Trick Poetry

The poems that I have documented for this category  include
Trick Poetry                                   (four in one – OR many more)
and  Amera’s Style                        (2 in one ), both on this page
Alliterative Acrostic Trigee     (three in one)
Egg Beater                                (2 in one)
Hourglass                                       (2 in one)
The Trigee and the Cleave        (three in one)
The Faceted Diamond              (three in one – formatted)
Multidirectional Sonnet         (2 in one)  In Everysonnet blog.
Sephalian Reverse Sonnet    (2 in one) In Everysonnet blog.
Constanza                                     (two in one)
Forward/Backwards Poetry   (two in one)
Palidrome  (two in one)
Tuanortsa  (two in one)
Xenolith  (three in one)
 
 
In First Loves, Margaret Atwood describes this “trick” poem (“I Saw a Peacock” by an anonymous British poet) as “the first poem I can remember that opened up the possibility of poetry for me.” The trick is the two ways it can be understood; read a line at a time, or read from the middle of one line to the middle of the next. The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes notes that it appears in a commonplace book dated to around 1665; it seems to have been first published in the Westminster-Drollery in 1671.
I Saw a Peacock, with a fiery tail,
    I saw a Blazing Comet, drop down hail,
    I saw a Cloud, with Ivy circled round,
    I saw a sturdy Oak, creep on the ground,
    I saw a Pismire, swallow up a Whale,
    I saw a raging Sea, brim full of Ale,
    I saw a Venice Glass, full fifteen feet deep,
    I saw a well, full of men’s tears that weep,
    I saw red eyes, all of a flaming fire,
    I saw a House, as big as the Moon and higher,
    I saw the Sun, even in the midst of night,
    I saw the man, that saw this wondrous sight.
Write a “trick” poem using this technique.  
Each line must be able to be read separately, as well as from the middle of one line to the middle of the next.
Note: I made a simple template simply dividing your line in two parts.
Its advantage is simply that you can see separate parts and visualize how with will combine.
Note: in this poem . . each half is a complete rhyming poem,
each line can be read either way with the lines in the other column on the same line, or on the line above or below it, with rhyme in at lease one sequence.
In addition one can each of the different colored lines in a column, (either up or down) as a distinct poem.
Here is an AMERA STYLE where the bold words create a poem within a poem.
Secret place for Elves
Something we know how to do
Is build a place to hide from you
High up in the trees we climb
For scattles of years; in elfin time
So the king of elves came to me
Said build a house up in a tree
All he had to do was ask
Then the elves set to the task
A house in a tree, that’s what he said
To hide from humans that we dread
So we huddled we to whisper
To keep our plans much crisper
We need a name; what to call it?
A Tree House! That name will fit
So now our work has just begun
Hammering, singing elfin fun
A secret place high in the tree
place where no one else can see
A place to hide for another scattle
To avoid a nasty battle
A cozy place, a place to love
High up in the tree above
Secret creatures, Elves are we
Now living high up in the tree

Scupham Stanza

It was created by British poet, Peter Scupham.
It is
isosyllabic
stanzaic, written in any number of sixains,
rhymed: abccba
meter optional


Example Poem

Waisted!     (Scupham Stanza)
 
 
 
The Scupham rhyme is like our Cathie Jung.
Who is in the Guiness World Record book.
The stanza’s spread by rhyme  that pinches some
When to the middle you let rhyming come.
That could be construed as the hour-glass look.
A form for which this septarian’s sung.
© Lawrencealot – November 9, 2013
 
 
 
Author’s Note
The smallest waist belongs to Cathie Jung (USA, b. 1937),
who stands at 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) and has a corseted waist measuring
38.1 cm (15 in). Un-corseted, it measures 53.34 cm (21 in).
 
Visual Template
(Decasyllabic version)
 

Rhopalic Verse

A poem wherein the nTH word of every line in each stanza has N-syllables.
word 1 = 1syllable
word 2 = 2 syllables
word 3 = 3 syllables
word 4 = 4 syllables
word 5 = 5 syllables,  etc
(Syllabic, line length optional, rhyme optional, meter optional)
Example Poem
Expecting Her (Rhopalic Verse)
I’m thinking cautiously, realizing
that other’s promises evaporate
with nature’s forcible intervention.
She’ll arrive, defeating complications.
(c) Lawrencealot – April 25, 2013
Visual Template
 
 

Rhaiku

A Poetry form invented on AP by Matt
A poem consisting of One stanza of Rhyme, one stanza of haiku,
 and one stanza of free verse.
The order of the components is up to the poet.
 
Example Poem
 
Without Repentance
semi-clad, somnolent,
climbing over broken logs–
kids explore their camp
There had been no time
in the circadian twilight
to properly define the false
Niagara bubbling, with snatches
of Mozart melodies
into nearby brook.
The first awake, they had to take their tawny dog and find
the wonders here that did appear, as frozen, left behind
for summer time respite.  They’d climb and swim and even shout;
for being loud was here allowed, and home-based rules were out-
maybe fleecing their sister (decreasing her oatmeal share),
Some things do last without contrast and happen anywhere.
(c) Lawrencealot – October 20, 2012
Visual Template
 
 

Reverse Word

This form was invented by  Walter E. Ferguson III aka, Thunder_Speech of Allpoetry.The ONLY requirement of this form, is that you use reverse words where ever you might otherwise choose to use rhyme.  Instead of rhyming, the last words of the lines are spelled backwards (reversed) where rhymes would be.
Example Poem
Non-Olympic swimmer
I thought I’d swim a single loop
before I pulled the plug.
I jumped into our swimming pool
and promptly took a gulp.
I thought to myself “damn and rats”
and jumped out on my tarp.
I’ll never be a swimming star,
while sitting on my prat.
© Lawrencealot – September 26, 2012
Visual Template of this poem

Retourne

Like so many other French forms, the Retourne is all about repetition. It contains four quatrains and each line has eight syllables.
(16 lines, 8/8/8/8)
The trick is that the first stanza’s second line must also be the second stanza’s first line, the first stanza’s third line is the third stanza’s first, and the first stanza’s fourth line is the fourth stanza’s first.
Retournes do not have to rhyme. (rhyme optional)
Example Poem
Abandoned
I’d loved her only all my life.
She found another to her taste.
She left me– I now have no wife.
New city, no friends; joys erased.
She found another to her taste.
I begged, pleaded, asked her to stay
“I miss you, come back! what a waste,
keeping your lover is okay.”
She left me– I now have no wife.
Anquish bestirred me. I tried drink.
But quit to give my boys a life.
Work, feed the boys, cry, try to think.
New city, no friends; joys erased.
It took a long while, ‘ere I tried
to date– I was feeling disgraced
How could I ever lose my bride?
© Lawrencealot – April, 2012
Visual Template
 
 

Puente

“Puente” means bridge in Spanish. This form was invented by James Rasmusson.
Constructed in 3 stanzas, the 1st and 3rd are separate thoughts but share an equal number of lines and the center, bridge stanza. The middle stanza is one line and is enclosed in tildes (~) to distinguish itself as both the last line of the first stanza and the first line of the last stanza.
The meter and rhyming are at the poet’s discretion, free verse being perfectly acceptable. The title is has no guidelines; it need not match the bridge stanza like the example below.
 
Example Poem 
Opportunity Knocks 
A new form came upon the scene
and sep’rate topics are required
with bridging line in between
as linked by poet, so inspired. 
~ it’s both a test and opportunity~ 
Another contest has appeared
it features something yet untried
but that is nothing to be feared;
try it, you’ll be satisfied.
© Lawrencealot – May 31, 2013 

pantoum

The pantoum consists of a series of quatrains rhyming ABAin which the second and fourth lines of a quatrain recur as the first and third lines in the succeeding quatrain;
each quatrain introduces a new second rhyme as BCBC, CDCD .
The first line of the series recurs as the last line of the closing quatrain,
and third line of the poem recurs as the second line of the closing quatrain, rhyming ZAZA.
The design is simple:
Line 1
Line 2
Line 3
Line 4
Line 5 (repeat of line 2)
Line 6
Line 7 (repeat of line 4)
Line 8
Continue with as many stanzas as you wish, but the ending
stanza then repeats the second and fourth lines of the
previous stanza (as its first and third lines), and also
repeats the third line of the first stanza, as its second
line, and the first line of the first stanza as its fourth.
So the first line of the poem is also the last.
Last stanza:
Line 2 of previous stanza
Line 3 of first stanza
Line 4 of previous stanza
Line 1 of first stanza
NOTE: I found to meter specified for this form but on Shadow Poetry found examples from Iambic Trimeter to Pentameter
Example PoemThen She Married Me
I met her online, whatcha think of that?
In writing workshop I critiqued her work.
Then we played sensual games by chat.
Cutting out by need… the hotel desk clerk.
In writing workshop I critiqued her work.
Her stories aroused a man unfulfilled.
Cutting out by need… the hotel desk clerk.
Our minds connected; our Eros was thrilled.
Her stories aroused a man unfulfilled.
We climbed with words into each other’s head.
Our minds connected; our Eros was thrilled.
This late-night texting led me to her bed.
We climbed with words into each other’s head.
Then we played sensual games by chat.
This late-night texting led me to her bed.
I met her online, whatcha think of that?
(c) Lawrencealot April 2012
Visual Template

Dizain

Summary: Two accepted forms:
Eight lines:    Rhyming  ababcdcd
or Ten Lines:  Rhyming ababbccdcd
METER:  Not required; Classic meter customary.
A French form popular in the 15th and 16th centuries, it is a single
stanza of 8 or 10 lines (10 being more common), with 8 or 10 syllables
in each line (each line being of the same length). A classic meter is
normally used, e.g. iambic pentameter.
The rhyme scheme is ababcdcd, or ababbccdcd.
Below is an 8 stanza iambic tetrameter example.
Example Poem
Nighttime Magic
Nighttime Magic
Dark dandy finely cloaked does walk
with daunting cold disdain for some
at night presuming he can shock
and render still those thieves so dumb
as to try force against this man.
His staff benevolent, it’s said,
in daytime will foil nighttime plan
against him; leaving fools quite dead.
© Lawrencealot – April 2, 2012
Visual Template

Bibliographic Profile Acrostic

This a poetry form invented by AP’s own Andre_ben-YEHU 
It is named — BIBLIOBIOGRAPHIC PROFILE ACROSTIC. It may be rhymed or blank verse on any poetic frame and verse’s length; and “Poetic License” is allowed in the meter.
The composition in this form must paint a profile on the Tributee, and use title (s) of the tributee’s literary production within the stanzas or stanza. (Thus is is a formulaic work)
The purpose of this form is to honor the Tributee-author, the poetic Art, and to promote the tributee’s works.
Here is an example poem by Lawrencealot
Example Poem
Eusebius     ( BIBLIOBIOGRAPHIC PROFILE ACROSTIC)
MIRROR, MIRROR, a horror story moved me,  lacking gore.
Intrigued by Michael’s mild approach I ventured to read more.
Clearly FLOWER FROM THE STARS comes ready to delight fans
Having thrived on fantasy taking place in many lands
And thrilling readers of his poems. There I’ve read him most.
Even active folks may miss him He’ll not compete nor host.
Look for GUILE, CAMILLE, or POUT, different forms everyone.
**
Forms used by Swinburne left unnamed, reemergence he’s begun.
AMERA IS penned by this swain is exemplar Trijan refrain.
Now, VOICE OF ANGELS, Swinburne’s work and CAMILLE is again.
THE CHATEAU and THE CENTAURESS are sonnets with distinction.
If we can learn from these- quality won’t face extinction.
Now that I’ve said my piece and presented this micro view.
Arise and go check Eusebius out- all six of you.
© July 22, 2013 – Lawrencealot
NOTE 1:
The Acrostic spells Michael Fantina
Note 2:
All of these works are posted on Allpoetry
Stories:
MIRROR, MIRROR
FLOWER FROM THE STARS
Poems:
GUILE
CAMILLE
POUT
AMERA IS
VOICE OF ANGELS
CAMILLE
THE CHATEAU
THE CENTAURESS