Cyclus

• Cyclus is shape poem found in Pathways for a Poet, it attempts to create a cycling pattern by syllable count. It is attributed to Marvin Davis Winsett.

The Cyclus is:
○ a 12 line poem.
○ syllabic, syllables per line 2-4-6-6-4-2-2-4-6-6-4-2
○ unrhymed.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1001#cyclus
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Recalibrate Tomorrow (Cyclus)

Each day
begins anew
despite our baggage load.
Burdens accumulate –
seem thrust on us;
some are,
but most
we allow by
trying to please others.
Tomorrow pick only
what is fun to
carry.

© Lawrencealot – November 24, 2014

Cinquo

• The Cinquo is a half Crapsey Cinquain.

The Cinquo is:
○ a pentastich, a poem in 5 lines.
○ syllabic, 1-2-3-4-1 syllables per line.
○ unrhymed. 

Favored by jvg
pear
apple
banana
watermelon
grapes

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2008#cinquo
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Short

Short?
Heck yes.
Toward what end?
Brevity I guess.
Yep!

© Lawrencealot – November 22, 2014

Wheelchair Angel Style

Wheelchair Angel Style 
A new form of poetry created to honor 
Poet mike44  aka  Author  Michael L Schuh
Who we now know as the wheel-chair angel… 
It consists of 25 lines
Starting with head syllable count of 2/2/3/4/3/2/1/3 
to create the impression of the back of a man 
sat in his wheel chair
5/8/8/10/8/8/8/8/8/8/ these line represent the chair
Then 4/ 4/6/6/4/4 split to represent two wheels
Then a 10 syllable line to represents the ground
Content must include wheel chair. 
Created by Pat Simpson 3/10.2009

Pasted from http://the.a.b.c.of.poetry.styles.patthepoet.com/T2Z.html
Many Thanks to Christina R Jussaume for her work on the Poetry Styles site.

 

• The Wheelchair Angel Style is a poem that attempts to create silhouette shape of a man in a wheelchair. Found at Poetry Styles this invented verse form was introduced by Pat Simpson to honor poet, Michael L. Schuh and who suggests the content include reference to a wheelchair. It was found at Poetry Styles.

The Wheelchair Angel Style is:
○ a poem in 25 lines.
○ syllabic, 2-2-3-4-3-2-1-3 5-8-8-8-10-8-8-8-8-8-8 4-4-6-4-4 10. L20 thru L24 are split, to create the illusion of wheels.

x x
x x
x x x
x x x x

x x x
x x
x
x x x
x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x ——- x x
x x ——- x x
x x x —– x x x
x x ——- x x
x x ——- x x
x x x x x x x x x x

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1001#wheel
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example
Wheels (Wheelchair Angle Style)

Bodies
broken
or diseased
paralyzing
structural
muscles
thus
stealing our
means to move about.
So they built chairs that men could push, 
then chairs that we could move ourselves.
Self-propelled wheelchairs are being
replaced by electric powered models
augmented by smart control chips
which now enable longer trips.
The chairs get better every year
with models made for all terrain
and competing in rugged sports.
Power soccer’s the most extreme.
   For men                   won’t bow
 while mind                   still works
we have                     a life to live,
 wheelchairs                      assist
   and man                   persists.
Expect science to obsolete the chair.

© Lawrencealot – October 31, 2014

Triname or Triple Acrostic

Triname Acrostic is a combination Compound Acrostic and a Mesostich. It was introduced by Patricia A Farnsworth-Simpson. The title should be the same as the word spelled in the left margin.

Triname Acrostic is a combination Compound Acrostic and a Mesostich. It was introduced by Patricia A Farnsworth-Simpson. The title should be the same as the word spelled in the left margin.

The Triname is:

  • strophic, the number of lines written at the discretion of the poet.
  • metered at the poet’s discretion.
  • unrhymed.
  • composed with words spelled out by the first letter at left margin, the center and the right margin of the poem.

.
Sweet Kitty

Sx xx Kxx xP
Wxx xI xxU
Ex T xxxR
E xxxTxx xR
Tx Y xxxS

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?/topic/2192-invented-forms-from-poetry-styles/
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

Since There was no poem provided with the message characters above, I decided to write one.

Sweet Kitty Purrs

Sometimes a Kitten wakes me uP
With a soft Intimate miaoU
Edging closer To where I slumbeR
Earning thus The permit to purR
Then I say Yes! I love those soundS

© Lawrencealot – October 28, 1024

According to the specs, the title ought be “Sweet”.

Fialka

Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg (1977) is a book for and by educators. Classic poetic forms as well as many invented forms which appear to have been invented as teaching tools or exercizes for use in workshops or classrooms are included. Some of these invented forms I have found in use in internet poetry communities, a testament to their staying power. On this page I include the metric invented forms found there in which appear to be exclusive to the community of educators from whom Ms. Berg drew her support. I have yet to find these in any other source. …. Whether classroom exercise or sharpening your skill as a writer, some of these forms can be fun to play with.

• The Fialka is a strophic form with little restriction other than meter. The form was created by Viola Garner  20th century poet and educator. Fialka is Viola in Bohemian. 

The Fialka is:
○ strophic, may be written in any number of lines.
○ metric, written in amphibrach (short/long/short) trimeter.
○ unrhymed.

Open Blinds by Judi Van Gorder

We wake with the warmth of the sunshine
that falls without hesitant sureness
across our disheveled covers
and greets our awakening gently.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1199#dionol
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

 

Illuminating

Illuminating (Fialka)

When lightning’s descending with jagged
indifference, hurrying slowly,
with speed that’s astounding, can mankind’s
own reason then doubt what we’re part of?

© Lawrencealot – September 9, 2014

Visual template

Fialka

 

Waka

Waka
Type: Structure, Metrical Requirement, Other Requirement
Description: Quintet in syllables 5-7-5-7-7. The first two lines treat one subject, the second two treat another, and the last line is a refrain or paraphrase. The first two lines are a dependent clause, while the last three are independent.
Origin: Japanese
Schematic:
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxxxx
Rhythm/Stanza Length: 5

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/003/332.shtml
My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

_____

Researching, I found: that this is a general and ancient classification of Japanese poetry, where Wa means Japanese and Ka means poem. It differentiated poetry writing in their own language from that written in Chinese, which was the more formal method.

All of the following are then examples of Waka. But I shall persist
and write one specifically to the form indicated by Mr. Weatherford.

_____

Name                     Form                 Note
Katauta                 5-7-7                 One half of an exchange of two poemThas; the shortest type of waka
Chōka                    5-7-5-7-5-7…5-7-7
Repetition of 5 and 7 on phrases, with a last phrase containing 7 on.
Mainly composed to commemorate public events, and often followed by ahanka or envoi.
Numerous chōka appear prominently in the Man’yōshū, but only 5 in the Kokinshū.

Tanka                  5-7-5-7-7         The most widely-composed type of waka throughout history
Sedōka                 5-7-7-5-7-7     Composed of two sets of 5-7-7 (similar to two katauta).
Frequently in the form of mondōka (問答歌 “dialogue poem”?)

_____
or an exchange between lovers
Bussokusekika  5-7-5-7-7-7       A tanka with an extra phrase of 7 on added to the end

Pasted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waka_(poetry)

_____

Co-dependent? (Waka)

Men of power use
young women as their just due.
Groupies seek the light.
They will comply completely.
They’re quid quo pro dependent.

© Lawrencealot – August 30, 2014

The Anna

I found a few invented forms which appear to be exclusive to The Study and Writing of Poetry; American Women Poets Discuss Their Craft, 1983. The book is a collection of essays from 50 American women poets, each essay provides insights into a multitude of topics from poetic genres, stanzaic forms, to writing techniques. This book provided some addition insights and background information on several stanzaic forms that I thought I had researched fully. I liked this book, it pays attention to the details.

• The Anna was invented in honor of Arkansas, poet and news columnist, Anna Nash Yarbrough by James R. Gray of California. This creator suggests the theme for this metric verse be love.

The Anna is:
○ a heptastich, a poem in 7 lines.
○ metric, iambic pattern, L1 dimeter, L2 trimeter, L3 tetrameter, L4 pentameter, L5 tetrameter, L6 trimeter and L7 dimeter.
○ unrhymed. 

Vows by Judi Van Gorder

Within
a moment
filled with orchids
and sweet Savignon
we pledged our lives
forever
to love.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2008#anna

My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource. Alas in this case, she did not get the measure correct.

My example

Miles to Go Before We Slept (The Anna)

I traveled miles
because you tempted me
by voice and thought and written word.
My travels proved to be well worth the while
I fetched you home, and home
you made for me.

© Lawrencealot – August 22, 2014

Visual Template
The Anna

Quintet II

Quintet II
Type:  Structure, Metrical Requirement
Description:  A five-line syllabic form much like the cinquain with an extra syllable in each line: 3, 5, 7, 9, 3.
Schematic:
xxx
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxx
xxx
Rhythm/Stanza Length:  5
Line/Poem Length:           5

Pasted from http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/005/502.shtml

My thanks to Charles L. Weatherford for his years of work on the wonderful Poetrybase resource.

Unrhymed 5 line poem
Syllabic: 3/5/7/9/3

My example poem

Emulated (Quintet II)

He watches
everything you do
because you’re his grand-papa.
You know that’s true. Other’s watch you too.
Think of that.

© Lawrencealot – August 18, 2014

Oriental Octet

I found a few invented forms which appear to be exclusive to The Study and Writing of Poetry; American Women Poets Discuss Their Craft, 1983. The book is a collection of essays from 50 American women poets, each essay provides insights into a multitude of topics from poetic genres, stanzaic forms, to writing techniques. This book provided some addition insights and background information on several stanzaic forms that I thought I had researched fully. I liked this book, it pays attention to the details.

• The Oriental Octet is an invented verse form that appears to emulate the syllabic pattern of the tanka and haiku. It was created by James R. Gray who requests the theme of the poem be nature.

The Oriental Octet is:
○ an octastich, a poem in 8 lines.
○ syllabic, 5-7-5-7-7-5-7-5 syllables per line.
○ unrhymed.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=2008#anna
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

 

My example poem
Seasonal Re-Paving (Oriental Octet)

In summer nature
re-paves our concrete sidewalks
with purple berry
colors spread by walking feet
or drops apples to kick.
In winter nature re-paves
with snow, in fall with leaves, but
leaves walks be in spring.

© Lawrencealot – August 17, 2014

Alcaic Stanza poetry form

Alcaics “gives an impression of wonderful vigour and spontaneity”. The 1911 Edition Encyclopedia. The stanzaic form is attributed to the poet Alceaus 6th century BC and is an Aeolic classic meter.

Alcaics stanzaic form is:
• stanzaic, any number of quatrains may be written.
• metric, quantitative verse. The first 3 lines are 5 metric feet and the last line, 4 metric feet with a specific combination of trochees and dactyls. There are variations on the rhythm of the Alcaics quatrain but the following (one source refers to it as the dactyl Alcaic quatrain) seems to me the most common as demonstrated in Alfred Lord Tennyson’s Milton.

(acephalous refers to the missing 1st syllable of an iambic foot)

L1 & L2 acephalous iamb, 2 trochees and 2 dactyls;
L3 acephalous iamb, 4 trochees;
L4 2 dactyls 2 trochees in that order

Quantitative Verse
L-Ls-Ls-Lss-Lss
L-Ls-Ls-Lss-Lss
L-Ls-Ls-Ls-Ls
Lss-Lss-Ls-Ls

Milton Part I by Alfred Lord Tennyson 1891

O mighty-mouth’d inventor of harmonies,
O skill’d to sing of Time or Eternity,
God-gifted organ-voice of England,
Milton, a name to resound for ages;
Whose Titan angels, Gabriel, Abdiel,
Starr’d from Jehovah’s gorgeous armouries,
Tower, as the deep-domed empyrean
Rings to the roar of an angel onset–

Me rather all that bowery loneliness,
The brooks of Eden mazily murmuring,
And bloom profuse and cedar arches
Charm, as a wanderer out in ocean,

Where some refulgent sunset of India
Streams o’er a rich ambrosial ocean isle,
And crimson-hued the stately palm-woods
Whisper in odorous heights of even.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1250
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example poem

Middle Class Morass (Alcaics)

O Yes! The rich have bankable balances;
O Yes! they choose the candidate’s policies.
Not those for whom the dole is dribbled,
though they contribute the votes those men need.

© Lawrencealot – August 3 , 2014

Visual Template
(4 lines or multiple)

Alcaics