Acrostic

The following are “lifted” from the Allpoetry Acrostic Course, free to all.
It is known that people do not always realize how impressive you can make an acrostic. And sometimes they are not thought of as poetry, because they do not rhyme….
But, here is breaking news for you! Poetry does not have to rhyme. And the glorious thing about acrostics, is that they have a hidden message down the side as well!
 ‘Standard Acrostic’.
To start. There are two main stages…
First, remember your brainstorming?
Did you pick a word or sentence? Put it down the side.
R
E
M
I
S
S
I
O
N
Now that you have your word, or phrase, think of the things that would fit. What does this word make you feel? How could you describe it? Use the brainstorm you had in assignment one. Your finished product should look a little like this…
Really happy now!
Excited too…
My Mum
Is nearly better
So thank you for your prayers!
So thank you for being generous
I love you all for
Opening lots of happiness to my Mum
Now she’s in remission.
Your next form has two names,
 Shadow or Mirror acrostic.
 I prefer shadow, so I’ll probably use that, but it does get called both.
This acrostic is similar to the standard form, but a bit harder.
The idea here is that you have the same message at the left side of the poem and at the right side.
Start work with the same idea.
Choose your word or sentence, for example:
F F
E E
E E
T T
And fill the middle. This is to add an extra ‘hidden message’ in the poem, a clever twist that sometimes people miss. Therefore, these poems work better if they actually make sense.
Feel the love on the shelf,
Expel your anger into torture.
Expect to be fueled by coffee,
To be dancing on that caffeine shot!
Acrosteleostic
The third form…
     Acrosteleostic.
This does not appear to be official in any way (or at least I have found no outside information on it). It seems it was created by a genius here on AP. Nonetheless, it’s an interesting form, and therefore worth teaching!
To start, you need a word. Then you need another with around the same number of letters for the other side.
Here, I shall write it, and see if you can view the message.
(A clue: I am not a ‘normal’ English woman. Why?)
Countless cups I drink with appreciatioN
Of liquid with it’s caffienated echO,
Feeling loved by it’s mental thoughT
Fell in love, the day it was boughT.
Everyday life spent with my friend coffeE…
Everyone knows I prefer it to teA!
Mesostich.
This is not quite as hard as the previous form. It requires a poem of almost any form, but the letters in the middle spell out the message.
For example, if every line had 13 letters, the 7th letter would form part of the message.
It would be wise to choose your message first, and then build your poem around it.
I have used the name TOYA.
Sitting here surrounded by dusT on all sides. I think all talking
is a must. I am alone in this old rOom. So, I can talk from birth to doom.
You may think I am crazy, but what Yelling will achieve? Everybody
knows you wear your heart on an Apron string. Tell me your belief?
Telestich.
Easier still. This form requires only the end letters to spell a message.
Again, it is wise to choose your word or sentence, and work around it.
If you get stuck, a tool I’ve learned to use is Google or a similar search engine. Type into the search bar “words ending with the letter ‘_'” and it will find pages for you. Same with the mesostich, type in the search bar “words with ‘t’ as the third letter,” or equivalent. No problems there…!
The hidden message here is mildly dire: read the last letter of every line to determine what the poem is about…
It is not to be confused (when you go out of your mind,
With being alive. People will care when you’re
Breathing whispers of Omega,
And meeting Alpha…a melancholy must.
Just waiting for the day you again grace earth.
Cross Acrostic. (I believe they may have run out of names!)
This form is a little trickier, but easier to understand, I think. There was a very famous one written by Edgar Allen Poe. Now even though most of you may never have studied his works (I’ll be honest and say that I have not…), his is a name that most of you should recognize as a famous poet. His poem was entitled ‘A Valentine,’ and was written to include the name of a sergeant. 
The idea behind this is that the message is hidden across the acrostic. The first line has the first letter, the second line with the second letter, and so on.
Feed me with love and energy,
Treat me with respect.
You can use me in so many ways…
But I ask only one thing.
Start your diet another day!
My word? Fruit.
Feed
tReat
yoU
but I
starT
Clever, huh? 
Triple Threat
You have learned several forms so far. You have practiced the art of hidden messages in several places within a poem: at the end, in the middle, spread out….
The first form here is called a Word Acrostic. Essentially, you must think of a sentence, small or long, and then make it into a poem. To further explain what I mean, I’ll demonstrate. (Pay attention, you will be writing one!)
‘I am teaching you’ will be my sentence.
I
Am
Teaching
You
…will go down the side, like that. Then you will fill the rest out, and, hopefully, it will still make sense. These work better if you like to be clever, and make the message completely the opposite of the poem.
I only want to know what you have to show me.
Am I presuming too much?
Teaching me the basics of your chosen trade…
You tell me everything I need to know.
This is the word acrostic.
Now, we get clever.
This is where we amalgamate (mix) three different things together, and it is one of my favourite ways to write. I will be honest and say I’ve not seen anyone else write one…so I am sharing my knowledge with you…we can spread the word!
I have coined it as a Triple Threat.
(Note to everyone, if you have seen it elsewhere, let me know, and I’ll happily share the credit!)
This little beauty mixes the wholeness of a poem, with two hidden messages.
To make this, you need to do an acrostic, then a word acrostic, then the rest of the poem.
Sound complicated? I’ll show you how… Maybe you’ll enjoy them as much as I?!
Here’s one I wrote earlier.
Sentence- I will win yet…
I
W
I
L
L
W
I
N
Y
E
T
Now you have your basis, you need to work out a sentence that runs alongside it…
I
Wish
I
Lived
Lots,
When
I
Needed
You.
End
This!
  Remember
  Failure.
There is a sentence or two. Sometimes, if you can include the punctuation, it helps people see the hidden message; however, this is not always possible.
On top of this, if the poem feels ‘unfinished’ with the sentence as it is, you might need to add a couple lines. I have done this, and indented them so they are seen as part of the poem but not part of the standard acrostic. However, they make sense as part of the word acrostic.
And the poem in full…
know one thing only.
Wish myself to have been more.
I dream of better endings.
Lived for myself, for others-
Lots of love shared…
When I go,
I will regret one thing, I
Needed more. Just more
You. You were everything I had.
End draws near- I look back.
This Is It.
      Remember one thing…
      Failure is an option.
You may have noticed that the poem and the message are opposite? Again, a nice touch you might see often in acrostics.

Alliterisen poetry form

The Alliterisen (Complex and Rhyming), a form created by Udit Bhatia, is a simple seven-lined poem with a specific syllable pattern and two alliterations per line.  For example: Glorious Graves, and wonderful waves. Alliteration is the succession of similar consonant sounds. They are not recognized by spelling, but rather by sounds.

 The syllable structure for the Complex Alliterisen is as follows:

 1st line- x syllables
2nd line- x+2 syllables
3rd line- x-1 syllables
4th line- (x+2)-1 syllables
5th line- x-2 syllables
6th line- (x+2)-2 syllables
7th line- x syllables

 which allows for infinite syllable sequences.

 Pasted from <http://www.shadowpoetry.com/resources/wip/alliterisen.html>

 

Example Poem 

 The Knight of the Shopping Queen (  Complex Alliterisen with monorhyme) 

 Momma mumbles and grandpa grumbles but off they go.
She’s got stores selected and he’s got gumption and lots of dough.
Solicitous salesmen appear, all with grand goods to show
needles, brass bobbins, templates and many fine fabrics to sew
Gramps grabs her next favored choice;  takes it in tow.
Store after store momma’s  proven plaza pro
And Gramps just grins and waits until when momma says whoa.

© Lawrencealot – Feb 3, 2012

 

ALLITERISEN – Rhyming

–Must have only 7 syllables in each line (isosyllabic 7)
–Must use aabbccd rhyme scheme.
–Must have only 7  lines in the stanza.
–Must have one alliteration per line.

–Must be only one stanza (7 lines) although you could create one with two stanzas and call it a Double Rhyming Alliterisen-which means a three stanza one would be called a Triple Rhyming Alliterisen, and so on.

 

Example Poem 

 

Facing Off    (Rhyming Alliterisen) 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 


My clock was clearly mocking

with its tick-ing and tock-ing.
“Get to work, write right away.
I track time through-out the day.
I’m not mocking you, fine friend,
just prodding your plodding pen.”
His song’s sure despite his face.

© Lawrencealot – April 13, 2013

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Atrina

The ATRINA form was Invented by Keith Metcalf Drew of AllPoetry.A stanzaic poem of 18 lines, consisting of 3 quatrains and a sestet.
It is isosyllabic, each line have 8 syllables.
Rhymed: AaaA BbbB CccC AaBbCc where the capital letters indicate refrain lines.
(AaaABbbBCccCAaBbCc)
The first and last lines in each verse are exactly the same.
The third line in each verse is of similar wording to the second line or reversed i however prefer it if you use the same words but reversed.
Then when you have written the three verses.
The fourth verse consists of the first two lines from each of the three verses.
Here is an example:
AN ATRINA:
Her heart it pales in shades of grey,
The pain inside to ever stay,
Inside the pain to ever stay,
Her heart it pales in shades of grey,
Reciting all the poems she’d read,
The lover lost within her bed,
Lost the lover within her bed,
Reciting all the poems she’d read,
And deep within she still believes,
The angels keep her heart its grief,
The grief her heart the angels keep,
And deep within she still believes,
Her heart it pales in shades of grey,
The pain inside to ever stay,
Reciting all the poems she’d read,
The lover lost within her bed,
And deep within she still believes.
The angels keep her heart its grief.
 Example Poem
From the Mist    (Atrina)
A love like yours is heaven’s gift.
It saved a soul that was adrift.
A soul was saved that was adrift.
A love like yours is heaven’s gift.
You came to me out of the mist.
Your lips demanding to be kissed.
Your lips expecting to be kissed.
You came to me out of the mist.
I left mere mortals on the shore
to be with you forever more.
with you I’ll be forever more.
I left mere mortals on the shore.
A love like yours is heaven’s gift.
It saved a soul that was adrift.
You came to me out of the mist.
Your lips demanding to be kissed.
I left mere mortals on the shore
to be with you forever more.
© Lawrencealot – March 10, 2013
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Cascade

Created by Udit Bhatia, the Cascade form “is all about receptiveness, but in a smooth cascading way like a waterfall”. There is no set meter or rhyme scheme. The defining feature of the form is that the lines of the first stanza are repeated as refrain lines in subsequent stanzas to give a “cascading effect”. S1 L1 is repeated as the last line of S2, S1 L2 is repeated as the last line of S3, and so on until all lines in S1 have been used. The number of stanzas is therefore one more than the number of lines in S1.
Example rhyme scheme for a three stanza Cascade: ABC xxA xxB xxC, (ABCxxAxxBxxC)
Rhyme optional, Meter optional, 6 lines or more, line refrain.
 Example Poem
Write a Cascade
The cascade poem can grow in length and width. It’s flexible.
If three lines in one stanza, then stanzas will add up to four.
That means a cascade can be used for many types of contests.
This is an example , a small sample, meter is ignored.
Allowing able alliteration,  but without end rhyme.
The cascade poem can grow in length and width. It’s flexible.
You shall see in Cascade Two that rhyme was planned for and was used.
This monstrous, frigging thing  clamors for abundant verbiage.
If three lines in one stanza, then stanzas will add up to four.
Since this was didactic write, with no metaphor and image.
The flowing effect of my repeating lines might not appear.
That means a cascade can be used for many types of contests.
(c) Lawrencealot – April 22, 2012
Visual Template
 This poem by Discoveria of AllPoetry
(A four line Cascade)

Catena Rondo

Catena Rondo is a stanzaic form created by 20th century Canadian educator, author and poet, Robin Skelton. The form lends itself to the longer poem because of the repetition of lines. It has an unusual cadence within the quatrain, suggesting that L2 and L3 form a couplet leaving L1 and L4 as separate thought units within the quatrain. L2 is then repeated as the first and last lines in the next stanza. The repetition of lines reminds me of the Pantoum but more complicated. The form was found at Poet’s Garret.
The Cateno Rondo is:
 stanzaic, written in any number of 3 or more quatrains (12 lines or more) made up of 2 rhymed lines enveloping a rhymed couplet.
 meter optional at the discretion of the poet.
 rhymed, rhyme scheme ABbA BCcb CDdc DEed etc… (ABbABCcbCDdc, where the capital letter depict lines that are refrains) until the  enveloped couplet of the penultimate quatrain repeats L1 of the poem  MAam bringing the final quatrain back to the original scheme of the  1st quatrain ABbA.
It appear from this scenario that the only line of the last stanza that
could be original is L3 since L1, L2 and L4 are repetitions of the same
numbered lines of the first stanza.
Poet’s Garret makes it easier by suggesting the complete last stanza
be a repetition of the first stanza.
 composed with repetition the 2nd line of each stanza as L1 and L4 of the next stanza.
 The poem should come full circle and end up with the same rhyme scheme used in the 1st quatrain.
 Therefore it is important that 1st and 2nd lines of the poem be strong enough to end the poem.
This form is the brainchild of Robin Skelton,academic, writer, poet and anthologist. It is a Quatrain, and the second line forms a rhyming couplet with the third line and is also used as the first and fourth line of the following stanza. Any number of stanzas can be created this way and the final stanza is a repeat of the first. This gives a rhyme scheme of;
A. B. b. A.…. B. C. c B…. C. D. d. C….finally …
F. A. a. F…..A. B. b. A.….
There is no set meter. Here is an abbreviated example
So Misty through the Dream
The sun does shine upon the reeds.
The lake glistens; a twinkling dance;
On the hills, we three entranced.
The sun does shine upon the reeds.
The lake glistens; a twinkling dance.
Under water breathes like air.
We dip our heels, submerged, we dare.
The lake glistens; a twinkling dance.
Under water breathes like air.
A silvery light consumes the sun.
Deeper down, search we as one.
Under water breathes like air.
Cont till
We three stretch legs upon the lands.
The sun is shining on the reeds.
Up through the silvery lake of seeds
We three stretch legs upon the lands.
The sun does shine upon the reeds.
The lake glistens; a twinkling dance;
On the hills, we three entranced.
The sun does shine upon the reeds.
Moss Macan Ghoill
Some people mistakenly think that this form cannot support shorter forms and that it is only suited to poems over 5 stanza in length. It is because this form encourages longer poems simply because it encourages and makes longer poetry pleasurable. That is not to say that the poet cannot write shorter poems. The minimum of course must have a statement, a link and a closure, that is three stanza. Here is an example:
When Clouds Cry
When clouds cry it’s not because they’re sad
Rather it is because they are content
That most lovers have the right intent
When clouds cry it’s not because they’re sad
Rather it is because they are content
When clouds cry it’s not because they’re sad
Seeing lovers they realise things aren’t bad
Rather it is because they are content
When clouds cry it’s not because they’re sad
Rather it is because they are content
That most lovers have the right intent
When clouds cry it’s not because they’re sad
Ryter Roethicle
Example Poem
Tell Me When You’re Coming
When you come to Reno, tell me.
I buy drinks for my A.P. friends.
A poet’s friendship never ends.
When you come to Reno, tell me.
I buy drinks for my A.P. friends.
A.P. poets expand my life.
Keep me from pestering my wife.
As of yet, I don’t wear Depends.
A.P. poets expand my life.
An autograph I shall require
on one poem that lights my fire,
About love or war, peace or strife.
An autograph I shall require.
Offer good if I’m not in jail
or if I am, if you’ve got bail.
We’ve got a jail that you’ll admire.
Offer good if I’m not in jail
With gals I’ll speak of poetry,
with guys about what interests me,
and let you simply spin a tale.
With gals I’ll speak of poetry.
When you come to Reno, tell me.
Least you’ll get a libation free.
With gals I’ll speak of poetry.
When you come to Reno, tell me.
I buy drinks for my A.P. friends.
You’ve read me- thus I’ll make amends.
When you come to Reno, tell me.
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When you come to Reno, tell me.

Clerihew

clerihew is a whimsical, four-line biographical poem invented by Edmund Clerihew Bentley, at age 16.
A clerihew has the following properties:
  • It is biographical and usually whimsical, showing the subject from an unusual point of view; it pokes fun at mostly famous people
  • It has 4 lines of irregular length and metre (for comic effect)
  • The rhyme structure is aabb; the subject matter and wording are often humorously contrived in order to achieve a rhyme, including the use of phrases in Latin, French and other non-English Languages[2]
  • The first line contains, and may consist solely of, the subject’s name.
Clerihews are not satirical or abusive, but they target famous individuals and reposition them in an absurd, anachronistic or commonplace setting, often giving them an over-simplified and slightly garbled description (similar to the schoolboy style of 1066 and All That)
The unbalanced and unpolished poetic meter and line length parody the limerick, and the clerihew in form also parodies the eulogy.
Note:  I have found that many what have been presented as Clerihew  have not been
rigorous about the first line name-rhyming.  Indeed I have not.  I have also tended
to use a fixed meter.  They can be fun, but we must remind ourselves they are not
formally Clerihew and should be labeled accordingly when attempting a rigorous interpretation.
Example Poems
Bruce  (Clerihew)
Bruce Willis continues alive,
Now showing Die Hard number five.
I’m a Bruce Willis junky, sure.
He is my Schwarzenegger cure.
Arnie    (Clerihew)
If Schwarzenegger tries once more
his movie ceiling’s near the floor.
A machine using Arnie’s voice
looks to be a desperate choice.
© Lawrencealot – October 21, 2012
Visual Template
Note:  there can be no definitive template for this form for meter and
line length are irregular.  This is merely one example.

English Quintet

The English Quintet is a rhymed 5 line stanza or poem. There is no English word for a 5 lines of verse therefore they borrowed the Italian word quintet. Up until the 19th century English poetry was pretty much built on the couplet and quatrain. The English version of the quintet arrived at a time when most English poetry was still being written in iambic pentameter.
The English Quintet is:
• stanzaic, written in any number of quintets.
• metered, most commonly iambic pentameter, although meter is optional.
This is a popular form of Quintain having no set measure or foot
rhyme scheme ababb, cdcdd etc.
Description of form copied and pasted from PoetryMagnumOpus.com http://www.poetrymagnumopus.com/index.php?showtopic=670

Thanks to Judi Van Gorder for the wonderful resource above.
Line length optional
Meter optional
Poem length 5 lines or multiple
Example Poem
Not a Muscle Car

I earned my dough to buy a car at last.
In ’56 I’d break the geekdom mold.
“No”, said mom “You’ll buy nothing that goes fast.
You’re sixteen and will do what you are told.”
I could afford to buy some car quite old.
A Studebaker, mom thought looked all right.
With white walls it stood proudly green and clean.
It had one after market feature quite
unique, a sequined roof of stars was seen
upon the overhead; girls thought it keen.
It lasted ’til my high school days were done.
Four bits worth of gas could cruise all night long.
The crankshaft dropped so no more could it run.
That happened when I punched it- that was wrong,
and why mom let me buy it for a song.
© Lawrencealot –  December 16, 2012
Visual Template (for Iambic pentameter)

Gratitude

This form was Created by Victoria Sutton aka Passionspromise
It consists of two or more 8 line stanzas, each with the
refrain rhyming scheme of  ababcCab
with ONLY the “c-rhyme” requiring the same sound each stanza.
There is NO metric or line length requirement, EXCEPT that
lines 5 and 6 are shorter than the others.
Example Poem
A Gift to Poets (Gratitude)
A lovely poet gave to me this form.
She said, “Take it. Perhaps you’ll find a way
to specify the path to keep it warm.”
The specs I saw were loose enough to sway
a poet to invent
and follow mind’s intent.
I’ve chosen Iambs, you need not conform.
I’m grateful this form let’s the poet play.
I first thought “Torylet” could be the name,
but “toilet” sounds too close for me so now,
while sitting here, this new idea came.
I’ll name it, “Gratitude” in note of how
the poet may select his bent
and follow mind’s intent.
My next attempt shall be a whole new game
for many variants this will allow.
© Lawrencealot – November 5, 2012
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Jram

Jram form Invented by LilacThOughts of Allpoetry.com.
Stanzaic: 5 quatrains.
Isosyllabic:  10  or 8 syllables to each line
Rhyme scheme: aabb bbcc bbdd aadd aaff  (aabbbbccbbddaabbaaff).
The last line of 1st stanza becomes 1st line of second stanza
Refrain: 3rd line of 1st stanza becomes 1st line of 3rd stanza
2nd line of 1st stanza becomes 1st line of 4th stanza
1st line of 1st stanza become 1st line of 5th stanza
Meter: optional by the poet, Iambic Pentameter works well
This form may also be used with tetrameter
as a poetic option.
Example Poem
Poets’ Love
Our poems relieved a certain unrest.
We drove each other to produce our best.
Though verse we lived where neither still could go.
Within our verses we did make it so.
Within our verses we did make it so.
We’d sail on yachts and sip of fine Bordeaux.
Tall peaks were climbed and pleasant valleys crossed.
We found adventure, and our fears were lost.
Though verse we lived where neither still could go.
We crossed desserts and mountains capped with snow.
Ignoring barriers thwarting us in life,
By-passed, surmounted without any strife.
We drove each other to produce our best.
We strolled thru poem forms as though possessed.
We thought a lot alike and loved to share.
I felt alone at times she wasn’t there.
Our poems relieved a certain unrest.
We soothed each other during times of stress.
When things became too much for her to bear.
I only hoped it mattered I was there.
© Lawrencealot – September 15, 2013
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Jram

Quatern

The Quatern is a French form that consists of four quatrains (4-line stanzas),
with 8 syllables in each line.
The first line of stanza 1 is repeated as a refrain line as the second line of stanza 2,
the third line of stanza 3 and the last line of stanza 4.
There is no set meter or rhyme scheme.
 
Possible rime schemes  –  virtually any are ok
i. Abab, cAca, adAd, eaeA
ii. Aabb, aAbb, bbAa, bbaA
iii. Axax, xAxa, axAx, xaxA
Example Poem
Write a Quatern
This line shall serve as a refrain.
Each stanza moves it down again.
This form is in tetrameter,
but may be done pentameter
Though that does go against the grain.
This line shall serve as a refrain.
The first two lines were fine iambs,
But in the next, that meter scrams.
No meter is required at all
which makes choosing good words, a ball.
This line shall serve as a refrain.
Rhyming with refrain is no strain.
Just two more lines will do the trick.
Then we are finished pretty quick
You’re forced to “a” rhyme once again.
This line shall serve as a refrain.
© Lawrencalot – April 1, 2012
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