Choriambics

Choriambics
Type: Line, Metrical Requirement
Description: One of those complex Greek rhythmic patterns. It is a line consisting of two trochees, an iamb, a trochee, an iamb, a trochee, and two iambs.
Origin: Greek
Schematic: Xx Xx xX Xx xX Xx xX xX
Rhythm/Stanza Length: 2
Line/Poem Length: 16

Pasted from  http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/000/43.shtml
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

Choriambics by Algernon Charles Swinburne
              1  Love, what ailed thee to leave life that was made lovely, we thought, with love?
              2  What sweet visions of sleep lured thee away, down from the light above?
              3  What strange faces of dreams, voices that called, hands that were raised to wave,
              4   Lured or led thee, alas, out of the sun, down to the sunless grave?
              5  Ah, thy luminous eyes! once was their light fed with the fire of day;
              6  Now their shadowy lids cover them close, hush them and hide away.
              7  Ah, thy snow-coloured hands! once were they chains, mighty to bind me fast;
              8  Now no blood in them burns, mindless of love, senseless of passion past.
              9  Ah, thy beautiful hair! so was it once braided for me, for me;
            10 Now for death is it crowned, only for death, lover and lord of thee.
            11 Sweet, the kisses of death set on thy lips, colder are they than mine;
            12 Colder surely than past kisses that love poured for thy lips as wine.
            13 Lov’st thou death? is his face fairer than love’s, brighter to look upon?
            14 Seest thou light in his eyes, light by which love’s pales and is overshone?
            15 Lo the roses of death, grey as the dust, chiller of leaf than snow!
            16 Why let fall from thy hand love’s that were thine, roses that loved thee so?
            17 Large red lilies of love, sceptral and tall, lovely for eyes to see;
            18 Thornless blossom of love, full of the sun, fruits that were reared for thee.
            19 Now death’s poppies alone circle thy hair, girdle thy breasts as white;
            20 Bloodless blossoms of death, leaves that have sprung never against the light.
            21 Nay then, sleep if thou wilt; love is content; what should he do to weep?
            22 Sweet was love to thee once; now in thine eyes sweeter than love is sleep.

Pasted from <https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/html/1807/4350/poem2076.html>

Note: All of the examples I found were couplet rhyme, with stanzas greater than 16 lines. (Robert Brooke, Algernon Charles Swinburne)

 

My example  

Searching simply because questions demand answers has driven me
first, to question the “facts” dogma asserts, second to really see
serendipity take charge when we let nature control the dance.
Recognize that what’s here is and it’s prime! whether or not by chance.

(c) Lawrencealot – November 21, 2014

Medallion

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

Medallion is an invented verse form is a shape poem using predominantly trochaic meter. This form was created by Lilian Mathilda Svenson.

The Medallion is:
○ a poem in 9 lines.
○ metric, L1-L8 are trochaic and L9 is iambic. Syllables per line 4-7-8-7-9-10-9-7-4. As you can tell from the odd numbered syllable count of L2, L4, L5, L7 & L8, these lines are either catalectic or acephaletic (dropping either the end syllable or first syllable from the line). For this form, although it is not so instructed, the example poem is catalectic.
○ rhymed, rhyme scheme xabccbadd.
○ shaped. The poem should be centered on the page.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

My example

Summer Sears Us (Medallion)

Summer sears us
Makes autumn our next goal.
Fans are run to keep us cool.

Loud compressors whirr and hum 
while we wait for cooler days to come.
Winter’s cold kills homeless; keeps kids home from school, 
furnaces gulp gas and gobble coal.
Such a different song we sing, 
and pray for spring.

© Lawrencealot – September 18, 2014

Visual template

Medallion

Arabesque

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. I have included the syllabic invented forms on a separate page. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• Arabesque created by Lucille Evans features head rhyme (rhyme in the beginning of the line) in couplets. The end words rise and fall. 

The Arabesque is:
○ stanzaic, written in any number of couplets.
○ metered in pattern but no line length is required. The beginning metric foot of each line is a trochee Su, and the end foot of each line is alternately feminine and masculine.
○ rhymed, head rhyming couplets (rhyme at the beginning of the line).

Sample by Judi Van Gorder

Aching with a need to be sleeping,
making my fingers continue to type.
Writing a poem to be an example,
fighting fatigue to complete this tome.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

My example

Tavern Tango (Arabesque)

Mumble, drink beer and then grumble;
Stumble, your way through the door
Married men forgot their troubles,
Buried their unbidden woes.
Lookers have left without buying;
Hookers found men dumb and dull.

© Lawrencealot – September 1, 2014

Visual template

Arabesque

The Dobson

The Dobson is named for Henry Austin Dobson (1840-1921), 19th century English poet, patterned from his The Garden Song.  Dobson was respected in his time for his use of French forms especially his mastery of the Triolet.

 

The Dobson is:

  • stanzaic, written in any number of sixains made up of 3 rhymed couplets.
  • metered, most often written in tetrameter.
  • rhymed, rhyme scheme aabbcc ddeeff etc.

A Garden Song by Henry Austin Dobson

HERE in this sequester’d close
Bloom the hyacinth and rose,
Here beside the modest stock
Flaunts the flaring hollyhock;
Here, without a pang, one sees
Ranks, conditions, and degrees.

All the seasons run their race
In this quiet resting place,
Peach and apricot and fig
Here will ripen and grow big;
Here is store and overplus,–
More had not Alcinoüs!

Here, in alleys cool and green,
Far ahead the thrush is seen;
Here along the soutern wall
Keeps the bee his festival;
All is quiet else–afar
Sounds of toil and turmoil are.

Here be shadows large and long;
Here be spaces meet for song;
Grant, O garden-god, that I,
Now that none profane is nigh,–
Now that mood and moment please,–
Find the fair Pierides!

Pasted from <http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=668>
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the fine resource above.

 

My Example poem

Banana Peels (The Dobson)

Banana Peels

Bothersome banana peels
Getting underneath my heels
Possibly an oversight
or a trick that’s not polite.
Comics slide on them for fun,
clowns as well are not outdone.

© Lawrencealot – June 22, 2014

Visual Template

The Dobson

 

Trochetta

 This is a form created by Lisa La Grange
It is stanzaic, consisting of two or more quatrains
It is syllabic, 8/5/8/5
It is metric, all lines beginning with a trochee and an anpest,
And followed on the long lines with an amphibrach, giving this pattern:
DUM da da da DUM da DUM da
DUM da da da DUM
DUM da da da DUM da DUM da
DUM da da da DUM
The rhyme scheme is abab, where the a-rhymes are feminine.

The Trochetta, created by Lisa La Grange of Allpoetry.

(This had also been posted here by me, with the name: Trochee LaGrange.)

Stanzaic,              three or more quatrains

Syllabic,               8/5/8/5

Rhyme pattern:  abab(a-rhymes are feminine)

Meter:                  trochaic

 

My Example poem

 

Puppy Dreams     (Trochetta)

 PuppyDreams

Dogs do dream I have a notion-

dreams of pleasant things.

Mine can’t dream about the ocean

nor the pomp of kings.

Ocean’s spray he’s not discovered,

royalty’s abstract!

Grizzy burrows under covers

firm against my back.

Twitches might mean he is running

after his green ball;

Maybe he’s supine and sunning

waiting for my call.

© Lawrencealot – February 22, 2014

Visual Template
 

Swinburne Octain

This is a refrain poem, the form was one of many un-named forms invented by Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837-1909).

 I  have interpreted the specifications from looking at the work of one of Swinburne’s most dedicated students, AP’s own Eusebius.

 

There are at least TWO significant versions of an octain he created.  This first, presented here is  written in iambic meter, the second  written in trochaic.  The is the first:

 

Rhyming pattern: ABccabAB, where the capital letter indicate verbatim repetition of a line.

The “b” rhymes are all iambic trimeter,  all other lines  are feminine rhymes utilizing footless (or catalectic) iambic tetrameter.

Syllabic:  7/6/7/7/7/6/7/6

 

The first stanza, is repeated as the final stanza of the poem, thus it seems sensible that the minimum poem length should be at least four stanzas.

 

 

The Trochaic version is written with the Rhyming pattern: ababcccb

Syllabic: 9/8/9/8/9/9/9/8

 

The accent is as two trochee feet, an amphibrach and a trochee with all “b” rhymes being catalectic.

Example Poem

 The Tart (Swinburne Octain)

This tart so thin, bewitching,
with beauty, fay and pale.
Her tattoos all parading,
Her ebon curls cascading,
until I am just itching
to see her all in Braille.
This tart so thin, bewitching,
with beauty, fay and pale.

She seems an apparition
both siren myth and tramp,
who sells her pleasures cheaply
to those who want her deeply.
I feel I must audition
to win time with this vamp.
She seems an apparition
both siren myth and tramp,

Her long smooth legs inviting
all who may simply glance.
Though men might once demean her
they’ll dare not come between her
and one she is inviting.
Each man would like his chance.
Her long smooth legs inviting
all who may simply glance.

To me she whispered lightly,
“I’ll show you realms of love.”
Her word were most insightful
Her movements were delightful
I longed to have her nightly
beneath the moon above.
To me she whispered lightly,
“I’ll show you realms of love.”

This tart so thin, bewitching,
with beauty, fay and pale.
Her tattoos all parading,
Her ebon curls cascading,
until I am just itching
to see her all in Braille.
This tart so thin, bewitching,
with beauty, fay and pale. 

© Lawrencealot – June 17, 2013

 

 

Visual Template

 

 

 

7/5 Trochee Poetry Form

The 7/5 Trochee, created by Andrea Dietrich,
of 2 or more quatrain stanzas ( 8 lines or more)  with the following set rules:

Meter:  Trochaic
Syllabic: 7/5/7/5
Rhyme Scheme:  abcb or abab

The meter is trochee, which means alternating stressed and
unstressed beats in each line, with each line beginning and
ending in a stressed syllable. This is a simple lyrical type|little poem, so rhymes will be basic, nothing fancy.

The poem itself should give a description of something of interest to the poet.

There is not a set number of these quatrain type stanzas,

but a typical 7/5 Trochee would consist of two quatrains,

with the second stanza serving to tie up the idea presented in the first stanza.

Pasted from <http://www.shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/75trochee.html>

 Example Poem

Nap

Sleeping eight hours every night
Seems to some divine.
Choosing such is quite their right.
Just don’t make it mine.

 I will sleep that much or more.
taking smaller blocks.
For in afternoon I snore
Even wearing socks.

 

© Lawrencealot –  June 19, 2012
Visual Template
 
 

Chatushka

A Russian Quatrain form. The name derives from the Russian meaning ”to speak fast”. Covering subject that range across the whole human experience and written in a manner that is usually satirical, ironic or humourous this is the Russian equivalent to theLimerick.
 
Form Type:           Metrical
Origins:                 Russian
Creator:                Unknown
Number of Lines:  4
Rhyme Scheme:  a,b,a,b or a,b,c,b or a,a,b,b
Meter:                   Trochaic Tetrameter
 
 
Rules
1. The form is composed of a single quatrain, though often they are placed together with others in a string, in either case each quatrain is a complete self contained unit.
 
2. The most common rhyme scheme is a,b,a,b though a,b,c,b is also fairly common. The a,a,b,b rhyme scheme is fairly rare.
 
3. The form is written using trochaic tetrameter. Though it is common to use catalectic final feet in a line giving a strongly stressed ending.
 
4. Content wise Chastushkas cover all subjects, though the style is usually satirical, ironic or humourous, tending towards lewd,
 
5. Traditionally they are recited to music, if they are in a string then there is a musical interlude between them to give the audience time to laugh.
 
6. Often they are composed on the spur of the moment and used in contests, such Chastushka are highly prized.
 
Pasted from <http://bensonofjohn.co.uk/poetry/formssearch.php?searchbox=Chastushka> 

Get Back Chicken
Chicken, get back; don’t peck me
For the cleaver in my hand
Just think, could be, soon chopping thee.
Dinner captured, cleaned and panned.
 
© February 16, 2012
Dane Ann Smith-Johnsen
 
Written for Poetry Soup Member Contest: Chastushka Form-Russian Poetry 
 
 
Example Poems 

 
Three Chastushkas 

 
Mabel’s clothing at their feet
under chairs and kitchen table.
Freddy focused not on neat,
Freddy merely wanted Mabel. 

Scribbled thoughts upon a napkin
Serve as plans of grand intention.
Dreams without an active effort
freeze in idle cold suspension.

Anxious Arabs show misgiving
watching western people living.
letting females speak their voices
countermanding masters choices. 

 
© Lawrencealot –  January 23, 2013 

 
 
 
Visual Template
 
Actually not one of each, I omitted abab!

Octain Refrain

The Octain Refrain is a form invented by Luke Prater.  Learn more about Luke by visiting his blog at  www.lukeprater.com.
It comprises eight lines as TWO TERCETS and a COUPLET, either as octosyllables (counting eight syllables per line), or as iambic tetrameter, whichever is preferable. Trochaic tetrameter also acceptable. The latter yields a more propulsive rhythm, as opposed to iambs, which tend to lilt.
As the name suggests, the first line is a refrain, repeated as the last (some variation of refrain acceptable). Rhyme-scheme as follows –
Abb a(c/c)a bA
A = refrain line. c/c refers to line five having midline (internal) rhyme, which is different from the a- and b-rhymes. The midline rhyme does not have to fall exactly in the middle of the line, in fact it can be more effective and subtle, depending on context, to have it fall earlier or later.
Alternative layout/stanza-structure: TWO SINGLE LINES and TWO TERCETS
Refrain lines on their own, with the middle six as two tercets –
A bba (c/c)ab A
The High Octain is simply a double Octain, but as one poem – the refrains are the same, a- and b- rhymes are the same, but actual words are different, and the c/c line with the internal rhyme can optionally be rhymed in the second instance. There is no restriction on the level of repetition, but in most cases the stipulated refrain A is enough; this may even feel too repetitive and need varying. As a general guideline, changing up to four syllables of the eight still retains enough to feel like the refrain. The end word must remain the same.
The structure of the High Octain is one single after another with a break in between; alternatively, it can be written as two blocks of eight lines:
A-b-b-a-c/c-a-b-A
A-b-b-a-c/c-a-b-A [or d/d instead of c/c]  (I’ m sorry, but a d-rhyme without a c-rhyme makes no sense!)
It is also possible to write a piece consisting of a string of single Octains (the rhymes of which would not usually correspond).
Example Poems
 
 
Octane Refrain     (Octain)
 
My muscle  car needs high-octane. 
If jerk at pump should pump low test 
He’ll have a broken nose at best. 
 
From low octane I must refrain. 
It’s racing fuel to race you fool. 
but high-octane I must explain. 
 
That’s par for cars that run the best. 
My muscle  car needs high-octane. 
 
© Lawrencealot – June 19, 2012
 
 
Showers Wash the Stars  (Octain)
 
Springtime showers bringing rainbows 
 
Brightest sharpest color forming 
Glassine crystals grasslands warming 
Steam now rising; morning rain goes. 
 
Cleaned pavilion shines cerulean
promised now where stars refrain goes
Superb nighttime twinkle swarming.
 
Springtime showers bringing rainbows. 
 
 
New Year’s Eve     (High Octain)
 
When we were young we joined the crowd 
To walk the street in freezing cold, 
to greet the new; kick  out the old. 
 
To hear the fireworks booming loud, 
and watch their flight into the night, 
their light reflecting off a cloud. 
 
We’d be there when the bells were tolled. 
When we were young we joined the crowd. 
 
When we were young we joined the crowd 
on blocked off streets that were patrolled 
by cops on horses quite controlled. 
 
But now we’re older we’ve avowed 
to stay and see it on TV, 
that’s even if the streets are plowed. 
 
We have each other we can hold. 
When we were young we joined the crowd. 
 
   © Lawrencealot – December 30, 2012
 
Visual Templates
Note: In both cases the final four syllable will suffice for the refrain if the poet so desires.