Badger’s Hexastitch

This form was found on PoetryMagnumOpus with the information below.  I will give full attribution to the creator when I can.
Badger’s Hexastich is a fun variation of the Crapsey Cinquain invented by our own Badger. It simply expands the cinquain to another line and 2 more syllables.
Badger’s Hexastich is:
  • a poem in 6 lines.
  • syllabic, 2/4/6/6/4/2.
  • unrhymed, optional rising and falling end-words.
reading,
rooted in mind,
not tasting ripe berries,
the oozing summer scent,
window open,
waiting
~~Phil Wood
First flight,
small granddaughter
visits Grandma with Dad,
Mom, brother and sisters
in soccer play-offs
back home.
Judi Van Gorder
My Example Poem
Growing
Fall down
consider tears–
crawl to where grandpa sits
grab onto grandpa’s leg
grin like a fox–
stand up
© Lawrencealot – February 16, 2014

Quintina

I noticed that there were two gaps in the series of Sestina-like poetry form.  This fills one of those.
Quintina  –
Keyword Requirement
Five line version of the Sestina with end-word enfolding.
Created by Lawrence R. Eberhart
Origin: USA
Schematic
12345
54231
21453
43512
35124
Envoy
12/345
Example poem
Will Google Know? (Quintina)Intelligent devices in each home,
has been a goal for Nest-they’ve led the way
with thermostats that learn their master’s wants
as actions tell them all they need to know.
Now Google bought Nest; you know what that means.

They’ve added sensors to their mining means.
What you like and frequently view they know
already. Photographs along the way
may show your house if any person wants
wants virtual travel on streets to your home.

Where you take pictures, they know by the way,
from cell-phone sensors when you leave your home,
and e-mail topic they already know
No cell or e-mail? This gives other means
to know some more about your daily wants.

They claim that privacy rules but you know
about a camel’s nose and growing wants
and Google tie-ins and just what that means.
The Nest products enhance a modern home,
providing cost-savings along the way.

If unconcerned for any one who wants
that data for less than scrupulous means
and one can spoof their own device at home
and benefit from pets another way
so sensors might not know just what they know.

Are you at home, or have you gone away?
If Google wants to know they’ll have the means.

© January 15, 2014 – Lawrencealot

Visual Template
Quintina

Canzone

I am simply including the inventor’s description here, but note, in my template, I have replaced the capital letters with numbers to indicate the chosen words.
I feel this is more conventional or soon should be.
Canzone
The canzone is an Italian form with strong similarities to the sestina. There are no rhymes; instead there are five keywords that determine the structure of the poem. Every line of the poem – and there are 65 lines altogether – ends with one of the keywords, which must appear in a prescribed order.
Here’s one I made earlier:
Bananas
As will be plain to people of good taste,
The least sense of the five is that of smell,
An adjunct merely to ones sense of taste.
Bananas, say, you know best by their taste.
The skin’s not that distinctive to the touch,
But no-one ever could mistake the taste!
That subtly tangy creamy fruity taste!
Now stick one in your ear. What do you hear?
Be honest – there is nothing there to hear.
The whole point of bananas is their taste.
And look at them – there’s not a lot to see.
A yellow boomerang – that’s all you see.
Although perhaps there is more you can see.
On second thoughts, perhaps sight rivals taste.
From looking at its colour, you can see
Whether it’s ripe enough to eat, and see
If it is over-ripe and rank. Though smell
Can tell you that as well, that I can see.
The shape is something else that you can see.
You could of course detect the shape by touch,
But that’s an overrated sense, is touch.
My policy’s believing what I see –
A pretty common one, from what I hear.
Though I don’t credit everything I hear.
You’re bats if you choose fruit by what you hear.
There’s no excuse for that that I can see.
But with a radio you need to hear.
That is the whole point after all, to hear.
With radios there is no role for taste;
It’s all about the programmes you can hear.
It’s true that maybe now and then you’ll hear
A programme on bananas and their smell;
Technology can’t help you smell the smell;
The smell must be evoked by what you hear.
There’s one potentially confusing touch
Called scratch-’n’-sniff – smell comes from what you touch!
Which proves, perhaps, the primacy of touch,
Though here it’s just augmenting what you hear.
In silent moments you can still use touch.
Bananas have some lovely bits to touch –
There’s more that you can feel than you can see.
The curve; which end is which; all told by touch.
To peel one you must use your sense of touch.
You have to peel the thing before you taste…
But there’s more to it than what you can taste.
If wiggled slightly, with a gentle touch,
It will trisect – releasing waves of smell.
The fifth sense, and the least, the sense of smell.
Still, few things are evocative as smell.
Though mankiness you can detect by touch,
It’s better for that to rely on smell.
You needn’t wash your hands if you just smell.
You ought to smell bananas first, d’you hear?
If they are good it’s quite a different smell,
A really very pleasant sort of smell,
And that’s why you should smell your fruit, you see.
It sometimes tells you things that you can’t see.
Bananas with the true banana smell
Are fruit that it is safe for you to taste.
That’s what it’s all about, of course – the taste.
Sometimes a poem leaves an aftertaste,
Some slight suspicion of a musty smell,
The nagging fear the poet’s lost his touch,
Acquired a wooden ear with with which to hear…
Such faults the bard himself can never see.
“Mankiness” may be a Britishism. “Manky” means “rotten, bad, nasty”. It comes from either Scots, or English dialect, or Polari (homosexual slang), depending on which dictionary you believe.
Anyway, as you see, there are five stanzas of twelve lines each, followed by a five-line envoi (which I am tempted to call a tornada, as for the sestina). The pattern of the keywords goes like this:
    stanza 1: ABAACAADDAEE
    stanza 2: EAEEBEECCEDD
    stanza 3: DEDDADDBBDCC
    stanza 4: CDCCECCAACBB
    stanza 5: BCBBDBBEEBAA
    envoi:      ABCDE
No particular line length or metre is prescribed.
Variations
Other structures are possible, apparently, but I have never seen any of them. The one used here is supposed to be the most common (in so far as any kind of canzone could be described as common).
Prescription
Anyone addicted to writing sestinas should be encouraged to write canzones instead, as a kind of aversion therapy. The canzone goes on too long to be enjoyable for either writer or reader, in my opinion.
A big thanks to Bob Newman for the fine Volecentral resource.
 
My example
 
Impatient Pleas     (Cazone)
 
Come lie with me you pretty, pretty thing,
and let us stop our toying with our words. 
Your flirting with me started off this thing 
and now my mind’s rejecting any thing 
but ideas of you- no other thoughts 
seem even to amount to anything 
because to lie with you’s the only thing 
that promises to make my soul my own. 
My mind minds not directions of my own 
for I most work and tell it that the thing 
I want with you can’t be the first and last 
thoughts each hour should I want my job to last. 
 
You’re such a curvy and becoming thing; 
you beauty leaves me lacking proper words. 
You are a woman for man’s betrothing 
for character shines through without sleuthing. 
although a lesser man may hold out thoughts 
that you would be the optimum plaything, 
once stripped of outer and underclothing. 
It is my plan to take you as my own 
while cognizant you’re not a thing to own. 
Instruct what I must do- I’ll do that thing. 
You’re smitten now, and I want that to last 
I’m not your first but wish to be your last. 
 
How can such ardor ever hope to last- 
It seems almost a supernatural thing? 
When we first kissed I thought “Oh,God! at last” 
I’ve lived, so now fulfilled, can breathe my last. 
Let Lethe leave behind those unsaid words 
for now I wish this mortal life to last 
for even should I find my soul will last 
I want to cherish you in more than thoughts. 
You must be bundled up with loving thoughts 
accumulated and well built to last 
so when the physical’s not ours to own 
your memories will conjoin with my own. 
 
This is the year that we should make our own 
I’ll build a future we’re assured will last. 
I’ll give you confidence that you will own 
all pieces of that heart I called my own. 
And parsing out my heart’s no little thing 
because it’s always only been my own 
and you may have it- while it’s still my own. 
You’ll not have to rely upon my words 
for acttions will be louder than mere words 
and bringing joy to you provides my own. 
So frequently I find you in my thoughts 
and frequently they’re very sexy thoughts. 
 
When we’re apart you’re with me in my thoughts 
and nature makes all scenery my own. 
The whispers leaves exchange are surely thoughts 
about your luscious form and babbling thoughts 
voiced by the chuckling stream recalls the last 
time it lapped where my illicit thoughts 
will wander although more productive thoughts 
would fit the scheme.  There’s no more sensual thing 
than promised passion- not a single thing 
comes close.  the anticipatory thoughts 
may eclipse the act and mock any words 
which may be writ, for they are only words. 
 
Just know that when you penned the pretty words 
of a sweet kingdom stirred, that my own thoughts 
already were in tune with just those words; 
there’ll be no pining there in other words 
for my impatience equal to your own 
confronts and overcomes delays, and words 
are not required to hasten me, though words 
from you are like a siren first and last 
that cannot be ignored.  I know you’ll last 
as long as I; I’m burning beyond words 
so hesitation will not be a thing 
permitted as you are my everything. 
 
Be anxious for that “touch of soft skin” thing. 
Do not expect a waste of time with words. 
A sensual script will emanate from thoughts 
when my urgency meets your very own 
Each time, I’ll feel like saying, “here at last”.
  

 

Visual Template
 
 

Quinzaine

  • The Quinzaine is an internet form found at Shadow Poetry and Instant Poetry for Kids, named from the French qunize (fifteen) for the 15 syllables the poem contains.The Quinzaine is:
    • a tristich, a poem of 3 lines.
    • syllabic, 7/5/3 syllables per line.
    • unrhymed.
    • composed of: L1 a statement, L2 and L3 questions related to the statement.Keats by Judi Van GorderPoet writes in present tense.
      When is verse in time,
      is now then?
Thanks to Judi for the fine source at PMO.
My Attempt at Example
Insanity Defense      (Quinzaine)
Right and wrong are human judgments.
Can incapable man
do no wrong?
© Lawrencealot – December 5, 2013

Kimo

  • There should be no movement in the imagery.The Kimo is:
    • a tristich, a poem of 3 lines.
    • syllabic 10/7/6 syllables per line.
    • unrhymed.
  • My Dog Angel by Judi Van GorderCoffee grounds and egg shells on kitchen floor
    next to overturned trash pail,
    Angel sleeping nearby.
Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for all her work on the PMO resource.

 

My attempt
“The Yard’s Done”     (Kimo)
Backyard neat with no unraked leaves in sight
rake leaning against tree trunk.
No tracks in fresh snowfall.
© Lawrencealot – December 3, 2013

Haikuette

  • The Haikuette is another seemingly, American answer to the haiku and was introduced by Louise Sipfle in the Caulkins Handbook and included in Berg’s Pathways…
    The Haikuette is:

    • a tristich, a 3 line poem. Each line must be a separate entity, yet must contribute to the whole.
    • syllabic, 17 syllables or less. There is no specified syllable count per line.
    • written without verbs.
    • unrhymed.
    • titled.
      You by Judi Van Gorder
      fresh freckled Lily
      sweet fragrance, pink and spicey
      your face in the sun
A big thanks to the efforts for Judi Van Gorder for a wonderful resource at PoetryMagnumOpus
Example Poem

Brrrr!

early morning frost
etched crystalline windshield designs
frown on your face

© Lawrencealot – November 28, 2013

Dixdeux

  • DixdeuxFrench for ten-two, is illustrated by Anthony Fusco in Caulkins’ Handbook on Haiku and Other Form Poems, 1970 . . . It appears to have developed as an alternative to the Haiku.The Dixdeux is:
    • written in any number of tercets. When written in more than one tercet, L3 becomes a refrain.
    • syllabic, with 10/10/2 syllables per line.
    • is unrhymed.
    • titled, unlike the haiku.
    • ————– Hot Topic by Judi Van Gorderan unopened coke sits in closed up truck
      outside the summer temperature rises
      ————– KABOOM!
      sticky brown liquid spatters upholstery
      meticulous owner finds mess inside
      ————– KABOOM!
Thanks to Judi Van Gorder of PMO for reseacrhing this.
My Attempt

Thanksgiving Day Football      (Dixdeux)

The aroma of turkey, panoply
of pies, threaten little distraction to
The game.

Living room furniture placed horseshoe style
in front wide-screen keeping kids away from
The game.

© Lawrencealot – November 27, 2013

Blitz Poem

  • The Blitz Poem is an invented verse form found on line at Shadow Poetry, it was created by Robert Keim. As the name implies it is a rush of phrases and images with rapid repetition as if creating a sudden and intense attack on the senses. It is a kind of twisted Chain Verse. The Blitz is:
    • stanzaic, written in 25 couplets, a total of 50 lines.
    • unmetered. Lines should be short, but at least 2 words, like rapid fire.
    • unrhymed.
    • composed with words that are repeated from line to line in the following pattern:
      • L1 A short phrase, can be cliché.
      • L2 The first word of L1 is repeated as the first word of L2. From here on, the last word of the even numbered line is repeated as the first word of each line in the next couplet through L48.
      • L49 is the repetition of the last word of L48.
      • L50 is the repetition of the last word of L47.
    • unpunctuated.
    • titled, which includes the first words of L3 and L47.
Many Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the above.
Here are the rules:
  • Line 1 should be one short phrase or image (like “build a boat”)
  • Line 2 should be another short phrase or image using the same first word as the first word in Line 1 (something like “build a house”)
  • Lines 3 and 4 should be short phrases or images using the last word of Line 2 as their first words (so Line 3 might be “house for sale” and Line 4 might be “house for rent”)
  • Lines 5 and 6 should be short phrases or images using the last word of Line 4 as their first words, and so on until you’ve made it through 48 lines
  • Line 49 should be the last word of Line 48
  • Line 50 should be the last word of Line 47
  • The title of the poem should be three words long and follow this format: (first word of Line 3) (preposition or conjunction) (first word of line 47)
  • There should be no punctuation
There are a lot of rules, but it’s a pretty simple and fun poem to write once you get the hang of it.
Many Thanks to Robert Lee Brewer for the above.
 
Example Poem:
 
Dudes to Party   (Blitz Poem)
pop some corn
pop some  tarts
tarts  tastes good
tarts needs heat
heat that tart
heat the cider
cider gets warm
cider smell invites
invites the neighbor
invites neighbor’s wife
wife is a tart
wife is a  friend
friend with benefits
friend indeed
indeed we’re swinging
indeed we’re singing
singing folksongs
singing Christmas Carols
Carol’s the wife
Carol’s now dancing
dancing on table
dancing with guys
guys like popcorn
guys like tarts
tarts are sweet
tarts get warm
warm the popcorn
warm the brew
brew some for me
brew some for you
you laugh and sing
you brought joy
Joy is single
Joy will mingle
mingle under mistletoe
mingle everywhere you know
Know she’s a tart
Know fun’s to start
start to hug
start to kiss
kiss the missus
kiss the miss
miss nothing
miss Trixie is here
here is the fun
here is the party
party on dudes
party hearty
hearty
dudes
© Lawrencealot – November 27, 2013
Visual Template
(Note: Template was not in compliance, the First word of the Title, must be the last word of the poem.

choka

Choka
The most intricate Japanese Poetry form is the Choka, or Long Poem.
The early form consisted of a series of Katuata joined together. This gives a choice of form structures of
5/7/5/5/7/7… etc.  or  5/7/7/5/7…etc
The Choka could be any total line length and indeed many exceeded 100 lines.
Looking at this, it is easy to see why Poetic Historians believe the Katuata is the original basic unit of Japanese poetry using either the 17 or 19 unit onji.
Another interpretation –
Choka
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, Simple
Description:
The choka is a Japanese form of unrhymed alternating five and seven syllable lines that ends with an extra seven syllable line. It can be any odd number of lines.
Origin:
Japanese
Schematic:
A nine-line choka would be:xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxxxx
The choka (長歌 long poem) was the epic, story telling form of Japanese poetry from the 1st to the 13th century, known as the Waka period. Storytelling was rare in the Japanese language during the Waka period although it is found in the Man’yôshû and even the Kokinshú. Most often the Japanese poet would write epics in classical Chinese. Still, the occasional poet with a story to tell would tackle the choka, the earliest of which can be traced back to the 1st century. It describes a battle and is 149 lines long.
Originally chokas were sung, but not in the Western sense of being sung. The oral tradition of the choka was to recite the words in a high pitch.
I always check this site for confirmation when cross-checking forms Judi Van Gorder has done a remarkable job for PMO.
Choka
Type:
Structure, Metrical Requirement, Simple
Description:
The choka is a Japanese form of unrhymed alternating five and seven syllable lines that ends with an extra seven syllable line. It can be any odd number of lines.
Origin:
Japanese
Schematic:
A nine-line choka would be:xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxx
xxxxxxx
xxxxxxx
Definition
The most intricate Japanese Poetry form is the Choka, or Long Poem. 
The early form consisted of a series of Katuata joined together. This gives a choice of form structures of ….. 5 – 7 – 7 – 5 – 7 – 7.. etc, or .. 5 – 7 – 5 – 5 – 7 – 5.. etc.
Example
The Moth 
there is no freedom
escaping from my cocoon
I must seek you once again
I am drawn to you
like a moth to a candle
circling nearer and nearer
the deadly flame calls
now my wings are scorched
why must my nature be so?
Specifications, Restated: 

Origin:                          :  Japanese
The form is syllabic : 5/7/7/5/7/7   or  5/7/5/5/7/5
Traditional style       : Stanzas consisting of any number of the above structures (called Katuata)
or  alternaively        : Alternating five and seven syllable lines that end with an extra 7 syllable line.
Unrhymed.
Meant for longer poems. 

I have written a one using the Katuata style.
Poem Sample
Above the Sun (choka) Katuata Version

setting out with you
in late summer’s rising sun
hastens Honchu’s heat
yet our packs hold coats
which hold nourishment for us
for cold nights ahead.
many foreigners
pass and are passed as we climb
the holy mountain;
all are of like mind-
to climb to Mount Fuji’s peak
for spiritual joy.
We begin our last
ascent early in the night-
cold now, velvet sky
lightens, bows to rising sun.
We watch from above, awed.

© Lawrencealot – November 23,2013

Visual Templates.
(with Thanks to Judi, I used her poem to depict the alternating line version)

Faceted Diamond

The poems that I have documented for this category  include
Trick Poetry                           (four in one – OR many more)
and  Amera’s Style                (2 in one ), both on this page
The Trigee and the Cleave  (three in one)
The Faceted Diamond         (three in one – formatted)
Multidirectional Sonnet     (2 in one)  In Everysonnet blog.
Constanza (two in one)
 
 
  • Faceted Diamond is a verse form that is probably as complicated to read as to write. It is an invented form found at Poetry Base and was invented by American poet Cory S Sylvester. Like the Cleave and the Trigee there are 3 poems in 1 but unlike the others, the reader may need clues to understand how to read the 3.
    The Faceted Diamond is:

    • 3 poems in 15 lines.
    • syllabic: 1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/7/6/5/4/3/2/1. The even # lines break half way. (Poetry Base suggests the poem could be longer as long as it is an odd number of lines, but I am not going there. You can check with Poetry Base if you are curious.)
    • unrhymed.
    • centered on the page.
      x
      x — x
      x x x
      x x — x x
      x x x x x
      x x x — x x x
      x x x x x x x
      x x x x — x x x x
      x x x x x x x
      x x x — x x x
      x x x x x
      x x — x x
      x x x
      x — x
      x
    • The poem can be read in whole and…
    • A second poem can be read by reading the odd numbered lines and the first half of the even numbered lines and ….
    • A third poem can be read by reading the odd numbered lines and the second half of the even numbered lines. All 3 poems should make sense.
 
My Thanks to Judi Van Gorder of PoetryMagnumOpus for the above.
 
Example Poem
 
Only I     (Faceted Diamond)
Wait
my dear
lovely one
can you pause and
observe men that stare
openly without shame
wishing it were they, not me
tending to you, taking you home,
and ending the evening
in your arms,kissing you.
and all of the time
I know they know
they can’t have
my dream
love.
© Lawrencealot – September 23, 2013
Visual Template