a la Bartholomew Griffin

a la Bartholomew Griffin is a poetic device, technique or tool. This technique is sometimes used as an exercise in repetitive end words in workshops and classrooms. Named for English poet Bartholomew Griffin (died 1602) from two of his 150 sonnets which were written with the end word repeated throughout the poem. This is considered Griffin’s literary contribution to technical form. The device is usually used in light verse and does not necessarily adhere to the original sonnet structure used by Griffin.

a la Bartholomew Griffin is:
• light verse.
• short. A poem written in 14 lines or less.
• metered or not at the discretion of the poet.
• written repeating the same end word throughout the poem.

SONNET 23. (published 1596) by Bartholomew Griffin

Fly to her heart ! Hover about her heart !
With dainty kisses mollify her heart !
Pierce with thy arrows her obdurate heart !
With sweet allurements ever move her heart !
At midday and at midnight, touch her heart !
Be lurking closely, nestle about her heart !
With power (thou art a god !) command her heart !
Kindle thy coals of love about her heart !
Yea, even into thyself, transform her heart !
Ah, she must love ! Be sure thou have her heart !
And I must die, if thou have not her heart !
Thy bed, (if thou rest well) must be her heart !
He hath the best part sure, that hath her heart,
What have I not ? if I have but her heart !


Write On by Judi Van Gorder

I ask, is this right?
I thought the right
way of it was truly right
in front of me. Right
next to the selected, right
book of verse at the right
hand of my desk. Write?
That word ‘s not right.

Pasted from http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=1103
My thanks to Judi Van Gorder for years of work on this fine PMO resource.

My example

Unexcused Absence (a la Bartholomew Griffin)

The poet needed an excuse
The missing muse was not excuse
enough he thought he ought excuse
his muse; he thought, “No, there’s no excuse
to give my muse an excuse to excuse!”

© Lawrencealot – November 9, 2014

RemyLa Rhyme

The RemyLa Rhyme Form, a form created by Laura Lamarca, consists of 4 stanzas. 
Each stanza has four lines.
 The syllable count per stanza is 8/10/12/8 and
 the rhyme scheme is abca defd ghig jklj. (abcadefdghigjklj)
The first word of stanza 1 must also be the last word of stanza 4. 
The last word of stanza 1 must also be the first word of stanza 2 and the last word of stanza 2 must be the first word of stanza 3.
Finally, the last word of stanza 3 must also be the first word of stanza 4.
J1, x, x, x, x, x, x, a
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, b
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, c
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, A1 

A1, x, x, x, x, x, x, d
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, e
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, f
x, x, x, x, x, x , x, D1 

D1, x, x, x, x, x, x, g
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, h
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, i
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, G1 

G1, x, x, x, x, x, x, j
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, k
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, x, l
x, x, x, x, x, x, x, J 

Example Poem 

Cant Kick 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Pants hanging around our butt-crack
We met, said “Howdy”, got a bit rowdy
We’d rather play street ball, bounding and bouncing here
than go to the gym or the track.

Track my progress and you will find
I’m a kicker- and no one is quicker.
I simply own this ball game when played on this block.
I’m double-teamed and I don’t mind.

Mind you that’s in this neighborhood.
Today we we’re aiming at taming foes
that kick a wicked ball in Homer’s home ground.
There’s never been a doubt they’re good.

Good enough to stand a real chance.
With me doubled and tripled we did lose.
A loss costs the losers a high-wire pair of shoes.
Next time it could cost me my pants.

(Lawrencealot – June 22, 2012

Visual Template

Mirror Sestet

The Mirror Sestet, created by Shelley A. Cephas, is a poem that can be
written in one or more stanzas of 6 lines each. The specific guidelines for
this form are as follows:
The first word of line 1 rhymes with the last word of line 1.
The first word of line 2 is the last word of line 1 and the
last word of line 2 is the 1st word of line 1.
The first word of line 3 rhymes with the last word of line 3.
The first word of line 4 is the last word of line 3 and the
last word of line 4 is the 1st word of line 3.
The first word of line 5 rhymes with the last word of line 5.
The first word of line 6 is the last word of line 5 and the
last word of line 6 is the 1st word of line 5.
The Mirror Sestet can also be written in non-rhyme.
All rules must be followed except there is no 1st and last word rhyming.
Example Poem
It Worked
“Turds like him can speak in fancy words.
Words that  promise much. Those phony turds.
Great gods I fell for it.”  Here I wait,
Wait for Merlin to do something great.
“Smile for then he’ll make it worth your while.
While there, he’ll match figure to your smile.”
Visual Template

Partenza Represa

The Partenza Represa created by: Dawn Slanker
It contains any number of four line stanzas which can rhyme or not rhyme
depending on preference. The most important features of this form are that
it maintains strict syllable line count of your choosing:
8*6*8*6, 8*8*8*8, 10*10*10*10, etc…and that each line must begin
(anywhere you like) with the last portion of the preceding line.
Also, it’s important to point out that you have the option of either
continuing the first line of each stanza with a refrain from the line
preceding it or you may choose to begin an entirely new line for each stanza.
IMHO that makes this one of the most versatile forms I have yet addressed:

Any meter, any line length, any or no rhyme, word refrains

Example Poem

They Fart Melodies

Some folks believe their shit don’t stink.
Their shit don’t  stink, some people think.
Some people think, It seems to  me,
It seems to me- You may agree.

Suggest they’ve faltered and you’ll see.
You’ll see amazment- “What?  Not me!
Not me, the fault is in your view.
Your  view if critical– untrue!”

Their poop’s foil-wrapped, it has no smell.
It has no smell, a fool can tell.
A  fool can tell they’re always right.
They’re always right; therein’s our plight.

Fawn, applaud, and give them respect.
Respect even what’s not correct.
Correct them once and you’ll be banned.
You’ll be banned: You don’t understand

© Lawrencealot – April 30, 2012

Example visual template

Partenza Represa

Staccato

The Staccato, created by Jan Turner, consists of two or more 6-line stanzas.
 
Rhyme scheme: aabbcc.
*Required internal rhyme scheme interplay between line #1 and line #2 (see below explanation and examples).
 
Meter:  10/10/8/8/10/10
 
Repeats: This form requires a 2-syllable repeat in Lines #3 and #6 as specified below.
 
As in a musical notation, The Staccato poetry form uses
short repeats which are abruptly disconnected
elements. The repeat words are read as rapid-fire speech,
such as staccato music when played or sung.
This form lends itself to strong emotion or instruction
(i.e. military poems: “Charge on! Charge on!” etc.),
a declaration (such as of an event: “We’re married!
We’re married!” etc.), an instruction or emphasis of
human emotion (such as love, hate, longing: “Be mine!
Be mine!” etc.), strong observation (such as
“Those eyes! Those eyes!” etc.) or any similar
situation where a strong staccato repeat is desired.
 
The emphatic two-syllable repeat in this poetry form
is written twice, consecutively, at the beginning of
Line #3 (each repeat in Line #3 is followed by an exclamation mark),
 and once again at the beginning of Line #6
(with or without an exclamation mark in Line #6).
 
Also, Line #2 requires an internal rhyme scheme that rhymes
with a word within Line #1, usually falling on
the 6th syllable (see examples below), but can fall earlier
in those two lines as long as the internal rhyme
matches the syllabic stress in both lines .
 
Example Poem
 
Let’s Write a Staccato
 
A staccato let’s write, right here and now.
It’s simple, really quite forward, here’s how.
Notice! Notice! Internal rhyme
in lines one and two just in time
for a repeated exclamation, yet
notice third repeat may in quiet set.
 
That inversion my dear, was just for show
to make the rhyme quite clear of course you know.
I know! I know! Poor form to teach
Is most certainly a bad breach.
Since this poem with that err I fetter
I know you, my readers, can do better.
 
(c) Lawrencealot – September 11, 2012
 
Visual Template
 
 

 

Tritina

The pattern of word-repetition is as follows, where the words that end
the lines of the first tercet are represented by the numbers “1 2 3”:
  1 2 3          – End words of lines in first tercet.
  3 1 2          – End words of lines in second tercet.
  2 3 1          – End words of lines in third tercet.
  (1 2 3)        – Words contained in the final line.
Your Composition.
The repetition of words in a Tritina makes this form a good match for
a story that uses common speech, for in conversation the repetition
of key words is common. The Tritina is a more “natural” form than the
Villanelle (which is comparatively artificial in repeating whole lines)
and the Sestina (which is significantly more challenging because it is
longer (39 lines) and reuses six words
in six six-line stanzas and a closing tercet).
Example Poem
Fido
I have  always liked dogs.
Almost all dogs I like.
And almost all like me.
Their faithfulness moves me.
I prefer smaller dogs
‘Cus big poop, I  don’t like.
Of course I  still do like
gals who are nice to me.
as long as they like dogs.
I like dogs;  dogs like me.
Visual Template