Brace Octave

Brace Octave
Type:
Structure, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Stanzaic
Description:
An eight-line stanzaic form with rhyme of abbaabba or abbacddc. No requirements on meter or length. The Italian octave is a subgenre of this.
Origin:
English
Schematic:
abbaabba or abbacddc
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
8
See Also:
Status:
Incomplete
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his fine Poetrybase resource.
Brace Octave ——————————————
The Brace Octave has its roots in music. The brace is the wavey symbol that joins 2 staffs of music, indicating that both scores are played simultaneously. The verse form referred to as the Brace Octave is a lyrical blend of meter and rhyme, the rhyme scheme almost taking the shape of the brace. It could even be said that the octave itself acts as a brace joining two envelope quatrains.
The Brace Octave is:
  • stanzaic, written in any number of octaves (8 lines) made up of 2 envelope quatrains. When writing more than one octave, even numbered stanzas grouped in twos seems to fit best with the venue of the form.
  • metric, iambic tetrameter. Some sources indicate no meter necessary but given the musical nature of the verse, it seems to me measured lines are appropriate if not a prerequisite. The best known poem utilizing the Brace Octave is Two Songs from a Play by W.B. Yeats which is written in iambic tetrameter so I guess Mr. Yeats agrees with me.
  • rhymed, with an envelope rhyme scheme abbacddc (see it does sort of look like a brace lying down.)
    Here is 
    William Butler Yeats’ poem which was published in his book The Towerin 1928. There is a footnote from Yeats “These songs were sung by musicians in my play Resurrection.”
Two Songs from a Play by William Butler Yeats
I
I saw a staring virgin stand
Where holy Dionysus died,
And tear the heart out of his side.
And lay the heart upon her hand
And bear that beating heart away;
Of Magnus Annus at the spring,
And then did all the Muses sing
As though God’s death were but a play.
Another Troy must rise and set,
Another lineage feed the crow,
Another Argo’s painted prow
Drive to a flashier bauble yet.
The Roman Empire stood appalled:
It dropped the reins of peace and war
When that fierce virgin and her Star
Out of the fabulous darkness called.
II
In pity for man’s darkening thought
He walked that room and issued thence
In Galilean turbulence;
The Babylonian starlight brought
A fabulous, formless darkness in;
Odour of blood when Christ was slain
Made all platonic tolerance vain
And vain all Doric discipline.
Everything that man esteems
Endures a moment or a day.
Love’s pleasure drives his love away,
The painter’s brush consumes his dreams;
The herald’s cry, the soldier’s tread
Exhaust his glory and his might:
Whatever flames upon the night
Man’s own resinous heart has fed.
My thanks to Judy Van Gorder from PMO for the above.  I
 tend to agree with her conceptually about the meter and line length, but many do not.  Below is a poem that strays from isosyllabic lines and abandons consistent meter.
~Love Is Not Just  A State Of Mind~
(Brace Octave)
Love is a very beautiful feeling
Can make you sappy or happy
And at times can give you  healing
Sometimes makes us so unhappy
You reach the stars or hit the ceiling
Emotions makes us  sad or happy
Love is not just a state of mind
For in your heart love you can find
Dorian Petersen Potter
aka ladydp2000
copyright@2011
My example poem
Short Shrift    (Brace Octave)
I tell ya friend
it’s quite okay
to write this way
or else append
sounds to extend
the word array
with more to say
from start to end.
© Lawrencealot – April 20, 2014
Although I do believe that more pleasant poetry results from utilizing meter and a consistent line length of iambic tetrameter or longer, I have to allow any octave using envelope rhyme to be tagged with this name.
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Chaucerian Roundel

Chaucerian Roundel
The Chaucerian roundel was developed by (obviously) Chaucer from (less obviously) the rondel rather than the roundel – not that there’s a huge amount of difference.  This example is dedicated to the Athenian gentleman who, in an e-mail, described my website as a “labor of love” (yes, it was Athens, Georgia). 

Ambition 

I’d like to do this all the time.
It doesn’t pay, but I confess
I love my day job rather less.
I’m tiring of the search for rhyme
And reason in life’s heaving mess.
I’d like to do this all the time.
A poet’s life must be sublime.
Those lucky few the gods would bless
Breathe only poetry. Oh yes,
I’d like to do this all the time.
 

As with the rondel etc, there is a refrain, the first line being repeated at the end of the second and third stanzas. The rhyming scheme is Abb; abA; abbA, (AbbabAabbA) where the capital A’s denote the repetition of entire lines. No particular line length or metre is required.
My Thanks to Bob Newman for the wonderful resources at Volecentral.
The Chaucerian Roundel is closer to the French Rondel than the English Roundel. It is named for its originator Geoffrey Chaucer who has been said to write his Knight’s tale in the roundel, the rondel and the rondeau (take your pick). This verse form was found at Vol Central
The Chaucerian Roundel is:
  • a decastich, made up of 2 tercets followed by a quatrain.
  • written in no particular line length or meter although the form is often written in lines of equal length. Iambic tetrameter or pentameter lines are common.
  • rhymed Abb abA abbA , the A is a refrain.
  • composed with a refrain; L1 is repeated as a refrain in L6 and L10.
Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/667-chaucerian-roundel/>(line length optional, meter optional)

My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO.
My Example Poem
Could Be     (Chaucerian Roundel)
Could be our troubles are a state of mind,
could be that they’re imposed and very real,
like acts of God that man cannot appeal.
But social troubles I suspect you’ll find
depend to great extent on how you feel,
could be our troubles are a state of mind.
If one decides to leave ones woes behind
and acts accordingly with honest zeal
he’ll find that other’s slights are no big deal;
could be our troubles are a state of mind.
© Lawrencealot – February 12, 2014
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(note: although line length and meter are not required,
  this is set up for iambic pentameter)

Sheshire

Sheshire
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Isosyllabic, Pivot Requirement
Description:
A poem based on six-line verses with a closing couplet. Here are Chuck’s rules:
  1. The Sheshire is comprised of three stanzas of 6 lines with a rhyme scheme of either ABABAB or ABCABC. Completed by a rhymed couplet.
  2. Each line has the same number of syllables. The one exception to this is the last line, which may have up to six additional syllables. The additional syllables must a phrase that is set aside (by parenthesis or dashes, for example). If this aside is removed, the correct syllable count would be there and the line would remain a reasonable sentence.
  3. Each stanza should have a shift in tone. The ending couplet should leave the reader (or at least the poet) with a grin. It can be a darkly ironic grin, but a grin, nonetheless.
The derivation is from the Hebrew words shesh and shir or shira meaning six poem.
Attributed to:
Charles David Lipsig
Origin:
American (Jewish)
Schematic:
Rhyme: ababab or abcabc
Total schema:
ababab cdcdcd efefef gg or
abcabc defdef ghighi jj
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
6
Line/Poem Length:
20
Examples:
Status:
Incomplete
See Also:
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for the wonderful resource quoted. 
  • The Sheshire is an invented verse form by Jewish-American poet Charles David Lipsig found at Poetry BaseThe name comes from Hebrew six=shesh and poem=shir.The Sheshire is:
    • a poem of 20 lines made up of 3 sixains followed by a couplet.
    • isosyllabic except the last line which includes the same # of syllables as the previous lines plus a finishing phrase separated from the base line by caesura.
    • rhymed, rhyme scheme ababab cdcdcd efefef gg or abcabc defdef ghighi jj.
    • composed with a pivot or change of tone from stanza to stanza and ends with a note of irony.
 My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource quoted. 
 
 
Example Poem
Shovel Snow (Sheshire)

When I was only nine or ten
and winter’s chilly nights dumped snow,
I loved to help my daddy then
We’d bundle up, he’d say, “Let’s go!”
Together, we two working men
would scrape and push and scoop and throw.

Into my teens I found it paid
to take my shovel- make the rounds
to work for those who were dismayed
how quickly that white stuff abounds.
While others in their warm homes stayed
I worked with scraping, grunting sounds.

I had no sons to share the task.
Our drive was shaded by our house;
“Please clean the walk,” my wife would ask.
Of course one ought to please one’s spouse
so covered up, and with ski-mask
I worked. It did no good to grouse.

Retired and lazy now I nap
or read or watch my football game. (Let teens now do that crap!)

© Lawrencealot – February 2, 2014

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Tri-Duet

This form was created by Willam J. Reed IV, writing on Allpoetry as BluesMan.The author provided no other specifications than that the poem must consist of six or more tercets, but in his sample poem the first two lines were shorter than the third.

Rhyme pattern aab ccb dde ffe ggh iif

For my template I have use tri-meter and tetrameter, generally iambic.

THIS IS NOT A NEW rhyme pattern but merely a treatment of either the Alouette, or the form we call the Bush Ballad Meter. Both of which use the same rhyme pattern and line length differentiation, but in sestets as opposed to tercets.

Example Poem
Reverting (Tri-Duet)

My days are fulfilling
and though I am willing
to venture to new avenues,

if they should prove boring
and not worth exploring
my effort you must then excuse.

Not wanting to slight you-
with hopes to delight you,
I’ll manifest meter I think.

This form sings with a beat
that I find rather neat
so I’ll try to not make this stink.

When each day I awake
I say “Oh heaven’s sake!
I’ve found a new form to be learned”.

If writing in meter
results in defeat or
I fail in my try- still I yearned.

© Lawrencealot – January 14, 2014

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Wordflair

Wordflair is a refrain form invented by -Lilac_Thoughts- of Allpoetry.
Stanzas…minimum of two, maximum of five -(crown)
Six lines per stanza.
Line…1 ONE SINGLE WORD…to convey mood and theme
Lines… 1, 2, 3, 4, rhyming scheme: abab
Lines… 5 and 6 is a rhyming couplet: cC
Line six of the first stanza is repeated in the last line of following stanzas.

Note:  Although a specific Line length and meter are NOT requirement, they  are not prohibited.

Here is an example by the author:
~ Poetry Bluebird ~
…Friend…
he flew into my life from out of the blue
a gifted poet whose works I’d recommend
A handsome little bird breezed right through
with a song in his heart he soared so bright
carrying a radiance of sapphire skies upon wings in flight
…Pain…
he’s suffered the loss of a chick from his nest
but true bluebird style he’d never complain
Perched among blossoms, he’d say he was blessed
darting above rainbows with poems to recite
carrying a radiance of sapphire skies upon wings in flight
…New…
downey feathers cascaded down to my page
he fluttered to cavity abode, in an old review
New friend, beautifully captured in gilded cage
caught in the imagery of a poets delight
carrying a radiance of sapphire skies upon wings in flight
…Adoration…
comes through the seeds of tender communication
woven lines of weed, from streamside imagination
Harbinger of happiness and purest infatuation
emerged at my lowest he inspired me to write
carrying a radiance of sapphire skies upon wings in flight
 Here is my attempt at a crown of Wordflair stanzas:
“Dee’s Blooms”
 Curiosity
I merely stopped as one of those who were
impressed by Roxy’s virtuosity
I had no plans to buy and that’s for sure.
One bold and pretty image of a tree
The limbs were reaching out it seems, for me.

Enchanted
I walked away, intrigued to view the other art;
determined not to buy I found that I’d recanted
“Dee’s Blooms” had pulled me gently back by soul and heart.
A captivated soul not wanting free,
The limbs were reaching out it seems, for me.

Compelled
I fumbled to withdraw my cash
my anxiousness could not be quelled.
My purchase was not one bit rash.
I knew I’d bought excellent quality
The limbs were reaching out it seems, for me.

Assent
The blossoms were inert within the store.
At home they often have a vivid scent.
If ideas entertained by me were sore
the flowers stank; if not, most sweet they’d be.
The limbs were reaching out it seems, for me.

Direction
I’ve grown in life and love and wit
“Dee’s Bloom” has served as my connection.
to making decisions that fit.
So I thank Roxy for that tree.
The limbs were reaching out it seems, for me.

(c) Lawrencealot – August 11, 2013

Author Notes
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Ochtfochlach

The ochtfochlach is an Irish verse formof 8 lines with a consistent but unspecified length and meter. The rhyme scheme is aaab cccb. (aaabcccb)
The Ochtfochlach

I like the form and rhythm, too;
It fits and wears like well-made shoe.
With luck it lasts a whole life through
And looks no worse for wear.

Iambic feet can march along
And lend their cadence to a song
With beats that switch from soft to strong,
A pace that’s light to bear.

My example poem

Fochlach It   (Ochtfochlach)

The Ochtingfochlach rocks
it’s not some damn flummox;
I penned this wearing socks,
and yes, without my shoes.

Define most any style
this form will soon beguile
and render forth a smile.
So what is there to lose?

© Lawrencealot – December 4, 2013
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There is no requirement for meter or line-length, though I chose iambic trimeter for this write.

Trolaan

Trolaan, created by Valerie Peterson Brown, is a poem consisting of 4 quatrains.
Each quatrain begins with the same letter. The rhyme scheme is abab.
Starting with the second stanza you use the second letter of the first line of the first stanza to write the second each line beginning with that letter.
On the third stanza you will use the second letter on the first line of the second stanza and write the third each line beginning with that letter.
On the fourth stanza you will use the second letter on the first line of the third stanza and write the fourth each line beginning with that letter.
There is no mandatory line length or meter specified. (Added)

Example #1:
Distraught Blessings

Desire the sound or hope,
deluding minds in darkness.
Daunting though its scope,
deluged now with the access.

Elope into the morrow,
envelope me with song.
Enclose me now in sorrow
easing against the throng.

Longing for succulent prospect,
laying waste to eager night,
Lopsided in neglect,
listless with delight.

Only now will I protest,
owning nothing less.
Opening now I detest,
one more time to bless
.

Copyright © 2008 Valerie Peterson Brown

 
My example poem

In Sincerity, One Word or Two     (Trolaan)

Don’t you now know I love you so?
Did I not tell you many times?
Do leaves not rustle when wind blows?
Devotion I spell out in rhymes.

Oh Sweetheart, never doubt my love.
Other young ladies hit on me.
Occasionally I will sort of
Omit offending, don’t you see?

How can you feel demeaned, my sweet?
Harangues are not required at all.
Heaven knows they are not as neat.
Have trust! I love you most of all.

Open relationships are fun.
Of course I only play around
on those times I am with someone.
Otherwise, it’s with you I’m found.

© Lawrencealot – July 7, 2013

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Scupham Stanza

It was created by British poet, Peter Scupham.
It is
isosyllabic
stanzaic, written in any number of sixains,
rhymed: abccba
meter optional


Example Poem

Waisted!     (Scupham Stanza)
 
 
 
The Scupham rhyme is like our Cathie Jung.
Who is in the Guiness World Record book.
The stanza’s spread by rhyme  that pinches some
When to the middle you let rhyming come.
That could be construed as the hour-glass look.
A form for which this septarian’s sung.
© Lawrencealot – November 9, 2013
 
 
 
Author’s Note
The smallest waist belongs to Cathie Jung (USA, b. 1937),
who stands at 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) and has a corseted waist measuring
38.1 cm (15 in). Un-corseted, it measures 53.34 cm (21 in).
 
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(Decasyllabic version)
 

Rhopalic Verse

A poem wherein the nTH word of every line in each stanza has N-syllables.
word 1 = 1syllable
word 2 = 2 syllables
word 3 = 3 syllables
word 4 = 4 syllables
word 5 = 5 syllables,  etc
(Syllabic, line length optional, rhyme optional, meter optional)

Example Poem

Expecting Her (Rhopalic Verse)

I’m thinking cautiously, realizing
that other’s promises evaporate
with nature’s forcible intervention.
She’ll arrive, defeating complications.

(c) Lawrencealot – April 25, 2013

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Rhaiku

A Poetry form invented on AP by Matt
A poem consisting of One stanza of Rhyme, one stanza of haiku,
 and one stanza of free verse.
The order of the components is up to the poet.
 
Example Poem
 
Without Repentance
semi-clad, somnolent,
climbing over broken logs–
kids explore their camp
There had been no time
in the circadian twilight
to properly define the false
Niagara bubbling, with snatches
of Mozart melodies
into nearby brook.
The first awake, they had to take their tawny dog and find
the wonders here that did appear, as frozen, left behind
for summer time respite.  They’d climb and swim and even shout;
for being loud was here allowed, and home-based rules were out-
maybe fleecing their sister (decreasing her oatmeal share),
Some things do last without contrast and happen anywhere.
(c) Lawrencealot – October 20, 2012
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