Casbairdne

Casbairdne (koss búyer-dne):
Each stanza is a quatrain of seven syllables. Lines two and four rhyme and lines one and three consonate with them. There are at least two cross-rhymes* in each couplet. In the first couplet, this isn’t necessarily exact. The final syllable of line four alliterates* with the preceding stressed word.

x x b x (x x ac)
x a x x x (x bc)
x x x b (x x dc)
x x c x x (x bc)

Dying II

In death comes dust’s solution.
A truth to breath- inclusion;
small particles’ pollution
in loss of cause- collusion.

Thin dry threads still intertwine,
fill failing eyes- unconfined;
as whispered wings recombine
the swirling realms- reassign.

©Leny Roovers 05-10-2004

Pasted from http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/celtic1.html

The Casbiardne (koss búyer-dne) is bruilingeacht, a modified dán díreach, an ancient Irish Verse Form which uses consonant rhyme and cross internal rhyme. 

The Casbairdne is:
• written in any number of quatrains,
• syllabic each line has 7 syllables.
• composed with L2 and L4 end rhyme and the end words of L1 and L3 consonate with the rhyme of L2 and L4
• often written with at least two internal cross rhymes in each couplet. (the 1st couplet near rhyme OK)
• composed with 2 words alliterated in each line.
• written with the final syllable of L4 alliterates with the preceding stressed word.
• written with the defining features of most Celtic poems, cywddydd (harmony of sound) and dunadh (ending the poem with the same word, phrase or line with which the poem began) Irish Verse Forms

capital = true rhyme / lower case = near rhyme / italics = consonant rhyme
x x a x x x b
x x x b x x A
A x x x x x b
x B x x x a A

Laughing in Fall Colors by Judi Van Gorder
Tall and golden stalks of wheat,
wet meadow painted for fall,
squall of autumn Earth whirls wit,
fae fit for a season’s scrawl.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1178
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

Casbairdne
Type: Structure, Metrical Requirement, Rhyme Scheme Requirement, Other Requirement, Isosyllabic, Stanzaic
Description: Pronounced coss-BUYer-dne, this is an Irish syllabic form. The verse is a quatrain composed of seven syllable lines. Beyond that, the form gets rather messy.
• These lines have trisyllabic endings. (Rhymes go across three syllables: higgledy, piggledy, but usually real words)
• Lines two and four rhyme.
• Line one consonates with two and three consonates with four.
• There are at least two cross-rhymes per couplet, although they can be off true in the first couplet. These cross-rhymes might appear anywhere between the second and fourth syllables. (As indicated in the schematic by the italicized letters.)
• The final syllable of line four alliterates with the preceding stressed word.
• Like most Celtic forms, the end should be the beginning in syllable, word, phrase, or line. (See Dunadh link below.)
My thanks to Professor Lewis Turco for clarifying this definition.
Origin: Irish
Schematic:
x x b x (x x ac)
x a x x (x x bc)
x x x b (x x dc)
x x c x (x x bc)
Rhythm/Stanza Length:
4

Pasted from  http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/000/33.shtml
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

FORM:
Casbhairn or Casbairdne (koss búyer-dne) is a traditional Irish quatrain of 7-syllable lines ending in 3-syllable words, its old form (followed here) requiring it be rimed aabb (last syllables properly rimed, the other two syllables slant-rimed), with cross-rimes in each couplet (near rime okay in first couplet) and alliteration in every line (always between end-word and preceding stressed word in the second couplet). Being Irish, it requires the dunedh, that is, to end where it began (first word, phrase, or line repeated in closing).  The modern specs differ, as can be seen here:
http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/celtic1.html#cas

They Just Wouldn’t Stay Still
-by Venicebard (Gary Kent Spain)

Mortimer the mortician,
Bored, became a beautician.
Yet, scared by his scrutiny,
Dared many to mutiny.

Where others might mollify,
He didn’t quite qualify.
Hence he served them certainer:
Murdered them did Mortimer.

Pasted from http://allpoetry.com/poem/9055687–They-Just-Wouldn-t-Stay-Still—Casbairdne–by-venicebard

My example

Medicinal Music (Casbairdne)

Melanie self-medicates
moreover she meditates,
and contemplates certainly
with cerebral certainty.

Hating to act harmfully
she gets high on harmony
finding that’s no felony
she’s mild, is our Melanie.

© Lawrencealot – October 8, 2014

Visual template
(Old style)

Casbairdne

Droighneach

Droighneach (drá-yi-nah, ‘thorny’) is a traditional Irish quatrain stanza of 9-to-13-syllable lines alternately rimed (abab), always on 3-syllable words, with at least two cross-rimes linking the pair of lines in each half and involving those lines’ end-words, plus alliteration in every line, usually between the end-word and the preceding stressed word—always the case for a quatrain’s last line. Being Irish, it also requires the dunedh, meaning it should end where it began (opening word or phrase or line repeated at the end). It is also described here:

http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/celtic1.html#dro

…and here:

http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1172
My thanks to Gary Kent Spain, aka Venicebard on Allpoetry.
I have copied below both links he provided, unfortunately neither poet was able to follow the first requirement – ending each line with a three-syllable word.
Author Notes accompanying Gary’s Poem below:

My hobby since childhood—never quite grew up! In the 80s, when I was a programmer and had tons of money but no life, I acquired a collection of micro-scale (1/300) WW2 Russian front stuff: once counted just draft horses and had over a thousand, plus several hundred cavalry. Now, of course, no time nor space for them, so the above is all in my mind at the moment.
God’s Paintbrush (Self-Satirical Droighneach)
I’m a military miniature:  commander,
whose panzer division invades a vast library.
No adversary yet:  I’d prefer to philander
but, in all candor, can’t, be’ng lead—quite the contrary!

I’m ten millimeters tall, dark-haired, and handsomely
decked-out in dandy garb, my honor unimpaired.
A fine match! had God not dared, rudely, randomly,
to make me small, handy for his wars, all undeclared.

I see God now, armed with air-brush, advancing
to paint pants with coats field grey, dapper and debonair.
Care He’ll take to touch hands and face with flesh, enhancing
our stance’s appearance, dirt-dappled and doctrinaire.

Shall we commend God’s industry?  Call His quandary
fond, airy prospect of war-games couched on calendar.
His hand arrays us, ready by time’s boundary.
I’m a military miniature:  come and err.
[And, dear jongleur, please pronounce err properly, else all will end up unseemly and up in the ‘air’!]

_________________________

Droighneach (dra’iy-nach) Gaelic, is Oglachas, straying from some of the stringent rules of dán direach yet adding other requirements which make the frame no less difficult. It is sometimes referred to as “the thorny” because of the degree of difficulty in writing this ancient Irish Verse Form that employs cross rhyme and requires 3 syllable end words.

The Droighneach is:
• a loose stanzaic form usually written with any number of octaves but it could be quatrains.
• syllabic with each line with 9 to 13 syllables.
• terminated, written with 3 syllable end words.
• rhymed, with alternating end rhyme abab cdcd etc.
• composed with cross rhyme. There are at least two cross-rhymes in each couplet and alliteration in each line; usually the final word of the line alliterates with the preceding stressed word, this is always true of the last line.
• written with the defining features of most Celtic poems, cywddydd (harmony of sound) and dunadh (beginning and ending the poem with the same word, phrase or line.)

(x x d) b x x x (x x a)
x x x x a x x x (x x b)
x x x x x b (x x a)
x x x x a x x (x x b)
x x x x x d x x (x x c)
x x x c x x x x x x (x x d)
x x d x x x x x x (x x c)
x x x x c x (d x d)

Incomprehensible by Judi Van Gorder
Brutality bursts in the streets of Fallujah,
a plethora of purposeless mutilation,
the execution, a disgrace to Allah,
a disgusting coup d’ etat in jubilation.

Humanity is not served by the criminals,
victim’s funerals expose the amorality.
A pity mankind oft’ acts as cannibals,
animals display less base brutality.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/1172-droighneach/
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on the PMO resource.

____________

Droighneach (dra’iy-nach):
A loose stanza form. Each line can have from nine to thirteen syllables, and it always ends in a trisyllabic word. There is rhyming between lines one and three, two and four, etc. Stanzas can have any number of quatrains. There are at least two cross-rhymes in each couplet and alliteration in each line; usually the final word of the line alliterates with the preceding stressed word, and this is always true of the last line.

x x d b x x x (x x a)
x x x x a x x x (x x b)
x x x x x b (x x a)
x x x x a x x (x x b)
x x x x x d x x (x x c)
x x x c x x x x x x (x x d)
x x d x x x x x x (x x c)
x x x x c x (x x d)

Silken Lady

A silken coat enhances her elegance,
casually clad, but warm and enfolding
her slim limbs in folds of furry fragrance;
green eyes gaze haughtily- a heart beholding.

She licks her lips, a pink tongue seen- disappears;
a lazy yawn, with blinking eyes, amazes,
her devoted audience she domineers.
A soft scream- hairs on end- her purr appraises.
©Leny Roovers 29-10-2004

Pasted from http://www.thepoetsgarret.com/celtic1.html#dro
__________________________________

My example poem

Grandiose (Droighneach)

Contemplate before the jongleurs congregate.
If your work is great, that work they may elevate
some day (some say you’ have to wait and die), consecrate
what they appreciate, and critics nominate.

Given my more likely fate (if you are wondering)
to wander in obscurity (we populate
the wide world, mate) and cause laughs by my blundering.
To be but an underling is hard to contemplate.

© Lawrencealot – August 8, 2014

Visual Template

Droighneach

Deibhidhe Guilbnech Dialtach

Deibhidhe (jay-vée) and its variations are dán direach. These ancient Irish Verse Forms carry a deibhidhe or light rhyme. Meaning that each rhymed couplet rhymes a stressed end syllable with an unstressed end syllable. In English rhyme is usually between 2 stressed syllables (yellow/ mellow, time/ rhyme ) but Celtic verse often deliberately rhymes a stressed and unstressed syllable (distress / angriness, west / conquest), easier said than done. As with most ancient Irish forms the Deibhidhes are written with cywddydd (harmony of sound) and dunadh (ending the poem with the same word, phrase or line with which the poem began)Note: When writing in English it is sometimes very difficult to meet the stringent requirements of dan direach, so example poems are included that may not always demonstrate all of the features described.

• Deibhidhe Guilbnech Dialtach is:
○ written in any number of quatrains,
○ each line has 7 syllables.
○ rhymed, aabb.
○ alliterated, alliteration between two words in each line,
○ all end-words should consonate.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1173#guilbnech
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

A wonderful example I found:

A Deibhidhe* on Clocks Stuck at Midnight
by Gary Kent Spain

angel imp with withered wing
from chains delivered limping
then bossed, denied might and means
while men tossed you pied pipedreams

drab duality’s fall meant
full equality’s advent:
did distaste since harbored hide
hate’s misplaced ardor inside?

how clamped tight is your grasp, ghost
of the past: light the lamppost
change the spinner, hound out hell
bound by your inner angel

* (pronounced “jay-vee”)

Kent’s notes
Deibhidhe (pronounced “jay-vee”) is an ancient Irish measure consisting of 7-syllable lines rimed in couplets on the last syllable, stressed with unstressed. This poem has all the bells and whistles of Dan Direach (‘strict meter’): cross-rimes on every stress, alliteration in every line—preferably between last two stressed words (this last a requirement in the 3rd and 4th lines of each quatrain)—and the dunadh (first syllable, word, phrase, or line repeated in closing).

This poem (I think fairly obviously) addresses keeping up with the last half-century’s change in the general attitude towards race in America (on the part of those who were once victims of widespread discrimination and prejudice).

My example poem

Or, More Likely, Snow (Deibhidhe Guilbnech Dialtach)

Streamlets rushing from mountain’s source
become cascading creeks of course.
Creeks combine in the course of time
with mountain’s mandate being prime.

The brooks that babble then will merge
into a river’s rapid surge
and kissing, carve the mountain’s face
removing, rock which slowed its pace.

Great and ginormous rivers flow
to seas– there seized into escrow
where they await their great refrain
on mountain tops to fall as rain.

© Lawrencealot – August 7, 2014

Visual Template

Deibhidhe Guilbnech Dialtach

The Stevenson

The Stevenson is an invented verse form patterned after the poem, Requiem by Robert Louis Stevenson, Scottish poet 1850-1894.

The Stevenson is:
○ an octastich (8 line poem) made up of 2 quatrains.
○ metric, L1-L3 & L5-L7 are iambic tetrameter, L4 & L8 are iambic trimeter.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme aaabcccb.

{Insert by Lawrencealot
Note:  I reject the metric representation and present RESTATED specifications below.}

Requiem by Robert Lewis Stevenson 1879

Under the wide and starry sky,
Dig the grave and let me lie.
Glad did I live and gladly die,
And I laid me down with a will.

This is the verse you grave for me:
‘Here he lies where he longed to be;
Here is the sailor, home from the sea,
And the hunter home from the hill.’

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on the PMO resource.

I was having difficulty scanning this poem, so asked for help from Gary Kent Spain, who provided the following:

UND er the WIDE and STAR ry SKY,
DIG the GRAVE and LET me LIE.
GLAD did i LIVE and GLAD ly DIE,
And i LAID me DOWN with a WILL.

THIS is the VERSE you GRAVE for ME:
‘HERE he LIES where he LONGED to BE;
HERE is the SAIL or, HOME from the SEA,
And the HUNT er HOME from the HILL.

It IS three lines of tetrameter followed by one of trimeter, but not strictly iambic:  the tetrameters are basically iambic (if a bit trochee heavy, and that last foot in S2L3 is an anapest), but the trimeter lines are roughly anapestic:  most anapestic-style lines in English have some iambs strewn about in them.  Perhaps ‘sprung’ rhythm would better be applied to meter such as this, where the nature of the foot is less rigid than normal; but that would fly in the face of convention I guess.

My thanks to Gary for the above. We see the same kind of reliance upon stressed syllables in the form “The Stephens”.

My Example poem

My Requiem (The Stevenson)

Wherever I have been I’ve been
content existing there and then
and never wondered where or when
I’d cash my chips and die.
So when I transfer from this realm
I reckon I’ll not overwhelm
the maker if he’s at the helm,
for he’ll know when and why.

© Lawrencealot – July 20, 2014

Note: This poem was written using the specifications set forth by Van Gorder, above.
It is correct according to her metric specifications, but is a corruption of the Stevenson, shown by the 2nd template below.

 

Added to original content.

In October 2015 I noticed about the meter. At that time in my development I had a much broader and hopefully more complete understanding of meter generally than I did when this was first entered here. This is my current analysis:

One can keep the definition for L1-L3, L5-L7 presented by Van Gorder if one realizes that single foot substitutions are allowed almost anywhere except the final foot in a line and trochee substitutions occur in the first foot in ALL of the tetrameter lines.
I think that is quite reasonable, BUT there is no way the trimeter lines can properly be called iambic.
One can NOT make final foot substitution and keep the metric name imho.

Therefore to answer the question recently put to me by Avraham Roos, I hereby boldly reject the specification presented above and PROPOSE that this is the correct metric specification for the Stevenson:

The Stevenson is:
An Octastitch made up of two quatrains.
Metric with L1-L3 and L5-L8 composed in IAMBIC TETRAMETER, and
with L4 and L8 composed of ANAPESTIC TRIMETER.
Each tetrameter line begins with a trochee foot substitution, and
each trimeter line contains an iamb foot substitution as foot two.

 

Visual Templates

The Stevenson

Here is the template as used by Stevenson.


Stevenson2

Here is Stevenson’s Requiem, had he followed the metric without
extra substition or headless feet. Only L2 and L7 are changed,
and the L7 change makes the line unnatural.

Under the wide and starry sky,
Dig me a grave and let me lie.
Glad did I live and gladly die,
and I laid me down with a will.
This is the verse you grave for me:
‘Here he lies where he longed to be;
‘Here is the sailor, home from sea,
And the hunter home from the hill.’

 

 

Presidential Meter

The Presidential Meter form was created by Gary Kent Spain, aka venicebard on Allpoetry.

The form is stanzaic, consisting of any number of quatrains
It is syllabic: 6/5/6/5
Rhyme Scheme: xaxa
It is metric: with long lines being an anapest plus an amphibrach
And the short lines being and anapest and an iamb, or as Gary points out below it can be spoken as trochaic trimeter..So take your choice.
8 lines or more.

His poem in trochaic trimeter:

The Lyre-in-Chief

“If you like your doctor,
if you like your plan,
you can keep your doctor,
you can keep your plan.”
The Liar-in-Chief
War through regulation
waged on you and me.
IRS men target
those who disagree.

Congress is not needed!
for, as he has said,
with his pen and cell-phone,
he becomes the head.

Work that crowd there, baby:
tell them racists lurk.
Tell them those that want to
shouldn’t have to work.

Push those same old buttons,
get that same old drink:
hear-no-evil voters
(lemmings on the brink).
Pasted from <http://allpoetry.com/poem/11504624-The-Lyre-in-Chief-by-venicebard>

Gary’s response to my metric interpretation – So you’re saying I misinterpreted his meter, eh?  You are right, in that the way HE says it, it is an anapest followed by two iambs (with feminine ending on odd-numbered lines).  But it CAN be spoken as trochaic trimeter, and I went with that.  Cheers!

My example using an anapest foot:

The Presidential Way (Presidential Meter)

I will gladly enter
yet another form
that allows remembrance
that a lie’s the norm.

Anapests are starting
each and every line.
Then you use an iamb
where you want the rhyme.

First he won by plying
us with guilt and pride.
From the start however,
the man lied and lied.

© Lawrencealot – June 2, 2014

Visual Template

Presidential Meter

Paired Triquin

This is a form recently invented by Gary Kent Spain, aka venicebard on allpoetry.
To Quote Gary:
 Some paired what, you say?  This is a form I invented recently, not just to invent a form but because I liked the sound of it.
‘Triquin’ is a reversal of ‘quatrain’ (I dropped the a because both ‘triquain’ and ‘troisquain’ sounded funny to me) and is defined as a three-line stanza consisting of:
L1 – trochee-iamb-iamb-iamb
(DUM de de DUM de DUM de DUM);
L2 – iamb-iamb-iamb-iamb
(de DUM de DUM de DUM de DUM)
L3 – (indented) iamb-iamb 
(de DUM de DUM);
and it must contain alliteration between two consecutive stressed words in one of its lines,
and the final consonant sound of L2 must match that of L3(last two consonants,
if the last syllables of both end in two or more consonant sounds).
‘Paired Triquins’ specifically refers to two of these forming one six-line stanza,
with another variant allowed (only if one wishes) for the new L5, namely:
pyrrhic-spondee-iamb-iamb   (de de DUM DUM de DUM de DUM)
…and the additional requirement of having the 1st and 3rd DUMs of L2 rime the third DUM of L1,
and the 1st and 3rd DUMs of L5 rime the 2nd and 4th, respectively, of L4.
Syllabic schematic:
XxxXxAxX
xAxXxAxT
     xXxT [‘T’= terminal consonant]
XxxBxXxC
xBxXxCxT [or xxBXxCxT]
       xXxT

Example Poem

Mentor   (Paired Triquin Pair)
Scoundrels will scheme and squirm to make
you learn what you have spurned in past
    these tasks attest.
Welsh as this seems, it to’s been true
in dreams,  these I eschew sometimes,
     but not new forms.
Granted not gracing our fair bard
this hour would only sour myself.
    There’d be no riff.
Colleges fail,  but mentors don’t;
they’re hale and really won’t give up.
    They just can’t stop.
© Lawrencealot – June 20, 2013

Visual Template


Byr a Thoddaid

Byr a Thoddaid (beer ah TOE-thy’d), one of the 24 traditional Welsh

stanza forms, consists of four lines of syllable count 10/6/8/8

(or 8/8/10/6), rimed on last syllable except for the 10-syllable line,

 which has the main rime on the 7th, 8th, or 9th syllable with the

remainder set off by dash and either rimed within the 6-syllable

line or with its sequence of consonant-sounds repeated at the

start of the 6-syllable line, as above.

 

This poem has the Cynghanedd (consonance, harmony of sound)

required of Welsh bards, as detailed here:

 

http://allpoetry.com/column/7546199-Welsh_Poetry_-_Part_I_Cynghanedd_-by-Welshbard

 

 

Specifically, all but the last line of the first stanza

and the penultimate line of the second have Cynghanedd lusg

(trailing consonance), in which the accented penultimate syllable

 of the end-word is rimed earlier in the line

(the part of each 10-syllable line after the dash being excluded);

S1L4 and S2L3, then, both have Cynghanedd groes (cross-consonance),

 in which the second part of the line repeats the sequence of

consonant sounds in the first (end of last syllable of either

sequence can be ignored, as can n, while w and y the Welsh treat as vowels).

 

 

This form makes use of the gair cyrch in which the main rhyme appears somewhere near the end of a longer line and the end word is a secondary rhyme. The secondary rhyme is then echoed by alliteration or assonance in the first half of the next line.

  • stanzaic, written in any number of quatrains made up of 2 couplets,

  • syllabic, either L1-L2 8 syllables, L3 10 syllables L4 6 syllables, or the couplets are reversed L1 10 syllables, L2 6 syllables, L3-L4 8 syllables.

  • rhymed, either aaba with the main rhyme A occurring somewhere near the end of L3 and the secondary rhyme b echoed by alliteration or assonance in the first half of L4 or the couplets are reversed baaa.

 

 Potential

I know that my life’s potent– gauged not small–
gives notice of quotient
believed not achieved to extent
that make it thus, this man’s intent .

Say I, one day still invent– mankind’s balm–
Might call on all unspent
forces of mine formerly misspent
then would I feel good and content?

©  Lawrencealot – June 29,2012

Authors’s Notes

This poem has the Cynghanedd (consonance, harmony of sound)

required of Welsh bards, as detailed here:

Specifically, all but the last line of the first stanza
and the penultimate line of the second have Cynghanedd lusg
(trailing consonance), in which the accented penultimate syllable
 of the end-word is rimed earlier in the line
(the part of each 10-syllable line after the dash being excluded);
S1L4 and S2L3, then, both have Cynghanedd groes (cross-consonance),
 in which the second part of the line repeats the sequence of
consonant sounds in the first (end of last syllable of either
sequence can be ignored, as can n, while w and y the Welsh treat as vowels).
Please note the correction suggested in the comments below and navigate there
for a fuller treatment of this form.

This correction by Gary Kent Spain, aka, Venicebard on Allpoetry.

You might want to alter the Cynghanedd part of your AN here (lifted from one of my poems, which is okay except it is inaccurate with respect to your poem) to reflect the slightly looser form of Cynghanedd Groes (and echoing of the gair cyrch) you have aimed for in this poem.  The following link gives for C. Groes the stipulation that all that is necessary is repetition of the initial consonants of words, which is close to what you’ve tried to do here:

 

Related Welch form at HERE.

 

Visual Template of sorts
Byr a Thoddaid