Didactic cinquain

A Didactic cinquain is sometimes used by school teachers to teach grammar, is as follows:
Line 1: Noun
Line 2: Description of Noun
Line 3: Action
Line 4: Feeling or Effect
Line 5: Synonym of the initial noun

An alternate version of the cinquain poem, often called a “word cinquain” is based on words, instead of syllables. “Word cinquains” have the following pattern:

Line 1 1 word
Line 2 2 words
Line 3 3 words
Line 4 4 words
Line 5 1 word
Line 1 — a noun (a word that refers to a thing, such as apple or book or elephant).
Line 2 — two adjectives, or describing words, that tell the reader about that thing.
Line 3 — three words ending in -ing that are related to the thing, maybe saying what it does.
Line 4 — a four-word phrase (group of words) about the thing, or about the way it makes you feel.
Line 5 — another noun that is a synonym of (means the same as) the noun in line 1, or else is a different way of looking at that thing.
Pasted from <http://cinquain.net/>
My Example
Butch      (Didactic Cinquain)

Bulldog
solid, sturdy
snorting, panting, watching
always ready to be faithful
canine

© Lawrencealot – February 16, 2014

Diamante

A Diamante is a contrast poem of 7 lines, set up in a diamond shape.
The first line begins with a noun/subject,
and second line contains two adjectives that describe the beginning noun. 
The third line contains three words ending in -ing relating to the noun/subject. 
The forth line contains two words that describe the noun/subject and two that describe the closing synonym/antonym.
If using an antonym for the ending, this is where the shift should occur.
In the fifth line are three more -ing words describing
the ending antonym/synonym,
and the sixth are two more adjectives describing the ending
antonym/synonym. 
The last line ends with the first noun’s antonym or synonym.
To make it a bit simpler, here is a diagram.
Line 1: Noun or subject
Line 2: Two Adjectives describing the first noun/subject
Line 3: Three -ing words describing the first noun/subject
Line 4: Four words: two about the first noun/subject,
             two about the antonym/synonym
Line 5: Three -ing words about the antonym/synonym
Line 6: Two adjectives describing the antonym/synonym
Line 7: Antonym/synonym for the subject
Example Poem
Calm

Calm
quiet, undisturbed
soothing, refreshing, reassuring
composed,  tranquil, excited, impatient
upsetting, disturbing, unsettling
distressed, worried
Agitated.
(c) Lawrencealot – April 7, 2012