope comes much risk,
as seen in dismay.
Are you filled with shock,
so mean, these displays?
Gather all your wits
then to ease the day.

Of being human,
what deem you of gray?
Have you had thoughts of
odd schemes meant to stray?
Waste not a moment
then to please the day.

Of the dark of night,
in dreams do you stay?
Hide not in fear there,
nor demean your ways.
Draw on courage now,
then to seize the day!

by Barb Brown

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Octameter

Octameter, created by Shelley A. Cephas,
is a poem made up of 16 lines
divided into two stanzas of 8 lines each.
Each line has a syllable count of 5.
The set rhyme scheme is: abcdedfd ghcgigdd  (abcdedfdghcgigdd)
I found this form defined on Shadow Poetry.
Of all the poetry forms I have studied none has been affixed with a more misleading and potentially confusing name.
Example Poem

T-aint Octameter  (Octameter)

Most mis-named form seen–
the Octameter.
That’s a standard line
length measured in feet.
I ambs, trochees, such
which decide the beat.
Confusing girth with
length was not too neat.

It’s an octastitch.
Can’t quarrel at all.
If this form were mine
There’d be a name switch.
Say.. an octapent;
gone the need to bitch.
Current name is scat,
Cephas should fix that.

© Februrary 5, 2013

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