Choral Ode, Pindaric Ode or Dorian Ode

The Choral Ode, Pindaric Ode or Dorian Ode distinguishes itself from other odes because of its three part order. It is also strophic, not stanzaic like the Horatian, Keatsian and Ronsardian Odes. The strophe may differ in structure within the poem, while the stanza is uniform in structure within the poem. This verse form introduced by Pindar 522-433 BC Greece was originally written to be performed by chorus and dance and was therefore emotional, intense, brilliant and changeable to entertain an audience. Of course it like all Odes, exalts or praises its subject.

The names Choral and Pindaric Odes are obvious from the “choral” design of the frame and the name of the originator. The Dorians were one of the three tribes of ancient Greece who had their own dialect and culture. I couldn’t find Pindaric named as a Dorian poet but he did live in the same era so I am making an assumption there must be some association between the Dorians and Pindaric.

The verse is structured in a triad or three parts, which can be repeated within the poem. The parts are the strophe, the antistrophe, and epode. The individual parts are also referred to as the Turne, Counterturne and Stand. Originally created for a chorus from one side of the stage to sing or recite the strophe. The response or antistrophe is sung or chanted from the chorus on the other side of the stage. The triad is concluded by both choruses singing the epode. The strophe and antistrophe are written in exactly the same structure or frame, at the discretion of the poet. The epode must change in structure. This variation is meant to bring more drama to the ode.
To the immortall memorie, and friendship of that noble paire,
Sir Lucius Cary and Sir H. Morison by Ben Jonson

The Turne
BRAVE Infant of Saguntum, cleare
Thy coming forth in that great yeare,
When the Prodigious Hannibal did crowne
His rage, with razing your immortall Towne.
Thou, looking then about,
Ere thou wert halfe got out,
Wise child, did’st hastily returne,
And mad’st thy Mothers wombe thine urne.
How summ’d a circle didst thou leave man-kind
Of deepest lore, could we the Centre find !

The Counter-turne
Did wiser Nature draw thee back,
From out the horrour of that sack,
Where shame, faith, honour, and regard of right
Lay trampled on ; the deeds of death, and night,
Urg’d, hurried forth, and hurld
Upon th’ affrighted world :
Sword, fire, and famine, with fell fury met ;
And all on utmost ruine set ;
As, could they but lifes miseries fore-see,
No doubt all Infants would returne like thee.

The Stand
For, what is life, if measur’d by the space,
Not by the act ?
Or masked man, if valu’d by his face,
Above his fact ?
Here’s one out-liv’d his Peeres,
And told forth fourescore yeares ;
He vexed time, and busied the whole State ;
Troubled both foes, and friends ;
But ever to no ends :
What did this Stirrer, but die late ?
How well at twentie had he falne, or stood !
For three of his four-score he did no good.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/1251-the-choral-ode-pindaric-ode-dorian-ode/
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

Other Odes: Aeolic OdeAnacreontic Ode, Choral Ode or Pindaric Ode or Dorian Ode,
Cowleyan Ode or Irregular Ode, Horatian OdeKeatsian or English OdeRonsardian Ode

Thematic Odes:
Elegy, Obsequy, Threnody Ode
Elemental Ode
Genethliacum Ode
Encomium or Coronation Ode
Epithalamion or Epithalamium and Protholathiumis
Palinode Ode
Panegyric or Paean
Triumphal Ode
Occasional Verse

My example poem

Ode to Controlled Free Enterprise (Choral Ode)

Three cheers for private enterprise
where innovation’s raised our lot.
(Of course there’ve been a few bad guys)
whose selfish greed has fouled the pot.
In home garages ‘cross this land
both men and women made their mark
inventing things we now demand,
our lives made better by their spark.

Three cheers for Government control
to stop the business man that cheats,
with fleecing folks his only goal,
who pushes poisons on the streets.
Angels would never need such laws
but since we’re men there’s such a need
(to govern men who exploit flaws
of other men and thrive on greed.)

Though I’m learning I’m discerning
and it somehow seems to me
that to stifle business profits
will make everyone less free.
If the government restrictions
Place a levy that’s too high
then the companies will either
move away or simply die.
The electorate is charged with
the selection of a voice
whose agenda is not set but
who can think and make a choice.

© Lawrencealot – August 13, 2014

Clogyrnach

Clogyrnach clog-ír-nach, the 16th codified Welsh meter, an Awdl, is associated with what I can only assume is the name of an ancient poet, Cynddelw and is framed with a cyhydedd fer couplet combined with a longer form. It is rarely used by today’s poets.
The defining features of the Clogymach are:
  • stanzaic, written in any number of quintets, combining a cyhydedd fer *(a rhymed couplet of 8 syllable lines) and a tercet of two 5 syllable lines followed by one 6 syllable line of 2 equal parts, 3 syllables each.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme AABBA. The 1st phrase of L5 rhymes with the previous line and the 2nd phrase rhymes with cyhydedd fer couplet.
  • flexible, L5 of the cinquain can be added to the end of L4 creating a quatrain or can be broken into 2 separate lines creating a sixain.Clog Ear Nach by DC MartinsonInside my head there is a fight
    That leaves me void of sleep at night:
    My ear infected,
    By cure neglected.
    Dejected – Till dawn’s light.
x x x x x x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x x x B
x x x x B
x x B x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x x x B
x x x x B
x x B
x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x x x x x x A
x x x x B
x x x x B x x B x x A
Youth
Smooth lines with the color of peach,
time invites them to dream and reach.
Peer imitates,
lust lures, promise baits,
a world waits, ours to teach.
— Judi Van Gorder
Prism
Within the gemstone, facets glint
like sun on snow with winter’s tint,
sparkling colors fuse
in translucent hues
mark my muse with fired flint.
Judi Van Gorder
Many Thanks to PMO, a fine resource,  for  the above information.
*Technically the cyhydedd fir has internal and linked rhyme so I would simply omit that
designation, with the rhyme schemes shown.

Example Poem

 

Thanksgiving Pies     (Clogyrnach)

Wife’s made more pies than we’ll have guests

Her cooking ranks among the best.

I’m inept – thus banned

can’t cook things not canned,

Works great I must confess.

 

© Lawrencealot – November 27, 2013

Related Welch form at HERE.

Visual Template

Blitz Poem

  • The Blitz Poem is an invented verse form found on line at Shadow Poetry, it was created by Robert Keim. As the name implies it is a rush of phrases and images with rapid repetition as if creating a sudden and intense attack on the senses. It is a kind of twisted Chain Verse. The Blitz is:
    • stanzaic, written in 25 couplets, a total of 50 lines.
    • unmetered. Lines should be short, but at least 2 words, like rapid fire.
    • unrhymed.
    • composed with words that are repeated from line to line in the following pattern:
      • L1 A short phrase, can be cliché.
      • L2 The first word of L1 is repeated as the first word of L2. From here on, the last word of the even numbered line is repeated as the first word of each line in the next couplet through L48.
      • L49 is the repetition of the last word of L48.
      • L50 is the repetition of the last word of L47.
    • unpunctuated.
    • titled, which includes the first words of L3 and L47.
Many Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the above.
Here are the rules:
  • Line 1 should be one short phrase or image (like “build a boat”)
  • Line 2 should be another short phrase or image using the same first word as the first word in Line 1 (something like “build a house”)
  • Lines 3 and 4 should be short phrases or images using the last word of Line 2 as their first words (so Line 3 might be “house for sale” and Line 4 might be “house for rent”)
  • Lines 5 and 6 should be short phrases or images using the last word of Line 4 as their first words, and so on until you’ve made it through 48 lines
  • Line 49 should be the last word of Line 48
  • Line 50 should be the last word of Line 47
  • The title of the poem should be three words long and follow this format: (first word of Line 3) (preposition or conjunction) (first word of line 47)
  • There should be no punctuation
There are a lot of rules, but it’s a pretty simple and fun poem to write once you get the hang of it.
Many Thanks to Robert Lee Brewer for the above.
 
Example Poem:
 
Dudes to Party   (Blitz Poem)
pop some corn
pop some  tarts
tarts  tastes good
tarts needs heat
heat that tart
heat the cider
cider gets warm
cider smell invites
invites the neighbor
invites neighbor’s wife
wife is a tart
wife is a  friend
friend with benefits
friend indeed
indeed we’re swinging
indeed we’re singing
singing folksongs
singing Christmas Carols
Carol’s the wife
Carol’s now dancing
dancing on table
dancing with guys
guys like popcorn
guys like tarts
tarts are sweet
tarts get warm
warm the popcorn
warm the brew
brew some for me
brew some for you
you laugh and sing
you brought joy
Joy is single
Joy will mingle
mingle under mistletoe
mingle everywhere you know
Know she’s a tart
Know fun’s to start
start to hug
start to kiss
kiss the missus
kiss the miss
miss nothing
miss Trixie is here
here is the fun
here is the party
party on dudes
party hearty
hearty
dudes
© Lawrencealot – November 27, 2013
Visual Template
(Note: Template was not in compliance, the First word of the Title, must be the last word of the poem.

Amaranth poetry form

Amaranth is an invented verse form that was probably created as a teaching tool by Viola Gardner. It makes deliberate use of the 9 most common metric feet. Each line is one metric foot, the pattern changing from line to line. 
The Amaranth is:
  • 9 lines strophe. It is a stand alone poem.
  • metric, the 9 most common metric feet are used in sequence.
    L1 Spondee SS
    L2 Iamb uS
    L3 Pyrrhic uu
    L4 Dactyl Suu
    L5 Trochee Su
    L6 Amphimacer SuS
    L7 Choriamb SuuS
    L8 Anapest uuS
    L9 Amphibrach uSu
  • rhymed at the discretion of the poet, although the metric restrictions are probably enough to contend with in this verse form.On the Cross by Judi Van GorderBehold!
    I am
    without
    sinfulness.
    Blameless,
    innocent
    guileless, bereft
    pleasing God
    forever.
With sincere thanks to Judi Van Gorder  for the above from the wonderful PMO site.
My Example Poem
Psychiatry     (Amaranth)
Wisecracks
are made
in the
analyst’s
office
shedding light,
clearing the way
for a true
discourse.
© Lawrencealot – November 27, 2013
Visual Template

Jumping Rhyme

This form was invented by Amanda J. Norton

Monorhyme quintet with line length growing from 6 to ten syllables
Interlaced rhyme required for every line, starts with word two of line 1
then “jumps” up a word each line until the last,
where it jumps back one word.
Obviously the poet must not use large multisyllabic words that make this impossible

Line length is based on syllables, rhyme pattern is based on words – take care

Example Poem

Lets Dance   (Jumping Rhyme)

I propose that we dance
if your toes dare take a chance.
God only knows I cannot prance
and whirl like the pros, but there’s a chance
the closeness could dispose you to romance.

© Lawrencealot – December 9, 2012

Both Interlaced and end-rhyme are monorhyme
I think the following visual template will clarify:
Note: you cannot chart the interlaced rhyme in advance, as it is dependent upon the word size