Dodoitsu

Dodoistu is a Japanese form of poetry that is sometimes performed as a folk song. The Dodoitsu comes from the old agricultural roots of the Gombei, the people of Japan’s back-country. The majority of Dodoistu poetry was handed down through oral tradition and was performed to the accompaniment of shamisen, a three- stringed instrument.

A lot of Dodoistu poetry focuses on love, humor or the unexpected, though there are many Dodoistu poems that also look at nature and beauty.

It has 26 syllables: 7 in the first, second and third lines, and 5 in the last line. (7/7/7/5).

Example Poem

‘Tis Better…   (A Dodoistu)

All triumphs end differently,
some with flourish and refrains,
some with frequent curtain calls,
others fade to black.

© Lawrencealot – Oct. 19, 2012

Visual Template

Haiku

HAIKU is both singular and plural.

A Japanese form designed to be small and concise by limiting the number of lines and the number of syllables in a line. Japanese haiku are three-line poems with the first and the third line having five syllables and the middle having seven syllables. English-language Haiku may be shorter than seventeen syllables, though some poets prefer to keep to the 5-7-5 format.

A true is much more than a poem is 5-7-5 format.

• Use concise, simple and clear language
• Write in two sections, using a fragment and a phrase
• Use sense images, in particular what you see or hear
• Write in the present tense
• Compare or contrast two different images as juxtapositions
• Try to include a seasonal reference
• Write in 17 syllables or less, preferably between 8-12
• Use minimal (if any) punctuation
• Try to make your haiku open-ended and evocative
• Try not make judgments or express your opinions
• Limit your use of adjectives and try not to use adverbs
• Do not use rhyme, simile, metaphor or personification
• There is no need for capital letters, except for proper nouns

And there are many Haiku knock-offs:

Example Poems

voluptuous wife approaches –
low-cut gown
perfume excites

dog on lap
puppy barks –
two dogs on lap

(c) Lawrencealot –

Lanturne or Lanterne

The Lanturne is a verse of 5 lines shaped like a Japanese
lantern with a syllabic pattern of 1/2/3/4/1.

Must be Centered

Example Poem

Some Lanturnes

One
Two, Three
Look at me.
What do you see?
Me.

Lit
Lantern
Summons some
Nighttime flying
Moths.

Long
leggy
lasses love
lecherous lads’
looks.

Wife
kisses
husband who
is most happy
man.

© Lawrencealot – April, 2012

 

Note I have found both spellings widely used:

lanturne = Poetscornerblog, poemhunter, Shadowpoetry
lanterne = Wikipeidia, poetrymagnumopus, poetrysoup

Sedoka

The Sedoka is an unrhymed poem made up of two three-line katauta
 with the following syllable counts: 5/7/7, 5/7/7.
A Sedoka, pair of katauta as a single poem,
may address the same subject from differing perspectives.
Katauta is an unrhymed three-line poem with
the following syllable counts: 5/7/7.

Example Poem
Getting Trained

Baby learning speech
“Lo, Papa”, points down to floor.
I look for object on floor.

“No, grandpa”, say mom.
The baby wants you closer
She wants you to “Stand there please.”