Tho Tam Chu

Vietnamese Poetry

 

      • Tho Tam Chu or Eight Word Poetry appears to be more flexible in stanza length as well as tonal and end rhyme. The rhyme schemes are patterns I found in actual poems. It appears to me that as long as there is rhyme, it probably doesn’t matter what the pattern is.Tho Tam Chu is:
        • stanzaic, written in any number of either tercets, quatrains or septets.
        • measured by the number of words in the line, 8 word per line.
        • rhymed,
        • tonal rhyme is flexible except, if the end word is sharp then the 3rd word is also sharp and words 5 and 6 are flat. Conversely if the end word is flat then the 3rd word is also flat and the 5th and 6th words are sharp.
        • end rhyme
        • when written in tercets
          w w w w w w w a
          w w w w w w a b
          w w w w b w w b
        • when written in quatrains is:
    • w w w w w w w w –or —
    • w w w w w w w a
    • w w w w w w w w
    • w w w w w w w a
    • w w w w w w w w
    • w w w w w w w a
    • w w w w w w w a
    • w w w w w w w w
      • when written as a septet
        w w w w w w w a
        w w w w w w w a
        w w w w w w w a
        w w w w w w w a
        w w w w w w w b
        w w w w w w w b
        w w w w w w w w

 

 

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2058#tam
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

 

Whereas with the Bay Chu, I copped out because I had no notion of the tonal requirement, I was emboldened here by Judi’s observation that tonal rhyme was flexible.  I therefore took the liberty to equate the Vietnamese flat and sharp sounds to the English long and short sounds, and have treated the words in positions 3,5,6 and 8 accordingly.

 

From Wikipedia

Traditional long and short vowels in English orthography[edit]

English vowels are sometimes split into “long” and “short” vowels along lines different from the linguistic differentiation. Traditionally, the vowels /eɪ iː aɪ oʊ juː/ (as in bait beat bite boat bute) are said to be the “long” counterparts of the vowels /æ ɛ ɪ ɒ ʌ/ (as in bat bet bit bot but) which are said to be “short”. This terminology reflects their pronunciation before the Great Vowel Shift.

Traditional English phonics teaching, at the preschool to first grade level, often used the term “long vowel” for any pronunciation that might result from the addition of a silent E(e.g., like) or other vowel letter as follows:

Letter “Short” “Long” Example
A a /æ/ /eɪ/ mat / mate
E e /ɛ/ /iː/ pet / Pete
I i /ɪ/ /aɪ/ twin / twine
O o /ɒ/ /oʊ/ not / note
U u /ʌ/ /juː/ cub / cube

A mnemonic was that each vowel’s long sound was its name.

In Middle English, the long vowels /iː, eː, ɛː, aː, ɔː, oː, uː/ were generally written i..e, e..e, ea, a..e, o..e, oo, u..e. With the Great Vowel Shift, they came to be pronounced /aɪ, iː, iː, eɪ, oʊ, uː, aʊ/. Because ea and oo are digraphs, they are not called long vowels today. Under French influence, the letter u was replaced with ou (or final ow), so it is no longer considered a long vowel either. Thus the so-called “long vowels” of Modern English are those vowels written with the help of a silent e.

 

Pasted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vowel_length#Traditional_long_and_short_vowels_in_English_orthography

 

 My example

 

Vietnam Poetry Didactic (Tho Tam Chu)

 If word three is long, expect to find
the words five and six not so aligned.
By word three, eight’s sound is now defined.
One must keep these rules within one’s mind.
That being done, then each line is fun,
a challenge yet, here I write this one.
An unrhymed line must still conform like so.

 

© Lawrencealot – January 31, 2015

 

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Tho Tam Chu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bay Chu

Vietnamese Poetry


• Tho Bay Chu or Seven Word Poetry is written with seemingly more flexible tonal pattern than most Viet verse with the exception of when an end word is flat, the 3rd word must be sharp and when the end word is sharp, the 3rd word in the line must be flat. 

Tho Bay Chu is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains.
○ measured by number of words, 7 words per line.
○ rhymed, tonal rhyme appears to be at the discretion of the poet except if and end word is flat, the 3rd word of the line must be sharp or if the end word is sharp, the 3rd word of the line must be flat. End rhyme aaxa bbxb etc. or xaxa xbxb etc.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2058#tam
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

Cannot begin to write one of these, because the concepts of a tonal flat or sharp is not within my grasp, even though I can find audio samples on Wikipedia.

Star Sevlin

Star Sevlin is an invented shape poem that is supposed to form a star when centered on the page. It is found in Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg 1977 and was created by Lilliann Mathilda Svenson.  The only example I found on the Internet today  (1/30/2015) was a contest winner in 1951.

The Star Sevlin is:
 a heptastich, a poem in 7 lines.
 iambic syllabic, iambic  4/6/8/6/8/6/4 syllables per line.
 rhymed, rhyme scheme abbcaca.
 centered on the page.

My example

First One in 50 Years (Star Sevlin)

I don’t know why
this form is called a star
and not Svenson’s. That’s how things are.
There isn’t much to find
Good samples are in short supply
Thus my blog was designed
lest old forms die.

© Lawrencealot – January 30, 2015

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Star Sevlin

Lilit

Thai poetry.

• The Lilit is an alternating Raay and Kloang verse. Usually the Raay is used to describe the action and the Kloang is the dialogue.

The Lilit is:
○ stanzaic, alternating Raay couplets with Kloang quatrains.
○ syllabic, the couplets are 5 syllable lines and the quatrains are L1-L3 7 syllable lines and L4 is a 9 syllable line.
○ couplets composed with a chain, linking the lines of the couplet and linking the stanzas.
○ rhymed, composed with cross, interlaced and end rhyme .

x x x x a
a x x x b

b x x x c x d
x x x x d x c
x x x x d x e
x x x x c x x x e

e x x x f
f x x x g

g x x x h x i
x x x x i x h
x x x x i x j
x x x x h x x x j

Pasted fromhttp://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1035#chann
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.
Chain: A series of verses or stanzas in which the last word of the verse or stanza is repeated as the first word of the next verse or stanza.

Cross rhyme: When the end word rhymes with a word in the middle of the next line

Interlaced rhyme A word in the middle of one line rhymes with a word in the middle of another.

My example

Nuance (Lilit)

Stop and take a look.
Look at what I’ve found.

“Found something, new you say?”
While it’s okay to view
the form that way, it’s old
in fact, which you can now behold.

Behold it’s Thailand.
Thailand’s ancient verse.

Verse once inscribed on walls
and in great halls described
is something called new now
what was transcribed– ignored somehow.

© Lawrencealot – January 29, 2015

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Lilit

Kolang

  • The Kloang is stanzaic verse usually of proverbs originating in Thailand. One source suggests the Kloang attempts to capture the rhythm of oar strokes on the water. A Thai landmark Phra Mondob (Scripture Hall) built in the 19th century is decorated with Thai Verse proverbs called Kloang Lokaniti engraved on the outer-walls . The form is considered poetry of the intellectual because of its complicated tonal and rhyme patterns. Along with the Raay, it is one of the oldest forms of Thai poetry. It was developed when the Thai language had only 3 tones, high, low and neutral, the language now has 5 tones. The tonal pattern of the Kloang creates a unique rhythm which is its defining feature and impossible to emulate in English.

    Thailand’s honored poet Sunthorn Phy’s (1786-1855) most exciting adventure poem “Nirat Suphan” was written in the Kloang form.

    The Kloang is:

    • syllabic. L1, L2, L3 are 7 syllables each, L4 is 9 syllables.
    • stanzaic, written with any number of quatrains.
    • composed with an interweaving or cross rhyme scheme. The end word of L1 rhymes with the 5th syllables of L2 and L3. The end word of L2 rhymes with the 5th syllable of L4. L3 and L4 end rhyme.
    • is most often a poem of nature.
    • tonal which is impossible in the English language.

      x x x x a x b
      x x x x b x a
      x x x x b x c
      x x x x a x x x c

      Arctic Love —Judi Van Gorder

      Gnarly feet trudge on the ice,
      eighty miles entice a pawn
      of nature, the price to mate,
      four year cycle drawn up to create

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1035#chann

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My Example

East Coast Storm (Kloang)

 In the east there’s snow and ice,
for some that’s not nice you know.
Driving now takes twice the time
and air traffic flow’s far from sublime.

 © Lawrencealot – January 27, 2015

 

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Kolang

Kloon

Thai Poetry

• The Kloon or Klon (meaning simple verse) is sometimes known as the “true Thai poetic form”. It is the basic and most common Thai verse written with simple subjects and simple words.

The Kloon is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains
○ syllabic, 4 to 8 syllables per line.
○ composed with each line made up of 2 to 3 phrases.
○ rhymed with an intricate rhyme pattern. The internal rhyme can be optional or reduced. The tone is looser than most Thai forms but it the end syllable of each line is usually rising which is in sync with most Western verse of iambic meter.

x x a x a x a b
x x b x b x x c
x x x x x x x c
x x c x c x x d

x x d x d x a e
x x e x e x x f
x x x x x x x f
x x f x f x x g

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1035#chann

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Three Types of Rhyme (Kloon)

If I’m to rhyme inside and out
I’ll scout about before I start
for rhymes to fit into my art.
Apart from smartness, I’ll need wit.

Omit unfit words which outrage
as staged on page for rhyme alone.
When you are done you can’t disown
what’s shown by tone and rhythm here.

© Lawrencealot – January 27, 2015

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Kloon

Since, one can exercise options with the internal rhyme,
in this poem, I moved the rhyming columns to fit iambic
Meter. One could just as well use the above designated
Columns, and use trochaic.

Cross rhyme: When the end word rhymes with a word in the middle of the next line.
Internal rhyme: Rhyming within a line.
Interlaced rhyme A word in the middle of one line rhymes with a word in the middle of another.

Taylor

• The Taylor is an invented form, patterned from Upon a Spider Catching a Fly by Edward Taylor (1642-1729) who some call the finest colonial poet although his work was not published until 1939. A puritan poet, his poems are lyrical and yet reflect a staunch Calvanist tone. 

The Taylor is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of cinquains.
○ metric, iambic, L1 trimeter, L2 and L4 dimeter, L3 tetrameter, L5 monometer.
○ rhymed or at least near rhymed ababb cdcdd efeff etc.

Upon a Spider Catching a Fly by Edward Taylor

Thou sorrow, venom elf.
Is this thy play,
To spin a web out of thyself
To catch a fly?
For why?

I saw a pettish wasp
Fall foul therein,
Whom yet thy whorl pins did not clasp
Lest he should fling
His sting.

But as afraid, remote
Didst stand here at
And with thy little fingers stroke
And gently tap
His back.

Thus gently him didst treat
Lest he should pet,
And in a froppish waspish heat
Should greatly fret
Thy net.

Whereas the silly fly,
Caught by its leg,
Thou by the throat took’st hastily
And ‘hind the head
Bite dead.

This goes to pot, that not
Nature doth call.
Strive not above what strength hath got
Lest in the brawl
Thou fall.

This fray seems thus to us:
Hell’s spider gets
His entrails spun to whipcords’ thus,
And wove to nets
And sets,

To tangle Adam’s race
In’s stratagems
To their destructions, spoiled, made base
By venom things,
Damned sins.

But mighty, gracious Lord,
Communicate
Thy grace to break the cord; afford
Us glory’s gate
And state.

We’ll Nightingale sing like,
When perched on high
In glory’s cage, Thy glory, bright,
And thankfully,
For joy.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=616
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Broken Names (Form: Taylor)

I have a friend named Jack,
his brother’s Al.
Their mother wants her old name back
to boost locale
morale.

Since Ackbarr’s now her name
she thinks it’s broken,
perverted by the Islam game
when it’s a token
spoken.

One can’t now yell, “Hi, Jack”
most any where
nor “Allen Ackbarr, glad you’re back!
You been somewhere
by air?”

© Lawrencealot – January 26, 2015

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Taylor

Tawddgyrch Cadwynog

Tawddgyrch Cadwynog

Type:

Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Stanzaic

Description:

(TOWDD-girch ca-DOY-nog) This is a Welsh line form consisting of three to five sections of tetrasyllabic verse with abbc or abba rhyme that continues into the next line.

Origin:

Welsh

Schematic:

xxxa xxxb xxxb xxxc
xxxa xxxb xxxb xxxc

Or:

xxxa xxxb xxxb xxxa
xxxa xxxb xxxb xxxa

The scheme follows through at least two lines, then can change.

 

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/003/306.shtml

My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

_________________________________

 This form consists of stanzas of usually four, lines, of four syllables: A. B. B. A.

Like the Rhupunt, it is common to join the lines together and end up with the two stanzas making a couplet.

X X X X X X X X X X X X A.

X X X X X X X X X X X X A.

In subsequent stanzas the rhyme may change, but not the pattern, C. D.D. C. and so on.

Pasted from http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/welsh/tawd.html

Many thanks to John Clitheroe for his work on the PoetsGarret site.

My example

A Variable Line Count Poem (Tawddgyrch Cadwynog)

To get it right
pen four by four
then add four more;
that’s how you write.

This form is tight
and furthermore
it is a chore
that does delight.

Two quatrains do
a couplet make;
and then you take
them up by two

(I know you knew),
for heaven’s sake
this takes the cake,
a brand new view.

OR

To get it right pen four by four
then add four more; that’s how you write.
This form is tight and furthermore
it is a chore that does delight.
Two quatrains do a couplet make;
and then you take them up by two
(I know you knew), for heaven’s sake
this takes the cake, a brand new view.

OR

To get it right pen four by four then add four more; that’s how you write.
This form is tight and furthermore it is a chore that does delight.
Two quatrains do a couplet make; and then you take them up by two
(I know you knew), for heaven’s sake this takes the cake, a brand new view.

 

© Lawrencealot – January 26, 2015

Short Rondel

• The Short Rondel might better be described as a short Rondeau than Rondel because this form uses the rentrement or first phrase of L1 as a refrain rather than the full line as in the Rondel. 

The Short Rondel is:
○ a poem in 11 lines made up of sixain followd by a quintain.
○ isosyllabic, often 8 syllalbe lines, except for L6 & L11 which are the shorter first phrase of L1.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme aabbcC ddeeC.
r r r C x x x a
x x x x x x x a
x x x x x x x b
x x x x x x x b
r r r C
x x x x x x x d
x x x x x x x d
x x x x x x x e
x x x x x x x e
r r r C

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1382#shortrondel
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

I Walk My Dog

I Walk My Dog (Short Rondel)

I walk my dog to let him pee
on damn near every pole we see.
We do not walk to get somewhere,
before we started we were there.
In bright sunshine and in the fog
I walk my dog.

He’s introduced me to new folk
with whom we now will stop and joke.
The children love my little guy
and that is really part of why
I walk my dog.

© Lawrencealot – January 24, 2015

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Short Rondel

Serena

• Serena has 2 definitions:

○ Serena(Occitan-serene song) is a song of the troubadours that appeared late in Provencal lyrical poetry and is the counterpart of the Alba. It builds around the theme of waiting for nightfall. Specifically a lover waiting to consummate his love, such circumstance would not communicate “serene” to me. The frame is at the discretion of the poet.

○ The Serena is also a modern day invented form created by Edith Thompson and found in Pathway for the Poet by Viola Berg. It uses head and tail rhyme.
The invented Serena from Pathways … is:
§ is a poem in 11 lines.
§ syllabic, L1,L9,L11 are 4 syllables each. L2 & L10 are 3 syllables each and L3 thru L8 are 7 sylables each.
§ head and tail rhymed, the head rhyme is AAbbccddAAx and the tail rhyme is ABcxccddABb, x being unrhymed.
§ composed with a refrain, L1 & L2 are repeated as L9 & L10.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1111#serena
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My effort here will deal with the specific invented form.

My example

What’s the Doubt About (Form: Serena)

Rhyme is sublime
I’m assured,
heard as accent to a beat.
Word is that excess is not
neat; it ought be a discrete
treat or aim may meet defeat.
Bawdy rhyme one might applaud,
flawed or not so help me God.
Rhyme is sublime
I’m assured.
The truth’s obscured.

© Lawrencealot – January 22, 2015

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Serena