Palidrome Poetry

Palindrome Poetry
Also Known as Mirrored Poetry   (See also Tuanortsa  Trick Poetry).

A palindrome, by definition, is a word, phrase, verse, sentence, or even poem that reads the same forward or backward. It stems from the Greek word palindromos: palin, meaning again, and dromos, meaning a running. Combining the two together, the Greek meaning gives us, running back again…

Example Poem

Time to Caucus

Grumble and hollar and growl and mumble.

Mad and agitated was I glad?

Tumble and hoot now so bumble.

Bad events population sad,

bet placed folks upset yet

long faces folks wrong.

Yet good things get.

Throng in song.

One done

Won.

Done one

song in throng;

get things good yet.

Wrong folks faces long

Yet upset folks placed bet.

Sad population events bad

Bumble so now hoot and tumble

Glad I was agitated and mad!

Mumble and growl and hollar and grumble.

© Lawrencealot  – April 12, 2012

Sedoka

The Sedoka is an unrhymed poem made up of two three-line katauta
 with the following syllable counts: 5/7/7, 5/7/7.
A Sedoka, pair of katauta as a single poem,
may address the same subject from differing perspectives.
Katauta is an unrhymed three-line poem with
the following syllable counts: 5/7/7.

Example Poem
Getting Trained

Baby learning speech
“Lo, Papa”, points down to floor.
I look for object on floor.

“No, grandpa”, say mom.
The baby wants you closer
She wants you to “Stand there please.”

Sestina – Conventional

The sestina (less commonly, though more correctly, sextain) is a wondrous strange beast, the brainchild of a twelfth-century Provençal troubador. It doesn’t use rhyme; instead, it has six keywords essential to the poem’s structure. The poem’s 39 lines – six 6-line stanzas followed by a 3-line envoi or tornada – all end with one of the keywords; in the tornada, there are two keywords in each line, one of them at the end and the other somewhere in the middle. It may all begin to make sense if we try an example.
stanza 1: 123456
stanza 2: 615243
stanza 3: 364125
stanza 4: 532614
stanza 5: 451362
stanza 6: 246531
This is the prescribed order for a sestina – at least, for an unrhymed one. (Yes, there are rhymed ones too. This is a variation dealt with later.) No deviation from this order is tolerated.
However, there are several different possible orders for the keywords in the tornada (“tornada schemes“).
The popular schemes are 12/34/56, 14/25/3625/43/61 and 65/24/31. Pretty well anything goes, really.
You’ll notice that each keyword appears once in the first line of a stanza, once in the second line of a stanza, and so on. You may also notice that the permutations of the keywords follow a regular pattern. It’s all a bit like bell-ringing. Or mathematical group theory, for that matter.
At 39 lines, the sestina is eligible for poetry competitions with a 40-line limit. (Perhaps they used to have a lot of those in Provence.)
The greatest thanks to Bob Newman of Volecentral for this.  His site is an excellent resource.
My Example
Forget Me, She Said ( A Sestina)
I forgot to remember you had left.
Your need to grow required that you must go
find space unoccupied.  I neither made
you whole nor satisfied your unquenched thirst.
“Just forget me; go play and have some fun,”
You told me, “You’re a prize for someone new.”
I’d never even wanted someone new
and still did not, once you had really left.
My love for you, I should replace with fun
and sparkle like a dandy on the go.
“Just forget me; let hotties quench your thirst.
You’ll be the grandest catch that someone’s made.”
Attempts to dissuade you were often made
for weeks while you sought something somewhere new.
But only total change could quell your thirst.
And memories were all that I had left.
Without sharia law you’re free to go
and with it, holding you would be no fun.
Then, for my boys, I dated, and had fun.
I was astounded by the progress made
as I was learning dating on the go.
Once my small son asked “Will she be our new
mommy?” At least he’d realized you’d left.
I began courting with a new found thirst.
Forever buoyed by an abiding thirst
for laughs enjoyed when shared, my quest was fun.
I laid my love for you aside. That left
a vacancy and soon fresh feeling made
inroads to my reluctant heart and new
responses sang as guilt began to go.
Your leaving forced me to let my love go
as death could not have done.  So, now a thirst
was normal and not faithless search for new
absolution perhaps just based in fun.
When not allowed to keep the promise made
New love was deemed okay because you left.
The fact you had to go was never fun.
I hope you’ve quenched the thirst inside that made
you leave. I’ve loved in new ways since you left.
Visual Template
 
 

SIJO

SIJO  (from Shadow Poetry Handbook)
A short Korean poetry form consisting of three lines,
each line having a total of 14-16 syllables in four groups
ranging from 2 to 7 (but usually 3 or 4) syllables, with a natural pause at the end of the second group and a major pause after the fourth group.

The third line often introduces a resolution, a touch of humor, or a turn of thought.

Nature is often the subject matter of these poems like traditional haiku.”

Either narrative or thematic,
this lyric verse introduces a truth (perhaps a problem) in line 1,
development (called a turn) in line 2,
and a strong conclusion beginning with a surprise (a twist) in line 3,
which resolves tensions or questions raised by the other lines
and provides a memorable ending.

 

Example Poem

Surprise Test

Trained by nature over time, learned and changed my DNA.
Teacher springs surprise exam; tough, could be season ending.
Snow bonnet fends off freezing adds resilience to my beauty.
 (C) Lawrencealot – July 23, 2012
Visual Template

Sonnetina Uno

SONNETINA UNO
A ten line poem
Requires: IAMBIC PENTAMER using BLANK VERSE
Example Poem
Interlude (Sonnetina Uno)
The winter settled down, it’s artwork done,
The thermometer dropped stopping the snow
and holding for us still-life clearly cast.
The roads were all cleared; a recess was called
for visitors to take pictures to share.
A suspension of time, deferring spring,
with frigid heart-warming inversion felt
as still air-motionless, and mutely crisp.
While not every year is such a scene seen,
these days are treasures wrought for memory’s sake.
© Lawrencealot – January 4, 2013
Visual Template

Triquain

Triquain…created by Shelley Cephas,
A Triquain is a seven line poem with syllables in multiples of 3 as follows:
3, 6, 9, 12, 9, 6, 3 This form is always centered.
syllabic,3/6/9/12/9/6/3,unrhymed,7 lines
ALWAYS Centered
 
 
Example Poem:
 

Interim Heaven  (Triquain chain – Cephas) 

 
The puppy
brought to the hospital
where the boy was dying adopted
him on first sight.  The lad’s pain was subdued by drugs.
Nothing could subdue the instant joy
filling him as he hugged
The puppy.
 
The cancer
would not relent, and yet
the boy’s eyes were brighter than before
and he never cried another day.  The puppy
snuggled when he slept and licked his face;
played gently other times
with the boy.
 
When the boy
passed on while he slept, the
puppy knew and whined, parents wept.  In
tears a younger brother took the pup, who shut up
and licked away that boy’s tears.  Wiping
grief away, replacing
it with love.
 
(c) Lawrencealot – May 7,2012
 
 
Visual Template:

As it happened, the Triquain above was the first one that I encountered.
It was not however, the first form given the name.

• The Triquain, found in Berg’s Pathways for the Poet 1977 appears to be an attempt at combining the haiku and Crapsey cinquain. It was created by L. Stanley Cheney and referred to in both the Caulkins’ Handbook and Pathways. This form comes a little closer to the purpose of haiku than some other haiku wannabees. There is another invented form also called a Triquain that appeared on the internet about 25 years later written in a syllabic heptastich.

The Triquain is:
○ a tristich, a poem in 3 lines. It is composed in 3 units, L1 introduces the subject, L2 expands and leads into action, L3 is the enlightenment or question.
○ syllabic, with 2-7-7 syllable count per line.
○ Titled, unlike the haiku.

stud by Judi Van Gorder

newborn
leggy colt struggles to stand
first of many challenges

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1188#triquain
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Inquiry (Triquan-Cheney)

questions
preceding words, as babble
most unanswered before death

(c) Lawrencealot – October 29, 2014

 

Tritina

The pattern of word-repetition is as follows, where the words that end
the lines of the first tercet are represented by the numbers “1 2 3”:
  1 2 3          – End words of lines in first tercet.
  3 1 2          – End words of lines in second tercet.
  2 3 1          – End words of lines in third tercet.
  (1 2 3)        – Words contained in the final line.
Your Composition.
The repetition of words in a Tritina makes this form a good match for
a story that uses common speech, for in conversation the repetition
of key words is common. The Tritina is a more “natural” form than the
Villanelle (which is comparatively artificial in repeating whole lines)
and the Sestina (which is significantly more challenging because it is
longer (39 lines) and reuses six words
in six six-line stanzas and a closing tercet).
Example Poem
Fido
I have  always liked dogs.
Almost all dogs I like.
And almost all like me.
Their faithfulness moves me.
I prefer smaller dogs
‘Cus big poop, I  don’t like.
Of course I  still do like
gals who are nice to me.
as long as they like dogs.
I like dogs;  dogs like me.
Visual Template

Vignette Form

The Vignette is also the name of a syllabic invented verse form introduced by Fozari Rockwood found in Pathways for the Poet by Viola Berg,1977.
The Vignette is:
a hexastich, an unrhymed poem in 6 lines.
syllabic: 2/4/4/6/7/3  syllables per line.
Example Poem:

Activities Director ( Vignette form )

Supine,
reading a book.
My yorkie drops
his chew ball upon my
chest, holds it with one paw; quiet
bark, “Let’s go.”