Tulip

Pathways for the Poet by  Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source… Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Tulip is an invented verse form, a tetrastich with a combination of metric patterns. It was introduced by Viola Gardener.

The Tulip is:
○ a tetrastich, a poem in 4 lines.
○ metric, L1 & L3 are iambic pentameter, L2 i dimeter, a spondee followed by an amphibrach and L4 is dimeter, an iamb followed by an amphibrach.
○ rhymed abab.
○ because of the amphibrach foot at the end of L2 & L4 they have feminine endings.
Starbucks by Judi Van Gorder

The price of java going up and up
Good God! Horrendous!
The cost of coffee is four bucks a cup.
The line, tremendous!

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My Example

Another Birthday (Tulip)

I hope you’re happy, laughing and content.
Hail! Years are mounting.
It’s more important how your day is spent
than annual counting.

© Lawrencealot – September 28, 2014

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Tulip

Amaranth poetry form

Amaranth is an invented verse form that was probably created as a teaching tool by Viola Gardner. It makes deliberate use of the 9 most common metric feet. Each line is one metric foot, the pattern changing from line to line. 
The Amaranth is:
  • 9 lines strophe. It is a stand alone poem.
  • metric, the 9 most common metric feet are used in sequence.
    L1 Spondee SS
    L2 Iamb uS
    L3 Pyrrhic uu
    L4 Dactyl Suu
    L5 Trochee Su
    L6 Amphimacer SuS
    L7 Choriamb SuuS
    L8 Anapest uuS
    L9 Amphibrach uSu
  • rhymed at the discretion of the poet, although the metric restrictions are probably enough to contend with in this verse form.On the Cross by Judi Van GorderBehold!
    I am
    without
    sinfulness.
    Blameless,
    innocent
    guileless, bereft
    pleasing God
    forever.
With sincere thanks to Judi Van Gorder  for the above from the wonderful PMO site.
My Example Poem
Psychiatry     (Amaranth)
Wisecracks
are made
in the
analyst’s
office
shedding light,
clearing the way
for a true
discourse.
© Lawrencealot – November 27, 2013
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Tempo Composto

Tempo Composto means “time’s up” in Latin.

A form invented by L. Allen Bacon, aka Allen a Dale of Allpoetry.

The first three stanzas of a “tempo composto” are made up of
1) A Spondee (DA-DA)
2) two lines of Dactyl (DA-da-da)
3) 12 syllables free verse.

The fourth stanza differs in that the final line is only
4 syllables of free verse.

The rhyme pattern is
a-a-x-x
b-b-x-x
c-c-x-x
d-d-x-x

Looks good centered, but that is not a requirement.

Example Poem

Ride in the Country
Roadside
countryside
Lemonade
For sale sign draws me in to find they have just corn.
Quite hot!
Day is shot.
I have got
no lemonade. Drive on looking for the next stand.
Need gas,
Still I pass
twenty-one
stations looking for fruit stand, then run out of gas.
Walk back!
Station sez,
Out of gas,
Got lemonade.
(c) Lawrencealot – May 30, 2012
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