Triple Stance

The form was created by Lisa La Grange, writing on Allpoetry.com.

The Triple Stance is:
Stanzaic: Consisting of any number of sestets
Metered: Each stanza consisting of 4 lines of iambic dimeter, and 2 line of iambic trimeter.
Rhyme Pattern: abcabc, where the a-rhymes are feminine.

My Example

What Knees? (Triple Stance)

What Knees

My sister fretting
about her knees –
“They’re knobby, don’t you think?”
“What I am betting’s
that no one sees
them; have another drink.”

“So stop your loathing
cus I’ll make book
one thing is crystal clear,
If you’ve no clothing
they’ll never look
below your thighs my dear.”

© Lawrencealot – July 6, 2015

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Triple Stance

Dream Song

The Dream Song at first glance could probably be considered a style or genre of poetry because of the prominent “dream theme”. But with more careful examination, the Dream Song is a framed verse form with a specific stanzaic prescription. It was created by American poet, John Berryman’s (1914-1972) book of 77 Dream Songs . He continued to write Dream Songs after the book was published and there are over 400 of his Dream Songs in circulation. The poems seem to me to be recordings of Berryman’s dreams in verse. They are often disjointed and bizarre although the frame of the poems remains consistent. There is a reoccurring character Henry who as a black faced minstrel is called Mr. Bones. The poems include “wrenched syntax, scrambled diction, extraordinary leaps of language and tone, and wild mixture of high lyricism and low comedy” . Poem Hunter.com.

The Dream Song is:
• a verse form, the poem is written in 3 sixains, 18 lines.
• metric, Accentual, usually L1,L2,L4,& L5 5 stresses and L3 & L6 have 3 stresses. As long as 4 lines are longer and L3 & L6 are shorter, the rhythm is jerky much like the content.
• rhymed, rhyme patterns vary from stanza to stanza however there are normally 3 rhymes per stanza. abcabc abccba, aabccb, abbacc are a few of the patterns. abcbac is the pattern of the stanza below.

Dream Song #112 by John Berryman 

My framework is broken, I am coming to an end,
God send it soon. When I had most to say
my tongue clung to the roof
I mean of my mouth. It is my Lady’s birthday
which must be honored, and has been. God send
it soon.

I now must speak to my disciples, west
and east. I say to you, Do not delay
I say, expectation is vain.
I say again, It is my Lady’s birthday
which must be honoured. Bring her to the test
at once.

I say again, It is my Lady’s birthday
which must be honoured, for her high black hair
but not for that alone:
for every word she utters everywhere
shows her good soul, as true as a healed bone,—
being part of what I meant to say.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=623
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My Example

Re-curring Dream (Dream Song)

Alone, depressed, confused, but well, I dream.
I’m working at a place I’ve never seen.
Achievement comes with ease.
I’m asked to make a lunch run for the team
Two blocks away exists a small canteen
“Get crackers, coffee, cheese!”

The walk there’s pleasant, takes no time at all.
The staff all greet me smiling, with good cheer
and hand me tasty eats.
I leave and find I’m in a massive mall
it’s blocks across and doors are nowhere near,
and none return to streets.

I ask for help, and people point the way;
they’re wrong! I ask again and people stare…
Of course they do, I’m nude.
I criss and cross the sprawling mall all day
I’m nearly nuts but suffer no despair –
I’ve all the friggin’ food.

© Lawrencealot – December 7, 2014

 

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Dream Song

Cywydd llosgyrnog

Cywydd llosgyrnog, ców-idd llos-gr-notheg, 12th codified ancient Welsh Meter, a Cywydd, is composed in sixains. It is speculated that the Welsh poets learned this meter from a common medieval Latin hymn form.

The Cywydd llosgyrnog is:
• stanzaic, written in any number of sixains.
• syllabic, the sixain is made up of 8-8-7-8-8-7 syllable lines.
• rhymed, L1 and L2 end-rhyme is echoed somewhere in the middle of L3 (3rd, 4th, or 5th syllables). L4 and L5 end-rhyme is echoed somewhere in the middle of L6. L3 and L6 end rhyme.

x x x x x x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x A x x x B (A could shift position slightly)
x x x x x x x C
x x x x x x x C
x x C x x x B (C could shift position slightly)
Y mae goroff a garaf
O gof aelaw aga a folaf
O choeliaf gael i chalon’
Am na welais i myn Elien
O Lanurful ilyn Aerfen
wawr mor wen o’r morynion
— Dafydd ap Demwnd[/i]

Friend or Foe by Judi Van Gorder

Knight of the Round Table, King’ s friend,
the fabled handsome one, men commend,
lived to defend, valor seen,
Sir Lancelot earned his reward.
Though prowess unmatched with the sword,
betrayed his Lord, loved his queen. 

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=976
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

The Evil of Dorian Johnson

 

The Evil of Dorian Johnson (Cywydd llosgyrnog)

Had he not lied, I have no doubt
the race-baiters would have found clout
based upon the past grievous acts –
not current facts, but an excuse.
Men’s Billy-clubs and dogs turned loose
and past abuse against blacks.

Liar became provocateur
with consequences real and sure.
“Hands-up” became a news-reel theme
that fit the scheme of liberal guilt
to ratchet hatred to the hilt
and tilt acts to the extreme.

Their community has been wrecked
and clearly left without respect.
Some children have no Christmas hopes
all caused by mopes* of thuggish bent
for whom this cultural descent
to crime meant – a city gropes.

One perp whose lie became a blaze,
that caused a city to be razed.
If there is justice anywhere
he ought to wear perpetual shame 
and be singled out by his name;
he’s to blame for much despair.

© Lawrencealot – November 26, 2014

Author Notes:
Dorian Johnson (accomplice in the convenience store robbery and witness
against Officer Wilson) Not only does he contradict himself in his own
statements in the same session, but makes unsustainable and impossible
claims about the event that are impossible to have happened.

*Mope(From Urban dictionary)
A person of any race or culture that is: presenting themselves as uneducated
(either by mannerisms or the clothing they are wearing). Plural = Mopes
Mopes usually are up to no good and may have an extensive criminal
record and a limited vocabulary.

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Cywydd llosgyrnog

Laurel

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

 

 

The Laurel is another invented verse form created by Viola Berg that switches meter and rhyme between stanzas.

The Laurel is:
a poem in 24 lines, made up of 4 sixains.
metric, L1, L3, L4, L5 are iambic tetrameter, L2 and L6 are iambic trimeter.
rhyme, abcccb adeeed fghhhg fijjji.
the trimeter lines are indented.
 

 

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol>

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

My example

 Scorn the Reaper (Laurel)

You won’t find me afraid of him —
the reaper with the scythe.
I never was before this day;
I haven’t lived my life that way,
and that’s the way it’s gonna stay
as I run out my life.

He’s pictured as a guy that’s grim
but that’s a fantasy.
A tale that’s told (to what avail),
with heaven added to your hell?
I’ll live my life, and live it well,
for what shall be shall be.

My organs all shall pass to dust
as someday will the stars.
Before my intermission comes
I’ll eat fresh fruit and dried-out plums
I’ll dance to music played by drums
banjos and steel guitars.

I’ll acquire lovers, friends, and trust
that measure suits me fine.
My body’s served me, so’s my mind.
The body part, I’ll leave behind,
I’m not sure what my mind might find
and claim at last as mine.

© Lawrencealot – September 14, 2014

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Laurel

Dryden’s Roundelay

Dryden’s Roundelay
Type: Structure, Metrical Requirement, Repetitive Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Isosyllabic
Description: This is an isosyllabic fixed form in four sestets turning on only two rhymes with interweaving repetition. The sestets use alternating rhyme, as does the sicilian sestet. The last couplet is a refrain that appears in all four stanzas. The third and fourth lines in one stanza are the first and second in the next. So, there are only four lines not repeated: the first and second in the first stanza and the third and fourth in the fourth.
Attributed to: John Dryden
Origin: English
Schematic: Rhyme and repetition:
abA1B1A2B2
A1B1A3B3A2B2
A3B3A4B4A2B2
A4B4abA2B2.

Where A1, A2, A3, A4, B1, B2, B3, and B4 are
repetitions or refrains.

Meter:  Xx Xx Xx Xx (Trochaic tetrameter)
Rhythm/Stanza Length: 6
Line/Poem Length: 24

Pasted from <http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/001/100.shtml>
My Thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his work on the wonderful poetrybase resource.
___________
Roundelay as defined in the dictionary is a short simple song with a refrain. However as a fixed stanzaic form, the English poet John Dryden, 1631-1700, created a two rhyme, repetition of lines in a set pattern that is recognized as the Roundelay, the English Roundelay or the Dryden Roundelay. In essence the poet writes only 12 of the 24 lines.

The English Roundelay is:
• stanzaic, four sixains (6 line stanzas).
• metric, often written in trochaic tetrameter with some of the lines catalectic (one syllable short) to create a strong end rhyme. (SuSuSuSu or SuSuSuS) S = stressed, u = unstressed
• rhymed, only 2 rhymes are used throughout the poem, alternating rhyme scheme ababab.
• composed with all lines repeated in a prescribed pattern except L1, L2, L21, and L22 which are not repeated. Pattern of repetition is abA¹B¹A²B² A¹B¹A³B³A²B² A³B³A4B4A²B² A4B4abA²B² .

from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/654-roundelay-or-english-roundelay-or-drydens-roundelay/> 

 

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.
Here is Roundelay by John Dryden
I.
Chloe found Amyntas lying,
All in tears, upon the plain,
Sighing to himself, and crying,
Wretched I, to love in vain!
Kiss me, dear, before my dying;
Kiss me once, and ease my pain.

II.
Sighing to himself, and crying,
Wretched I, to love in vain!
Ever scorning, and denying
To reward your faithful swain.
Kiss me, dear, before my dying;
Kiss me once, and ease my pain.

III.
Ever scorning, and denying
To reward your faithful swain.—
Chloe, laughing at his crying,
Told him, that he loved in vain.
Kiss me, dear, before my dying;
Kiss me once, and ease my pain.

IV.
Chloe, laughing at his crying,
Told him, that he loved in vain;
But, repenting, and complying,
When he kissed, she kissed again:
Kissed him up, before his dying;
Kissed him up, and eased his pain.
Pasted from <http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/roundelay/>

Related forms: Dryden’s Roundelay, RondeletRoundelayTermelay

 

My Example Poem

Wrapper Rage (Dryden’s Roundelay)

Wrapper Rage

 

Fumbling like a foolish flake-
Package had such sight appeal.
Nigh impossible to break
Sealed with some sadistic zeal.
Foiled now is the thoughtless snake
Who would steal small things piecemeal.

Nigh impossible to break
Sealed with some sadistic zeal.
Wrapper rage, for heaven’s sake
Now is part of shopping’s deal.
Foiled now is the thoughtless snake
Who would steal small things piecemeal.

Wrapper rage, for heaven’s sake
Now is part of shopping’s deal.
Sometimes tin snips it may take
getting through the whole ordeal.
Foiled now is the thoughtless snake
Who would steal small things piecemeal.

Sometimes tin snips it may take
getting through the whole ordeal.
Save the clamshells just to bake!
Give us cartons we can peel.
Foiled now is the thoughtless snake
Who would steal small things piecemeal.

© Lawrencealot – August 8, 2014

 

 

Brevee

  • The Brevee  is a terse list of related rhymes. One more verse form that appears to be invented as a learning tool, it was created by Marie Adams.
    The Brevee is:

    • stanzaic, written in any number of sixains.
    • syllabic, L1 L2 L4 L5 are 2 syllables each line and L3 & L6 are 4 syllables each.
    • rhymed, rhyme scheme aabccb ddeffe. (aabccbddeffe)

    • Cold by Judi Van Gorder
      Little
      brittle
      fragments of ice
      splinter
      winter
      ski paradise.
My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO
Specifications restated:
Stanzaic:  Any number of sestets
Syllabic: 2/2/4/2/2/4
Rhymed: aabccb

My example poem

Own It, Loan It (Brevee)

Own it
loan it
it’s forgotten.
Home made?

No, ‘fraid
it was boughten.

Pretend
the friend
is really nice-
It’s kind
of mind
to trust them twice.

Well when
again
the same occurs,
out think
the stink
and this trick cures.

Use brain
obtain
for that sad-sack
your want
up front;
borrow it back!

© Lawrencealot – March 14, 2014

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Scallop

  • The Scallop is an invented stanzaic form written in sixains. It was created by Marie L Blanche Adams.
    The Scallop is:

    • stanzaic, written in any number of sixains.
    • syllabic, 2/4/6/6/4/2 syllables per line.
    • rhymed, rhyme scheme abccba deffed ghiihg etc.
My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO
My example poem
What Need for Rhyme    (Scallop)
What need
have you for rhyme?
Is there a purpose served,
are rhyming words deserved
all of the time?
Indeed!
If I
should someday choose
to forego rhyming verse
my spirit would be worse
and I would lose,
so why?
© Lawrencealot –  April 4, 2014
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Logolilt

  • The Logolilt is an invented verse form that features diminishing line length. It was created by Flozari Rockwood.The Logolilt is:
    • stanzaic written in any number of sixains made up of 2 tercets each.
    • syllabic, 8/4/2/8/4/2 8/4/2/8/4/2.
    • rhymed, rhyme scheme aabccb ddeffe. (aabccbddeffe)
My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO
My Example
I Taught My Grandkid, Too (Logolilt)
I frequently find I must dunk
a yummy chunk
into
my hot chocolate or coffee-
that’s just like me.
Do You?

© Lawrencealot – April 1, 2014

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Logolilt

Minuette

  • Minuette is a verse form with short lines possibly the rhythm of the lines is meant to simulate the rhythm of the musical minuette. Introduced byViola Berg, it is similar to the Sweetbriar.The Minuette is:
    • a poem in 12 lines made up of 2 sixains.
    • syllabic, all lines 4 syllables long. 
    • rhymed, rhyme scheme xxaxxaxxbxxb.
    • composed with L3,L6,L9,L12 indented.
My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource at PMO
My Example Poem
Tax Code Charity    (Minuette)
 
I voted twice, 
in different years 
     for Reagan’s way. 
I voted twice, 
against the guy 
     who now holds sway. 
I give at church 
I give in town 
     I really care 
as much as Bill 
who gave the poor 
     his underwear. 
 
© Lawrencealot – April 2, 2014
 
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Rime Couée

Rime Couée is a tail-rhymed verse form of 12th century Provencal troubadours. Though it originated in France, it is thought to be the predecessor of the more popular Scot form, the Burns Stanza. 

The Rime Couée is:
  • stanzaic, written in any number of sixains made up of two tercets.
  • accentual, folk meter of normal speech. L1,L2, L4, L5 are longer lines of a similar length, L3 and L6 are shorter lines of the same length.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme aabccb, ddeffe etc.
Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful PMO resource.

My example Poem

St. Joseph Lighthouse – Lake Michigan        (Rime Couée)
St Joseph Lighthouse

When Old Man Winter struts his stuff
to show that he is good enough
he paints in white.
Unlike the art-work done by Spring
where colors touch most everything
pastel or bright.

His canvass can be anything
a bridge a tree, an old coil spring
that’s left outside.
St. Joseph lighthouse shown above
received full measure of his love.
I’m satisfied.

©Lawrencealot – February 8, 2014

Photo Credit:  Facebook  – unknown, Rights belong to photographer
 
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